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Sorting Categories

Polymer Physics (DPOLY)

01.00.00
DPOLY Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
01.01.00
Focus Sessions
01.01.01
Machine Learning and Data in Polymer Physics (DPOLY, DBIO, DCOMP, GDS, FIAP) [same as 04.01.19, 16.01.17, 23.01.10, 08.01.05]Data-analytic techniques, such as machine learning, are accelerating development of materials classification, predictions of new properties or formulations, data extraction from natural language processing, and design and analyses of experimental assays. We solicit contributions that intertwine polymers and soft materials with machine learning and data. Of particular interest are efforts unifying data science with experimental research, work on generating high-throughput data collection strategies, developing high-throughput instrumentations and characterization techniques, explorations of vast existing datasets for the design of new materials, development of highly efficient simulations, and techniques to mine or combine data of different forms and different sources (e.g. simulations, rheology or scattering) that elucidate fundamental polymer physics.

Debbie Audus, Enrique Gomez, Jonathan Whitmer, Xiaodan Gu

01.01.02
Organic Electronics (DPOLY, FIAP, DMP) [same as 08.01.06]This session invites work concerning organic electronics, including but not limited to, the physics that govern conjugated polymers, charge transport in macromolecular systems, mixed ionic and electronic conductors, redox-active macromolecules, and efforts dealing with the polymer physics of organic electronic devices. Experimental, computational, and theoretical studies are encouraged.

Bryan Boudouris, Rafael Verduzco

01.01.03
Nonequilibrium Structures of Polymeric Materials (DPOLY, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 03.01.29, 02.01.30]Nonequilibrium structures are ubiquitous in real-world applications of polymeric materials. They often form and evolve as a result of mechanical deformation, thermal treatment, physical mixing, solvent evaporation, and interfacial forces, as well as a number of other intrinsic driving forces. Control, characterization, and modeling of these nonequilibrium structures are of vital importance for the industry, and at the same impose significant challenges for the polymer physics community. This focus session will bring together both experimental and theoretical researchers to discuss recent advances in understanding of nonequilibrium polymer structures, including manipulation and control of structures, state-of-the-art characterization techniques, and development in theories and simulations.

Shiwang Cheng, Yangyang Wang

01.01.04
New Directions in Polymer Nanocomposites (DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 03.01.27]Tuning the properties of polymer materials by adding nanoscale fillers has been utilized over the past few decades. The purpose of this focus session is to cover new directions with respect to creating, understanding, predicting, and modeling structure-property relationships in polymer nanocomposites. Areas of interest include, but not limited to, nanocomposite dynamics, non-equilibrium processes, hierarchical structures away from equilibrium, and structure-property relationships. The nanocomposite field is large and covers many areas, therefore we welcome contributions both from advanced experiments, new theories, and multi-scale computer simulation and modeling. Recent developments based on big data and machine learning on understanding and predicting the structure-property relationship of polymer nanocomposites are also of the interest.

Rob Hickey, Shiwang Cheng

01.01.05
Physics of Polymer RecyclingThis session will focus on the physics and chemistry involved in designing and optimizing recycling strategies for polymer wastes, ranging from mixed polyolefins to novel sustainable polymers. Topics of interest include but are not limited to fundamental studies of properties and behaviors of polymers, such as rheology, phase separation, and crystallization, during recycling processes, optimization of processing conditions for plastic wastes, and designing novel additives for enhancing the properties of the recycled polymer samples.

Wenlin Zhang

01.01.06
Single-Molecule Characterization of Polymers and Soft MatterExperiments and simulations of molecular-scale phenomena have revealed unexpected and heterogeneous behavior in polymeric, biological, and soft materials. Recently, single-molecule investigations have shifted toward more challenging physicochemical environments, including polymerization reactions, topologically complex molecular architectures, self-assembled nanostructures, and porous soft materials. This Focus Session invites contributions to all aspects of single-molecule characterization pertaining to polymers and soft matter. Possible topics of interest include but are not limited to: visualization of single polymer chains via fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, etc.; measurements of single biopolymers such as DNA and actin; force studies of single polymer chain elasticity or secondary structures via optical or magnetic tweezers; quantification of polymerization and diffusion via single-molecule tracer studies; simulation of single polymers during self-assembly, under fluid flow, and in confinement; and the development of new approaches to investigate molecular-scale phenomena in soft materials.

Danielle Mai, Alex Klotz

01.01.07
Responsive Polymers, Soft Materials, and Hybrids (DPOLY, DSOFT, ) [same as 02.01.24]Stimuli-responsive polymers and soft materials have been utilized for generating various shapes, motions, and functions by spatial and temporal changes in their physical and/or chemical properties due to external stimuli (i.e., temperature, light, pH, salt, electricity, humidity, etc). Such designable and programmable characteristics have created new opportunities in applications ranging from drug delivery, biomimetic systems, sensors, actuators, to soft robotics. This focus session covers recent advances in stimuli-responsive polymers, soft materials, and hybrids including fundamentals of materials, manufacturing techniques, characterization of the response, and their applications at various size scales. We welcome experimental and computational contributions.

Jinhye Bae

01.01.08
Macromolecular Engineering of FormulationsThe focus session welcomes contributions that highlight progress, challenges, and opportunities underlying macromolecules engineering of formulations used as foods, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, inks, paints, and coatings. The emphasis is expected to be on concepts drawn from fundamental and applied polymer science that enable the use of macromolecules as rheology modifiers (tackifiers, thickeners), film or fiber formers, stabilizers, emulsifiers, structuring agents, delivery systems, and for modifying adhesion, permeability, water or retention. Contributions that highlight how concepts, experiments, and simulations based on fundamental polymer physics drive applied research on multicomponent formulations are welcome.

Vivek Sharma

01.01.09
Physics of Foams (DPOLY, DSOFT) [Same as 02.01.30]Foams are ubiquitous and highly complex non-equilibrium structures that can be encountered everywhere, from construction materials to biological systems to processed food and drink. Physics of foams is thus highly interdisciplinary, including mechanics, liquid and solid rheology, thermodynamics and statistical physics, and hydrodynamics. This session aims to include experimental, theoretical, and computational contributions related to all aspects of foam physics.

Valeriy Ginzburg, Kshitish Patankar

01.01.10
Sequence-Controlled PolymersThe macroscopic properties of materials are largely determined by their microstructure, which often cannot be changed once made. This limitation applies to most ‘hard’ materials. By contrast, soft biological materials such as proteins and tissues respond to external stimuli (pH, heat, electric/magnetic field, light, or mechanical shear) by changing the structure of constituent components and thus properties, which yield adaptive function often inaccessible by manmade materials. Underpinning this contrast is the basic component of biological materials – biomacromolecules with sequentially and/or randomly arranged monomers of prescribed physical and chemical properties. Inspired by this, recent work is starting to demonstrate the rich physics and unusual properties associated with sequence-controlled polymers and/or heteropolymers characterized by the multiscale assembly, complex microstructures, adaptive (mechanical, electric, or optical) properties, and melded function. This session will focus on this emerging direction in polymers and soft matter research.

Liheng Cai

01.01.11
Polymer and Polyelectrolyte Rheology (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DFD) [same as 02.01.25, 03.01.28, 20.01.11]The focus session highlights the recent progress and challenges in polymer and polyelectrolytes rheology. The session welcomes experimental, theoretical, or computational approaches highlighting how polymer charge, elasticity, extensibility, flexibility, and chemistry influence the shear, extensional, and interfacial rheological response, and how the interplay of macromolecular hydrodynamics, non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, and rheological properties influences processing conditions and processability. Contributions are solicited for rheological studies motivated by emerging applications including printing, additive manufacturing, electro-spinning and centrifugal spinning, hydrogels for biomedical applications, fracking, materials for energy harvesting or storage, among others. Contributions addressing questions related to nonlinear viscoelasticity of entangled solutions and melts, elastic instabilities, characterization of extensional viscosity, gelation kinetics, order-disorder transitions, self-assembled, supramolecular, and associative polymers, properties of complexes and coacervates, and response to large amplitude oscillatory shear are welcome.

Samanvaya Srivastava

01.01.12
Polyelectrolyte ComplexationThe phenomenon of polyelectrolyte complexation can take many forms including coacervation, precipitations, and multilayer assembly, among others. Understanding the fundamental physics of these complexes, as well as how these complexes can be manipulated through a variety of stimuli including salt, pH, temperature is of utmost importance for a wide variety of applications including, but not limited to underwater adhesives, drug-delivery, and membranes. This focus session covers all aspects of polyelectrolyte complexation, including the structure, dynamics and rheology of complexes, advances in chemical synthesis techniques and all methods of study, as well as emerging application areas in these systems.

Svetlana Morozova, Jelena Dinic

01.01.13
Structure, Dynamics, and Mechanics of Polymer Networks (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 02.01.33, 04.01.32]Soft materials based on polymer networks are critical for engineering and biomedical applications due to their ability to deform elastically and extensively prior to failure. When subject to large deformations, these materials fail because of breakage of individual polymer chains around regions of high stress concentrations. A common strategy to delay failure is to incorporate dynamic bonds in the polymer network; leading to an enriched time-dependent mechanical behavior, as well as numerous fundamental questions. This session will focus on the structure-dynamics-mechanics relationships of polymer networks. We encourage contributions that undertake novel molecular designs, physico-chemical characterization tools, and theoretical frameworks to (i) unveil the physics governing the mechanics of soft materials across multiple length scales and timescales and (ii) engineer soft materials to address pressing societal challenges.

Gabriel Sanoja

01.01.14
Molecular Glasses (DPOLY, DSOFT, DCP, DMP) [same as 02.01.34, 05.01.07]The way in which a molecular glass is formed may tremendously impact its thermodynamic state and final properties of relevance to various applications. Systems of interest include polymers, low molecular weight glass formers, and inorganic glasses. Understanding how the processing conditions of vitrification and the subsequent long-term aging in the glassy state influence glass properties may provide information of utmost importance on fundamental open questions on the nature of the glass transition. In this session, we invite talks that address the most recent advancements in the topic by experiments, theory, and simulations. Systems of interest include molecular glasses of different nature and obtained under a wide variety of conditions, including glasses obtained at different cooling rates, aged for a prolonged time, pressure densified, and vapor deposited via different routes.

Rod Priestley, Daniele Cangialosi

01.01.15
Dynamics of Glassy Polymers Under Nanoscale Confinement (DPOLY, DSOFT, DCP) [same as 02.01.35, 05.01.06]Central to the advancement of many technologies is the miniaturization of functional devices to the nanometer length scale. As polymers continue to play a prominent role in material solutions in meeting the challenges of reducing size, they are undoubtedly being utilized at length scales approaching the dimensions of the unperturbed macromolecule. Furthermore, with decreasing the confining dimension to the nanoscale, an increasingly larger fraction of macromolecules is in direct contact with interfaces. This session aims to illuminate the recent experimental and computational, as well as theoretical contributions, regarding the characterization and modification of polymer dynamics at the nanoscale and at surfaces, emphasizing glass formation, dynamic heterogeneity, physical aging, secondary relaxations, fragility, and mechanical properties. This session also invites contributions aimed at exploiting confinement and interfaces to develop polymeric systems with unique properties.

Rod Priestley, Daniele Cangialosi

01.01.16
Self-Assembly and Phase Separation of Polymers and Charged Soft Matter (DPOLY, DSOFT [same as 02.01.31]Charged polymers introduce long-range electrostatic forces that can influence assembly at the nanoscale, and by extension, ion mobility. In this session, research will be presented related to how charged polymers, polyelectrolytes, gels, and other soft materials expand the search space for nanostructures with targeted morphology and functionality. In addition to electrostatic screening in solution and the formation of electrochemical double layers at surfaces and interfaces, long-range intermolecular interactions, including hydrogen bonding, specific ion effects, and charge cohesion and ordering can result in the formation of nanostructures that are inaccessible to neutral materials. In addition to device fabrication and other applications, the fundamental physics governing assembly of charged soft materials capable of learning and memory will be discussed.

Pat Collier, Bradley Lokitz

01.01.17
Structure and Dynamics of Ion-Containing PolymersIonic groups in the polymer backbone control their association into clusters and these clusters in turn control the polymer dynamics. These ionic clusters also govern the transport properties of these materials. This focus session will explore how the long-range interactions introduced by the presence of ionic blocks affect the structure and dynamics of structured ionic co-polymers, hence their properties. Computations and experiments presentations which explore the correlations of polymer chemistry and topology with the structure and dynamics of the macromolecules on multi-time-length-scales in melts and solutions and at interfaces are encouraged.

Gary Grest

01.01.18
Polymer Brushes and Functional Interfaces (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.36]This session highlights advances in the description of macromolecules that comprise interfaces – both solid-liquid/gaseous (polymer brushes) and liquid-liquid (e.g., micelles or block copolymer interfaces). Interfacial confinement leads to unique changes in polymer chain conformation. Further, the limited conformational mobility due to tethered chain ends enables dynamic applications that afford reversible modification of physical interface properties. As such, polymer brushes and interface-tethered macromolecules impact a wide range of applications: from those that require tailored surface properties (e.g., wettability) to heterogeneous catalysis, organic electronics, separations, and engineered interfaces for guided cell growth and targeted anti-fouling.

Christian Pester, Jan Genzer

01.01.19
Polymer Crystals and CrystallizationThis focus session invites presentations related to polymer crystals and crystallization with the focus on molecular level understanding of polymer crystal structure, morphology, and crystallization pathway. Correlation of the crystalline structure, morphology and crystallization process with mechanical, transport (e.g. electron, ion, gas), and dielectric properties are of interest. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following studies: chain architecture and polymer crystallization, transport behavior in polymer crystal-containing systems, polymer crystallization in hybrid systems: epitaxy, graphoepitaxy and soft epitaxy; structural and morphological development of ordered polymer chains in hard and/or soft confined space; ultra-small polymer crystals; ultra-large polymer crystals; curved, scrolled and twisted crystals; polymer crystallization during processing. Both theoretical and experimental studies are welcome.

Christopher Li

01.01.20
Polymer structure formation and dynamics in solutionThe impact of polymer chain dynamics and assembly in solution ranges from discovery of new, highly controlled materials to understanding and mimicking the complexity of nature in equilibrated or non-equilibrated state. For example, dynamics of polymer chains in solution can influence flows, interfacial behavior like lubrication, and other bulk properties. Assembled conjugated polymeric aggregates tremendously impacts their optoelectronic property. Structure formation in solution can simulate biological assemblies and produce almost infinite morphological possibilities. Structure formation depends on the chemical details of the backbone, the precise location of interaction, backbone flexibility, pedant sidechain groups and polymer solvent interactions. These effects encompass many impactful discoveries, like micelles, coacervates, and biologically-inspired assemblies. Contributions to this focus session will highlight recent advances in polymer solution assembly and dynamics, as well as new tools, data interpretation, computational method and theory. This includes a broad range of physical behaviors and systems, including block copolymers, polyelectrolytes, functional conjugated polymers, doped polymers, grafted polymers, ring polymers, dendritic polymers, and others. Studies can include both equilibrium and non-equilibrium behaviors in the presence of external stimuli. Works on unique structures, polymeric architecture, morphologies, functional polymeric material, and new structure-property relationships are particularly encouraged. Combination of experimental results and simulation is highly welcomed.

Xiaodan Gu

01.01.21
Polymers and block copolymers at interfaces (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.37]The physical chemistry of interfacial region between two phases is important in adhesion, lubrication, material design and synthesis, membranes, and colloidal systems. The interfaces can also be used as the loci for crystallization, polymerization, copolymerization, or grafting. The session is a good fit but not limited to following topics: kinetics of adsorption at the interface, surface/interfacial rheology of amphiphilic macromolecules, self-assembly of block copolymers in solvents and at interfaces, conformation of polymers and block copolymers at the interface, the effect of polymers on colloidal stability, (co)polymerization at the surface, grafting to/from surfaces, the importance of surface forces for pattern formation on surfaces, etc.

Reza Foudazi

01.01.22
Polymers in Living Systems (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 02.01.32, 04.01.58]Living systems are exclusively composed of soft polymeric materials that exhibit complex structural and dynamic behavior. While fundamental understanding of soft materials provides critical insight into biological behavior, living systems exploit novel physical mechanisms that are distinct from those that are present in synthetic systems. Biological synthesis enables cells to tailor their biopolymer composition with exquisite precision, and active processes associated with enzymatic activity enable cells and tissues to form adaptive structures that respond to environmental cues. This session focuses on experimental and theoretical studies of the physical behavior of polymers in living cells and tissues. Possible topics in this session will focus on fundamental polymer physics at all scales in living matter. Such studies may include, but are not limited to, intranuclear phenomena such as chromosomal organization and dynamics, cytoskeletal and cellular structure and properties, and intercellular communication and tissue assembly.

Andy Spakowitz

01.01.23
Transport Phenomena in Polymers and Polymer MembranesThis session focuses broadly on transport phenomena of small molecules in polymers and polymer membranes. The session seeks experimental, theoretical, and simulation-based submissions, including but not limited to, diffusion, sorption, and permeation of gas, liquid, ion, vapor, and other small molecule transport in polymers, multicomponent transport in polymers, polymer-polymer diffusion, and novel experimental methods for measuring transport phenomena in polymers.

Hee Jeung Oh

01.01.24
Molecular, Ion, and Thermal Transport in Polymers (DPOLY, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.20]Molecular and ion transport play critical roles in gas separation/purification, water purification/desalination and ionic conduction. Despite extensive experimental and theoretical research focused on understanding molecular and ionic transport in polymeric media, we still lack a practical guidance on how to design polymers exhibiting superior transport properties. Multiple studies in the area of gas separation and ion transport demonstrated that number of structural and dynamic parameters are important to promote diffusion of ions and gas molecules. In this session, research related to the diffusion of ion and small molecules including various gases in polymer-based membranes will be discussed.

Vera Bocharova

01.01.25
Textiles and topology: physics of knots and tangles (DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.17, 03.01.23]
01.01.26
Optics and photonics in polymers and soft matter (DPOLY, DSOFT, DAMOP) [same as 02.01.38, 06.01.08]The length scales in common between optical phenomena and those readily accessible in polymers and soft matter have provided a unique opportunity: many optical techniques are well-suited for exploring important polymer physics problems, and soft matter offers advantageous methods for fabricating structures of interest for photonics. This Focus Session invites contributions on all aspects of optics and photonics pertaining to polymer science and soft matter. Possible topics of interest may include: fluorescence or single-molecule measurements of polymer dynamics, super-resolution microscopy and imaging, fabrication of optical materials and devices, etc.

Chaitanya Ullal

01.01.27
Emerging Trends in Soft Microscale Mechanics (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.03]
01.01.28
Mechanics of Soft Disordered Networks: From Remodeling to Fracture (DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.10, 03.01.25]
01.01.29
Physics of Hierarchical and Multiscale Soft Matter (DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.16]
01.01.30
Bio-inspired Adhesion (DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.14]
01.01.31
DNA-based soft matter: design, dynamics, and active mechanics (DSOFT, DPOLY) [ same as 02.01.18]
01.01.32
Morphing matter: from soft robotics to 4D printing (DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.04, 03.01.20]
01.01.33
Sustainable Polymers: Fundamental Properties, Applications, and Design for End-of-LifeRecently there has been significant interest in the development of polymers with a reduced environmental impact. Biomass and other renewable resources are attractive substitutes for petroleum sources for polymers. Grand challenges remain in matching the diverse properties of traditional, petroleum-derived polymers. Furthermore, the end-of-life behavior of polymers has come under recent scrutiny. Design of polymers with more facile routes to recycling or other end-of-life options can have a significant impact on reducing polymer waste. This focus session includes all aspects of polymer sustainability, including fundamental property relationships of polymers derived from renewable resources, tailoring sustainable polymers for targeted applications, and design of new materials for ease of end-of-life management.

Megan Robertson

01.01.34
Microscale non-Newtonian flows: Confinement, Particles, Compliance, Instabilities and Beyond (DSOFT, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 03.01.26, 02.01.05]
01.01.35
Wetting, Adhesion, and Tribology of Soft Interfaces (DSOFT, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 02.01.01, 03.01.24]
01.01.36
Active Matter and liquid crystals in biological and bio-inspired systems (DSOFT, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 02.01.02, 03.01.18]
01.01.37
Flow of Complex Fluids: Rheology, Structure and Instabilities (DFD, DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.53, 20.01.06]
01.01.38
Biomimicry: When Nature is the Guide (DBIO, DPOLY) [same as 04.01.38]
01.01.39
Biomaterials and Nanotechnology (DBIO, DPOLY) [same as 04.01.45]
01.01.40
Building the bridge to exascale: applications and opportunities for materials, chemistry, and biology (DCOMP, DCP, DPOLY, DMP, DCMP) [same as 16.01.02, 05.01.08]
01.01.41
Emerging trends in molecular dynamics simulations and machine learning (DCOMP, GDS, DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 16.01.11, 23.01.11, 02.01.59]
01.01.42
Physics of Bio-inspired Materials (DSOFT, DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 02.01.15, 03.01.22, 04.01.42]
01.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
01.03.00
Semi-Crystalline Polymers
01.04.00
Liquid Crystalline Polymers
01.05.00
Polymer Glasses and Glass Formation
01.06.00
Polymer Rheology
01.07.00
Polymeric Networks, Elastomers, and Gels
01.08.00
Charged and Ion-Containing Polymers
01.09.00
Polymer Composites
01.10.00
Electrically and Optically Active Polymers
01.11.00
Surfaces, Interfaces, Thin Films, and Coatings
01.12.00
Biopolymers and Sustainable Polymers
01.13.00
Polymer Structure, Morphology, and Self-Assembly

Soft Condensed Matter (DSOFT)

02.00.00
DSOFT Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
02.01.00
Focus Sessions
02.01.01
Wetting, Adhesion, and Tribology of Soft Interfaces (DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 01.01.35, 03.01.24]Wetting dynamics, tribology, and adhesion of soft interfaces are critical for a variety of natural and applied situations, from super-repellent coatings to tactile sensors and contact. Over the last several years, it has become apparent that soft materials and liquid interfaces can display some similar characteristics. This focus session will encompass questions related to how soft surfaces stick or slide, and how liquids wet soft or structured surfaces. Tribology has historically been separated from adhesion and wetting. However, many overlapping physical mechanisms exist that will benefit from interaction of these areas of study.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.02
Active Matter and liquid crystals in biological and bio-inspired systems (DSOFT, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 01.01.36, 03.01.18]Fascinating soft materials that have unusual properties deriving from shape and out-of-equilibrium mechanics are ubiquitous in biological and bio-inspired systems. Recent research investigates these materials at the interface of liquid crystals and active matter, in 2D and 3D, uncovering new physical phenomena in biology and soft matter. Examples include dense bacterial suspensions, cellular tissues, composite biological materials, active nematics, and active liquid crystal droplets. This focus session will bring together experimentalists and theorists to share recent progress in the physics of biological and bio-inspired active matter and liquid crystals and promoting interdisciplinary efforts in elucidating this intriguing physics.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.03
Emerging Trends in Soft Microscale Mechanics (DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 01.01.27]Microscale mechanical and rheological characterization enables unprecedented insight into the structure-mechanics relationships of a wide variety of soft material systems from polymer networks to granular materials to living cells. While traditional microscale methods focus on determining linear viscoelastic moduli, recent advances have greatly expanded the properties, spatiotemporal scales and materials that can be investigated and measured. This session will examine emerging trends in combining micromechanical analysis, microrheology, imaging and spectroscopy, including high-throughput methods and methods to access nonlinear properties, to study both classic soft materials as well as out-of-equilibrium active matter and heterogeneous noisy systems.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.04
Morphing matter: from soft robotics to 4D printing (DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 03.01.20, 01.01.32]From soft robotics to 4D printing research labs abound with examples of smart, morphable matter capable of interacting with their environment solely on the basis of their material properties. These responsive, malleable and programmable materials often derive their remarkable functional properties from their structure rather than chemistry alone. We are seeking contributions studying the fundamental and practical aspects of such morphing materials. Particularly, we are interested in (1) the mechanisms of amplification of an input via the architecture of the materials and (2) the programmability of a complex response using a simple mode of actuation.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.05
Microscale non-Newtonian flows: Confinement, Particles, Compliance, Instabilities and Beyond (DSOFT, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 01.01.34, 03.01.26]Microhydrodynamic non-Newtonian flows are at the core of many scientific and technological applications, including microfluidics, labs-on-a-chip, drug delivery, point-of-care diagnostics, adaptive optics, and inkjet printers. However, despite their widespread use in microfluidics, developing a physical description of such flows is challenging due to several poorly understood effects, such as non-Newtonian rheology, viscoelastic instabilities, presence of particles and cells in the flow, and the influence of confinement and compliance of the geometry. Understanding and exploring the interplay of these physics requires an interdisciplinary approach harnessing the skills and knowledge of fluid mechanicians, soft matter physicists, rheologists, polymer scientists, and solid mechanicians.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.06
Physics of respiratory droplets and their role in disease transmissionRespiratory droplets play a central role in the interpersonal transmission of many viruses, including the COVID-19 virus that is responsible for the ongoing pandemic impacting the globe. Understanding the physicochemical properties of respiratory droplets, including their generation in the respiratory tract, composition, release process into air through exhalation, aerodynamics, evaporation, deposition to various surfaces, inhalation, and interaction with the respiratory tract surface and mucous membranes, are of vital importance to the design of mitigation measures to curtail the spread of viruses and control the pandemic. This focus session will bring researchers together to discuss the fluid, biological, and chemical physics of respiratory droplets and how the physical principles can be used to guide the design and maintenance of personal protective equipment, frequently touched surfaces, filtering equipment for indoor air circulation, and indoor environmental surfaces. An understanding of the interdisciplinary physics of respiratory droplets can also serve as the scientific basis of public policy such as public hygiene guidelines, social distancing rules, and gatherings/events/activities management.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.07
Soft Robotic MatterSoft programmable materials have recently enabled new capabilities in robotics across length scales that were not previously possible with traditional rigid materials. This focus session will provide a platform to discuss the latest advances in materials, fabrication schemes, and actuation mechanisms to develop soft robotic matter. Within the broad area of soft matter physics, topics of interest will include (but are not limited to): i) artificial stimuli-responsive materials in robotics, such as liquid crystal elastomers, hydrogels, electroactive polymers, magneto-active elastomers, ii) biohybrid materials systems, iii) life-like materials, such as self-adaptive and self-healing materials, iv) architected materials, such as multi-material 3D/4D printed and spatially controlled anisotropic soft structures, and v) soft microactuators and small-scale robots. We especially encourage submissions from junior scientists and from underrepresented minorities in the soft matter physics, polymer, and robotics communities.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.08
Emergent mechanics of active, robotic, and living materials (DSOFT, GSNP) [same as 03.01.19]The physical properties of nonequilibrium matter can differ fundamentally from those of equilibrium systems, and mechanics is no exception. Recently, several groups have demonstrated that assemblies of active, dynamic, or driven elements can harbor unique large-scale mechanical and acoustic properties such as one-way transport, nonreciprocity, self-locomotion, and controlled amplification. While the specific realizations range from metamaterials to robotic assemblies to biological networks, they share the unifying theme that the novel mechanical behavior emerges from interactions among active building blocks. Progress in this area will involve both theoretical and computational advances to describe the elastic properties of dynamic assemblies, as well as experimental developments to fabricate and characterize candidate materials with nonequilibrium elements. This focus session aims to showcase new and future developments in this burgeoning field, and to bring together researchers from diverse disciplines to work towards a common physical framework and inspire new collaborations.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.09
Active matter in complex environments (DSOFT, DBIO, GSNP, DFD) [same as 04.01.01, 03.01.17, 20.01.13]Active matter is a prominent area of research in soft matter and biological physics: it gives us the opportunity to learn new physics (active materials are out of equilibrium), engineer new materials (e.g. "intelligent" responsive materials), and learn more about biology (e.g. cells, migratory animals, and even subcellular motor proteins are active materials). This session will focus on the rich physics associated with active matter in complex environments characterized by complex structures and interactions, which strongly impact motility, growth, and collective behaviors. This session will focus on this new direction in active matter and biophysics research.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.10
Mechanics of Soft Disordered Networks: From Remodeling to Fracture (DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 01.01.28, 03.01.25]Biological networks exhibit exceptional mechanical properties, accommodating vital dynamic processes such as cell migration and sustaining large repeated loadings. Yet, cell-generated forces and large applied deformations are observed to trigger network remodeling and the fracture of tissues. This session brings a mechanistic understanding of the mechanical response to biological networks in the plastic regime. It brings together various approaches from network science, fracture mechanics, material science and biophysics to decipher key controlling parameters. We wish to spark discussions on the implications of plasticity on cells ability to sense and respond to their environment, and how it can inspire the design of novel optimized networks that can withstand larger strains and guide cellular behaviors.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.11
Constraint-based rheology of dense suspensions and granular materials (DSOFT, GSNP) [same as 03.01.15]The rheology of dense particulate systems like granular matter and suspensions have recently attracted many researchers from fluid mechanics to soft matter physicists to tribologists. These materials display several distinctive phenomena such as yielding, shear thickening, or jamming, owing to complex dynamics at the particle-level controlling the macroscopic behavior. A consensus has emerged that constraints to particle motion play the central role in their rheology. Nonetheless, the underlying transition from an unconstrained free-flowing state to a constrained state and its connection to the continuum scale remains puzzling. This session will aim at bringing together experts in theory, experiments, and computations with a focus on developing constraint-based rheological models. To stimulate new ideas and collaborations in a field that has seen tremendous growth over the past few years, this session can be impactful by building a multi-scale approach involving microscopic constraints leading to a mesoscale force network that eventually affects the macroscopic response.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.12
Self-assembly of soft matter materials in multi-component solvent systemsSelf-assembly into well-controlled structures is critical in realizing soft materials with novel functions. Recently, organizing materials driven by the phase separation of multi-component solvents gains increased research interest. The demixing of liquids is known to play key roles in diverse processes, such as emulsification, soft adhesion, and gelation. This emerging research area has found applications across many different fields, including physics, materials science, and biology. The understanding of structure-dynamics-property relationships is important in further advancing the field and designing new materials for specific applications. However, the interactions between macromolecules in a multi-component solvent system are usually complex, and is thus very challenging to control the process. This focus session is aimed at bringing together researchers with different backgrounds and facilitate discussions in understanding the self-assembly process driven by the solvent phase separation. Recent progress on both experiments and theory development will be highlighted.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.13
Active and externally driven granular matter (DSOFT, GSNP) [same as 03.01.16]This focus session aims to be a meeting point between granular and active matter. Despite the difference the mechanism for energy input - at the individual particle level versus globally, both active granular and driven granular materials share exhibit common features, including large density fluctuations, emergence of behavior, descriptions based on effective temperature, and long-range correlations. The goal of this focus session is to bring together experts coming from both ends to share their knowledge and expertise to try and identify key features and ingredients to understand the physics behind these systems.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.14
Bio-inspired Adhesion (DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 01.01.30]Achieving robust adhesion in wet surroundings remains a challenge. Studies on bioforms that adhere to diverse substrates in marine environs have provided stimulus and charted pathways for creating synthetic wet adhesives. Yet, there remains significant room for improvement in the efficacy and longevity of the synthetic approaches. This session will invite talks on novel approaches to develop the next generation of wet adhesives that find applications as coatings, sealants, and glues in marine engineering, biomedicine, and consumer products, among others.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.15
Physics of Bio-inspired Materials (DSOFT, DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 04.01.42, 01.01.42, 03.01.22]The physics of bio-inspired materials has become an emerging interdisciplinary research topic. Moreover, more commercial products inspired by biological examples with enhanced functionality or sustainability have recently been developed and introduced to the market. This session will focus on the recent achievements of this rapidly progressing research field and provide a unique opportunity for researchers with diverse background to discuss their ideas.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.16
Physics of Hierarchical and Multiscale Soft Matter (DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 01.01.29]Recent decades have witnessed major advances in the ability to deliberately manipulate material structure and properties over multiple length scales. These advances have led to unprecedented performance enhancements that are just beginning to penetrate the industrial space. This focus session seeks to discuss questions on both the fabrication and final properties of multiscale and hierarchical soft matter structures produced by top-down, bottom up, and hybrid approaches. The goal is to highlight and connect the communities investigating advanced manufacturing approaches with those investigating naturally-occurring or theoretical metamaterials, for example, those employing additive manufacturing and self-assembly to create biomimetic architectures with those studying photonic or mechanically-resilient biological structures.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.17
Textiles and Topology: Physics of Knots and Tangles (DSOFT, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 01.01.25, 03.01.23]Textiles are some of the most ubiquitous materials in our every day lives. They are incredibly strong, lightweight and have low bending rigidity for their weight. However, very little is known rigorously about the physics that underlies these behaviors. The complexity of this problem arises from the numerous knots and tangles that convert 1D threads into 2D surfaces with 3D geometry. This session aims to target the multiscale physics that gives stretchiness to our sweaters and pleats to our pants.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.18
DNA-based soft matter: design, dynamics, and active mechanics (DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 01.01.31]DNA is broadly employed as a building block to design complex systems - from soft materials to neural networks. DNA naturally exists in a wide range of sizes and different topologies and can thus be used as a proxy to answer fundamental questions on entanglement and viscoelasticity. Further, naturally occurring, sophisticated proteins can be used to precisely alter DNA topology and mechanics - turning DNA into an active matter platform with a range of ground-breaking applications - from healthcare to energy and information storage. At the same time, the precise and affordable synthesis of long DNA sequences is fostering the exploding field of DNA nanotechnology. This session will focus on the physics of DNA-based materials, from complex fluids and gels to soft structures. Through a combination of experimental and theoretical work, we will elucidate the physical principles that determine the unique properties of diverse systems that can be made with this fascinating macromolecule.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.19
Flow of Soft Granular Matter (DSOFT, GSNP, GMED) [same as 25.01.05, 03.01.14]The flow of soft, deformable particles occurs in many contexts, ranging from biology to physical sciences and many engineering application. Think of deformable blood cells in capillaries, to droplets of fatty oils in water that make up emulsions like mayonnaise, payload droplets in microfluidic devices and high pressure compaction of particulate media to make e.g. tablets or biofuel pellets. Strong confinement and shear induces an interaction of deformation of the particulate phase and its collective flow and deformation behavior, which we are only beginning to understand. In this focus session we aim to bring together the latest experiments, numerical and theoretical studies on such flowing soft granular systems. Example studies can include, but are not limited to, clogging in silos or capillaries, creep behavior in slow deformable particle flows or for example impact dynamics on soft particles beds.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.20
Soft, Deformable, and Compressible ParticlesMany classes of particles, such as charged colloids, microgels, emulsion droplets, and polymer-grafted nanoparticles, exhibit softer interaction profiles than classic hard spheres. As a result of these profiles, the behavior of soft, deformable particles deviates in surprising ways from predictions for hard sphere particles, including in their dynamics, structure, phase behavior, and rheology. For example, soft particles exhibit anomalous dynamics in complex fluids, pack into hyperuniform structures, and form strong glasses. The mechanisms underlying these unique properties, however, remain debated in part due to the difficulty of separating softness from deformability and compressibility. This focus session will combine experimental, simulation, and theoretical investigations on the behavior of soft particles to identify key parameters and physics underlying their behavior.

Christian Santangelo

02.01.21
Fluid and elasticity in biomechanics (GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 03.01.21]
02.01.22
Network physics of particulate systems (GSNP, DSOFT, DFD) [same as 03.01.03]
02.01.23
Steerable particles: new ways to manipulate fluid-mediated forces (GSNP, DFD, DSOFT) [same as 03.01.11, 20.01.17]
02.01.24
Responsive Polymers, Soft Materials, and Hybrids (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.07]
02.01.25
Polymer and Polyelectrolyte Rheology (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DFD) [same as 01.01.11, 03.01.28, 20.01.12]
02.01.26
Predicting nonlinear and complex systems with machine learning (GSNP, DSOFT, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.15, 03.01.05]
02.01.27
Nonlinear Response of Complex Granular Materials (GSNP, DSOFT, DFD) [same as 03.01.01]
02.01.28
Statistical Physics Meets Machine Learning (GSNP, GDS, DCOMP, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 16.01.16, 23.01.16, 03.01.06, 04.01.55]
02.01.29
Nonequilibrium Structures of Polymeric Materials (DPOLY, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 03.01.29, 01.01.03]
02.01.30
Physics of Foams (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.09]
02.01.31
Self-Assembly and Phase Separation of Polymers and Charged Soft Matter (DPOLY, DOSFT) [same as 01.01.16]
02.01.32
Polymers in living systems (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.22, 04.01.58]
02.01.33
Structure, Dynamics, and Mechanics of Polymer Networks (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 01.01.13, 04.01.32]
02.01.34
Molecular Glasses (DPOLY, DSOFT, DCP, DMP) [same as 01.01.14, 05.01.07]
02.01.35
Dynamics of Glassy Polymers Under Nanoscale Confinement (DPOLY, DSOFT, DCP) [same as 01.01.15, 05.01.06]
02.01.36
Polymer Brushes and Functional Interfaces (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.18]
02.01.37
Polymers and block copolymers at interfaces (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.21]
02.01.38
Optics and photonics in polymers and soft matter (DPOLY, DSOFT, DAMOP) [same as 01.01.26, 06.01.08]
02.01.39
Immune Sensing and Response (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.04]
02.01.40
Physics in Synthetic Biology (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.13]
02.01.41
Physics of Biofilms (DBIO, DFD, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.48, 20.01.22]
02.01.42
Physics of Genome Organization: From DNA to Chromatin
02.01.43
Transport phenomena in heterogeneous and dynamic environments: from colloids to active matter (DFD, DSOFT, DBIO, GSNP) [same as 04.01.54, 03.01.31, 20.01.24]
02.01.44
DSOFT meets climate change (DSOFT, GPC) [same as 26.01.03]
02.01.45
Physics of Emergent Protein-Complex Assemblies (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.52]
02.01.46
Active Matter Physics of Cell Colonies (DBIO, DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.14, 01.01.57]
02.01.47
Robophysics: Robotics Meets Physics (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.09]
02.01.48
Phase Separation in Genome Organization (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.11]
02.01.49
Biomolecular Phase Separation (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.12]
02.01.50
Biomaterials (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.05]
02.01.51
Flow of Complex Fluids: Rheology, Structure and Instabilities (DFD, DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 20.01.06, 01.01.37]
02.01.52
Drops (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 20.01.07]
02.01.53
Active Colloids (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 20.01.08]
02.01.54
Thin Films, Surface Flows and Interfaces (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 20.01.09]
02.01.55
Swimming, Motility, and Locomotion (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 20.01.03]
02.01.56
Understanding amorphous matter through modeling and simulation (DCOMP) [same as 16.01.07]
02.01.57
Emerging trends in molecular dynamics simulations and machine learning (DCOMP, GDS, DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 16.01.11, 23.01.11, 01.01.41]
02.01.58
Multi-scale Computational and Theoretical Methods in Molecular Biophysics (DCOMP, DSOFT) [same as 16.01.21, 04.01.30]
02.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
02.03.00
Colloids and Granular Materials
02.04.00
Emulsions and Foams
02.05.00
Liquid Crystals
02.06.00
Membranes, Micelles and Vesicles
02.07.00
Gels and Complex Fluids
02.08.00
Disordered and Glassy Systems (non-polymeric)
02.09.00
Fracture, Friction, and Deformation
02.10.00
Self-and Directed Assembly (Equilibrium and Non-equilibrium)
02.11.00
Active Materials
02.12.00
Rheology and Flow of Soft Materials
02.13.00
Mechanical Metamaterials
02.14.00
Extreme Mechanics

Statistical and Nonlinear Physics (GSNP)

03.00.00
GSNP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
03.01.00
Focus Sessions
03.01.01
Nonlinear Response of Complex Granular Materials (GSNP, DSOFT, DFD) [same as 02.01.27]The mechanics and rheology of complex granular materials are routinely observed in industry and in nature such as in various geophysical phenomena. Though most studies of granular materials have analyzed moderately size-disperse spheres with simple contact interactions, real granular materials exhibit complex frictional, cohesive, electrostatic and brittle plastic interactions that are intricately coupled to their mechanics and rheology, both in dry states and suspensions. Furthermore, dispersity in particle sizes and shapes, along with the ability of the particles to fracture, can lead to complex, nonlinear phenomena such as segregation and stratification.

Gary Grest, Jeremy Lechman, Ishan Srivastava

03.01.02
Statistical Physics of Disease Propagation (GSNP, DBIO) [same as 04.01.46]Long before COVID-19 became a household name, a variety of statistical mechanics approaches were developed to tackle the problem of disease propagation in systems with complex transmission environments. This session focuses on the application of such techniques to the evolution, prediction, and control of the COVID-19 outbreak and to other disease outbreaks. The models may range from homogeneously mixing (mean-field) populations to studies with behavioral feedback and/or spatial or social structure in the population. Techniques could include network analysis, compartmental modeling, epidemiology, percolation concepts, and general nonequilibrium approaches.

Tim Germann, Cynthia Reichhardt

03.01.03
Network Physics of Particulate Systems (GSNP, DSOFT, DFD) [same as 02.01.22]Over the past few years, experimental, theoretical and computational research on physics and rheology of particulate systems have made considerable progress in better understanding the connections between different length scales - from microscopic origins of different forces to a continuum-level constitutive description of the entire system. These developments have brought together researchers from tribology, granular physics, fluid mechanics and rheology, with much of the recent literature focusing on the micro and macro scales. These have also resulted in a consensus that we need to bridge the gap between the microscopic physics at the contact and particle scales to macroscopic rheology. Of particular interest are studies that reveal mechanisms of force and stress propagation and involve mesoscale force networks and their evolution under flowing conditions. With respect to specific systems of interest, shear-thickening dense suspensions, fluidization and strain localization in granular systems, polymers and hydrogels, and complex rheology of colloidal gels are widely accepted to be controlled directly by the force and contact networks formed within the material's microstructure. These investigations should include developments of both computational and experimental techniques to resolve details of contact and force networks that ultimately control the behavior of the system. As such, bringing network scientists, and a deeper understanding of the mathematics of networks, to this area will potentially open up new areas of research and explorations.

Jeffrey Morris, Safa Jamali

03.01.04
Network Theory and Applications to Complex Systems (GSNP)Many real systems of interest in physics, engineering, social and computer sciences, biology and finance can be represented as networks: the Internet, the World Wide Web, social networks, transportation systems, scientific citation graphs, biochemical and ecological networks, and financial credit graphs are just a few examples of real systems that can be modelled as networks, and thinking of them in this way can lead to useful insights. Network science has produced many fundamental results for the description of critical phenomena in real-world networks. These represent essential tools for the control and design of real systems with concrete and practical applications. For example, thanks to the results of network science, we know how to design a computer network that is less vulnerable under intentional or random attacks, what is the best strategy for the immunization of a social network subjected to the spreading of a virus, how to identify the most influential nodes in a network, and how to drive a dynamical system living on a complex network towards the desired state. The number of real-world applications of network science is literally exploding due to the growing availability of data and computational resources. The goal of this Focus Topic is to address recent advances in the network theory of real-world complex systems.

Filippo Radicchi

03.01.05
Predicting Nonlinear and Complex Systems with Machine Learning (GSNP, DSOFT, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.15, 02.01.26]In recent years, machine learning techniques have been applied to nonlinear and complex dynamical systems to solve previously unsolved problems in the field. For example, a research area based on reservoir computing, a class of recurrent neural networks, has gained considerable momentum and emerged as a powerful paradigm for model-free prediction of the state evolution of nonlinear and chaotic dynamical systems. Machine learning methods have also been developed to predict critical transitions, transient chaos, and Hamiltonian chaos. This Focus Session will bring together a number of active researchers to discuss current issues in this emergent interdisciplinary field.

Yin-Cheng Lai

03.01.06
Statistical Physics Meets Machine Learning (GSNP, GDS, DCOMP, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 16.01.16, 23.01.16, 02.01.28, 04.01.55]In the past 15 years, there has been tremendous development in machine learning based on deep neural networks (DNNs). However, despite their many successful applications, there is no theory regarding the underlying principles of DNNs, i.e., why they work and how they work. Historically, statistical physics played an important role in the initial development of artificial neural networks, such as the Hopfield model, the Boltzmann machine, and applications of spin-glass theory to neural networks. We believe the time is ripe to develop a solid theoretical foundation for DNN algorithms based on concepts and methods from statistical physics. This focus session will bring experts from the statistical physics and machine learning community together to discuss fundamental issues and possible directions for understanding and advancing artificial intelligence research based on ideas and tools from statistical physics.

Yuhai Tu, David Schwab

03.01.07
Noise-Driven Dynamics in Far-From-Equilibrium Systems (GSNP, DBIO) [same as 04.01.17]The last few years have witnessed impressive experimental and theoretical progress to quantitatively characterize noise-driven dynamics in far-from-equilibrium systems. Examples abound in diverse systems such as active biological matter, optically levitated nanoparticles, electronic transport circuits, climate dynamics, as well as voting models and financial markets. Common features include the observation and characterization of non-vanishing probability currents in steady state, the development of novel metrics to quantify how far systems are from equilibrium behavior, the characterization of detailed balance violation - an essential feature in the functioning of many non-equilibrium systems, and the generalization of fluctuation-dissipation relations. The proposed session will bring together theoretical and experimental researchers from a range of traditional fields including biophysics, nonlinear and statistical physics, climate science, and condensed matter physics, for whom it will be stimulating to explore common sets of new and emerging analytical tools and techniques for understanding the noisy dynamics of far-from-equilibrium systems.

Stephen Teitsworth

03.01.08
Stochastic Thermodynamics of Biological and Artificial Information Processing (GSNP, DCOMP)[ same as16.01.18]The recent revolution in non-equilibrium statistical physics has allowed researchers to significantly advance and generalize Landauer's original results concerning the thermodynamics of bit-erasure into a full-fledged "thermodynamics of information processing," which analyzes computational systems ranging from information ratchets to digital circuits, all the way up to Turing machines. At the same time, our understanding of the information processing within biological cells has greatly expanded, driving an explosion of work on the thermodynamics of biological information processing, including processes such as polymerization, kinetic proofreading, and cellular sensing. Recently researchers have started to consolidate these research thrusts into a unifying thermodynamics of information processing/computation in both biological and artificial (human-engineered) systems. In addition, the community is now beginning to apply stochastic thermodynamics more broadly, to everything from social opinion networks to replicator dynamics to electronic circuits to neurobiology. The aim of this session is to continue to deepen our understanding of this important set of issues.

David Wolpert, Jan Korbel

03.01.09
Thermodynamics in Quantum Information (GSNP, DQI, DCMP) [same as 17.01.28, 15.01.01]Ever since its inception in the 1950s the notion of a "quantum heat engine" has been at the forefront of research in quantum thermodynamics; however, only over the last five years or so have experimentalists started to succeed in realizing genuinely "quantum" engines. In particular, the global push for the development of quantum technologies has sparked concentrated efforts to produce new devices. At the same time, with the rise of quantum technologies, understanding the laws governing energy, entropy and information flows between quantum systems is of crucial importance. Practical motivations are to keep a fair account of the resources to process information in the quantum realm, and optimize them with respect to well-defined performances. The question of the physical resources potentially consumed by quantum computing (whether deterministic or reservoir-assisted) has been largely overlooked so far, while it may become a bottleneck for scalability. This session aims to open an interdisciplinary dialog and lay the ground of new research addressing these questions.

Nicole Halpern

03.01.10
Higher-Order Interactions: The Next Frontier of Complex Systems (GSNP, DCOMP)The complexity of many biological, social and technological systems stems from the interaction richness among their units. Over the last few decades, many complex systems have been successfully described as networks whose links connect interacting pairs of nodes; however, it is not always possible to describe group interactions as sums of pairwise interactions only. Indeed, recent works are revealing new types of behaviors. Despite the mounting evidence showing that considering the high-order structure of these systems can significantly enhance our capacity to understand and predict their emerging dynamical behaviors, little attention was given to their higher-order architecture, and just recently, the topic has begun to attract considerable attention. Capitalizing on algebraic topology, statistical mechanics, and hypergraph theory, we aim to stimulate the discussion about how, when, and why current descriptions of complex systems can be extended to higher-order formalisms.

03.01.11
Steerable Particles: New Ways to Manipulate Fluid-Mediated Forces (GSNP, DSOFT, DFD) [same as 02.01.23, 20.01.17]The transport of fluid-suspended particles by various driving forces occurs in natural systems and various technologies. Well-known examples include the transport of charged particles by an electric field (electrophoresis), dielectric particles by an electric field gradient (dielectrophoresis), magnetic particles by a magnetic field gradient (magnetophoresis), buoyant or heavy particles by gravity (sedimentation), and particles experiencing a temperature gradient (thermophoresis) or a concentration gradient (diffusophoresis). The past several years have seen a body of work focused on new means to drive mesoscopic particles in more intricate and programmable ways using their shape, charge distribution, magnetic response, optical properties, or through tuned environments. Importantly, sophisticated driving of colloidal particles has been used to examine fundamental issues of nonequilibrium statistical physics. This category of externally-driven systems should be distinguished from that of active, self-propelled particles, which has already attracted a lot of attention.

Examples of recent achievements include: (a) demonstration of “information machines” based on programmable driving of colloidal particles; (b) transport of chiral magnetic colloids by rotating magnetic fields; (c) alignment of arbitrarily shaped objects through time-dependent forcing protocols; (d) driving of spherical particles possessing nonuniform temperature distributions; (e) stabilization of sedimenting suspensions by self-aligning objects or stratified fluids; (f) electrophoretic response of objects with arbitrary shapes and charge distributions.

The goal of the Focus Session is to encourage a broad range of scientists who work on these driven systems to get together, communicate, and identify common interests and future directions. In particular, we hope to strengthen the interface between the communities of colloids and of nonequilibrium statistical physics.

Haim Diamant

03.01.12
Computational Methods for Statistical Mechanics: Advances and Applications (DCOMP, GSNP)[ same as 16.01.08]
03.01.13
Understanding Amorphous Matter Through Computational Models (DCOMP, GSNP)
03.01.14
Flow of Soft Granular Matter (DSOFT, GSNP, GMED) [same as 25.01.05, 02.01.19]
03.01.15
Constraint-Based Rheology of Dense Suspensions and Granular Materials (DSOFT, GSNP) [same as 02.01.11]
03.01.16
Active and externally driven granular matter (DSOFT, GSNP) [same as 02.01.13]
03.01.17
Active matter in complex environments (DSOFT, DBIO, GSNP, DFD) [same as 04.01.01, 02.01.09, 20.01.13]
03.01.18
Active Matter and Liquid Crystals in Biological and Bio-Inspired Systems (DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 01.01.36, 02.01.02]
03.01.19
Emergent Mechanics of Active, Robotic, and Living Materials (DSOFT, GSNP) [same as 02.01.08]
03.01.20
Morphing Matter: From Soft Robotics to 4D Printing (DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.04, 01.01.32]
03.01.21
Fluid and elasticity in biomechanics (GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.21]Mechanical forces are paramount in the strategies that plants and insects have devised to move, morph, or respond to stimuli at all scales, from tissue to organ to organism. These forces are diverse and complex as they can be internal, external, involve flows, and are often organized in complex distribution networks. In recent years, physicists have aimed at building a fundamental understanding of these biomechanical systems and drawing inspiration from them to design new materials and structures and develop new concepts in mechanics.

In plants, growth and morphogenesis result from a balance between mechanical stresses in the cell walls and water pressure inside the cell. Plants responds to external mechanical signals when they interact with gravity, wind, soil, or water, as well as with other organisms through contact, adhesion, or pollen and seed transport. The interaction between fluid loading and elasticity and elastocapillary effects are essential in insect respiration, feeding, locomotion and morphing.

The goal of this Focus Session is to bring together scientists from diverse and complementary communities, across biomechanics, physics, applied mathematics, and engineering, from a variety of analytical, computational and experimental approaches.

Joel Marthelot, P. T. Brun

03.01.22
Physics of Bio-inspired Materials (DSOFT, DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 01.01.42, 02.01.15, 04.01.42]
03.01.23
Textiles and Topology: Physics of Knots and Tangles (DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 01.01.25, 02.01.17]
03.01.24
Wetting, Adhesion, and Tribology of Soft Interfaces (DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.01, 01.35]
03.01.25
Mechanics of Soft Disordered Networks: From Remodeling to Fracture (DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 01.01.28, 02.01.10]
03.01.26
Microscale Non-Newtonian Flows: Confinement, Particles, Compliance, Instabilities and Beyond (DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 01.01.35, 02.01.05]
03.01.27
New Directions in Polymer Nanocomposites (DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 01.01.04]
03.01.28
Polymer and Polyelectrolyte Rheology (DPOLY, GSNP, DFD, DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.11, 02.01.25, 20.01.11]
03.01.29
Nonequilibrium Structures of Polymeric Materials (DPOLY, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.03, 02.01.29]
03.01.30
Granular, Porous Media, and Multiphase Flows (DFD, GSNP) [same as 20.01.01]
03.01.31
Transport Phenomena in Heterogeneous and Dynamic Environments: From Colloids to Active Matter (DFD, GSNP, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 02.01.43, 20.01.24, 02.01.43, 04.01.54]
03.01.32
Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics in Biology: From Chemical Reaction Networks to Natural Selection (DBIO, GSNP) [same as 04.01.22]
03.01.33
Phase Transitions in Evolutionary Dynamics (DBIO, DCMOP, GSNP)[ same as 04.01.21, 16.01.19]
03.01.34
Pattern Formation in Biological Systems (DBIO, GSNP) [same as 04.01.23]
03.01.35
Data Science for Biophysics: Applications, Theory and Computation (DBIO, GDS, DCOMP, GSNP) [same as 04.01.47, 23.01.24, 16.01.22]
03.01.36
Physics of Learning (DBIO, GSNP) [same as 04.01.18]
03.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
03.03.00
Jamming and Glassy Behavior
03.04.00
Granular Materials and Flows
03.05.00
Active Matter
03.06.00
Systems Far from Equilibrium, including Fluctuation Theorems and Fluctuation-Dissipation Relations
03.07.00
Pattern Formation
03.08.00
Chaos and Nonlinear Dynamics
03.09.00
Complex Networks and their Application
03.10.00
Statistical Mechanics of Social Systems
03.11.00
Frustrated Systems
03.12.00
Extreme Mechanics
03.13.00
Population and Evolutionary Dynamics
03.14.00
Shell Buckling
03.15.00
General Statistical and Nonlinear Physics

Biological Physics (DBIO)

04.00.00
Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
04.01.00
Focus Sessions
04.01.01
Active matter in complex environments (DSOFT, DBIO, GSNP, DFD) [same as 02.01.09, 03.01.17, 20.01.13]
04.01.02
Mechanics of Cells and Tissues: The Role of Material HeterogeneityCells' and tissues' functions are intimately linked to their mechanics, and the manner in which mechanical stimuli are transmitted and sensed in biological systems is now an area of active research. A striking feature of many biomaterials is a combination of components with disparate properties. These blends enable the emergence of mechanical attributes distinct from those of the base ingredients, such as a high strength-to-weight ratio, durability, and fracture resistance. This session will focus on recent experimental and theoretical investigations aimed at characterizing and developing constitutive models of cells and tissues that harness the traits of heterogeneous building blocks to fulfill their roles.

Jonathan Michel

04.01.03
Physics of Social InteractionsSocial interactions shape our lives. Yet, their complexity challenges our ability to understand, model and even mimic optimal social network structures. The recent advent of physics of behavior studies is providing new insights into physical principles that govern social behavior: from short range interactions, e.g. plants that utilize the infra-red visual spectrum to distinguish shade producing plants from inanimate objects, to long range interactions, e.g. insect swarms who harness air-flow fields to coordinate thermoregulation.
This session will explore the boundary between such animate and related inanimate physical interactions, how social interactions are governed by physics, and vice versa, how other interactions between entities we tend to consider as inanimate could be social. We will draw from a diverse range of efforts to address it including experimental work as well as theoretical, computational, and robotic models.

Greg Stephens; Orit Peleg

04.01.04
Immune Sensing and Response (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.39]The immune system is essential to our health, and yet its understanding is in its infancy. In particular, immune sensing and response, often the first steps in widely divergent systemic decisions, present key targets for manipulation and modeling. Indeed, in recent years study of these processes has yielded increasing abundance of quantitative data, along with the development of powerful theoretical and simulation methods. As a result, a community of physicists interested in immunology has been forming gradually. This Focus Session aims to bring together a broad range of experimentalists and theoreticians interested in immune sensing and response, further supporting the immuno-physics community as it gathers momentum. Given the infancy of the field, we particularly encourage participation by early career researchers, reflected in our choice of invited speakers.

Herbert Levine; Amir Erez

04.01.05
Biomaterials (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.50]Please check out the other two new focus sessions related to Biomaterials: 04.01.44 Biomaterials: Lessons from Bacteria and 04.01.45 Biomaterials and Nanotechnology.

Margaret Cheung

04.01.06
Physics of Proteins I: Structure & Dynamics of Proteins (DBIO)Proteins are key constituents of all living cells and they play a direct role in health and disease. This session will encompass theory and experiment and will cover a wide range of topics including but not restricted to structure-function relationships, the role of peptides and disordered proteins.

Aihua Xie

04.01.07
Evolutionary and Ecological DynamicsEvolutionary and Ecological Dynamics

Daniel Weissman; Simone Bianco

04.01.08
Cytoskeleton: Actin-microtubule InteractionsThese focus sessions will explore the physics of molecular motors and cytoskeletal systems on length scales ranging from the molecular to the cellular. We will bring together single-molecule approaches, theoretical, and computational research to dissect the physical mechanisms underlying cellular function and behavior. We will focus on work that connects molecular-level features with cellular-level properties of molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments. These focus sessions will explore determinants for molecular motor function, showcasing recent work on the novel impact of cargo membrane on motor-based transport, and the modulation of the motor's load-bearing capacity by force geometry and the microtubule track. Moreover, we will explore the cytoskeletal filaments and their assemblies, showcasing recent findings on the structure and dynamics of the actin network, and their modulation by actin-binding proteins.

Moumita Das

04.01.09
Robophysics: Robotics Meets Physics (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.47]Robots are moving from the factory floor and into our lives (autonomous cars, homecare assistants, search and rescue devices, etc). However, despite the fascinating questions such future “living systems” pose for scientists, the study of such systems has been dominated by engineers and computer scientists. We propose that interaction of researchers studying dynamical systems, soft materials, and living systems can help discover principles that will allow physical robotic devices to interact with the real world in qualitatively different ways than they do now. And we propose that a Focus Session at the APS March meeting that brings together leaders in this emerging area (most of whom are not physicists) will demonstrate the need for a physics of robotics and reveal interesting problems at the interface of nonlinear dynamics, soft matter, control and biology. This focus session addresses the urgent need to establish a new field of robophysics--physics for complex "living" robotic systems (analogous to biophysics, physics for complex biological systems).

Chen Li,; Daniel Goldman

04.01.10
Morphogenesis (DBIO, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 03.01.20, 02.01.62]The field of Morphogenesis lies at the intersection between physics, biology and engineering. Morphological shapes of biological tissues and structures have inspired many scientists throughout the history. Many recent activities have focused on understanding how biology has devised elaborated strategies for regulating pattern formation and mechanical forces in both space and time. Morphogenesis has also inspired scientists and engineers to design shape-programmable stimuli-responsive matter. This session aims at bringing together researchers from diverse backgrounds to forge new interdisciplinary connections.

Andrej Kosmrlj; Zi Chen

04.01.11
Phase Separation in Genome Organization (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.48]In nature and during infection, populations of bacterial cells often exist in surface-attached, spatially structured communities called biofilms. Understanding the physical principles behind the formation of such complex communities in space and time requires an integrated approach stretching from biomolecules to intracellular networks to continuum mechanics of the whole biofilm. Physically inspired approaches at all these levels have provided powerful tools to explore molecular mechanisms and to uncover the biophysical principles of biofilm formation. In this Focus session, we will bring together a collection of talks at the interface of biology and physics, focusing on the cell-cell and cell-surface interactions in the biofilm context. These principles will be presented for a variety of bacterial communities in a rich variety of biological contexts. Emerging experimental techniques and concepts will be highlighted. The target audience is all physicists with an interest in microbiology, biomechanics, active matter, and collective behavior.

Bin Zhang; Alexandre Morozov

04.01.12
Biomolecular Phase Separation (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.49]Macromolecular phase separation is increasingly appreciated to play a fundamental role in a wide range of cellular processes. Often these processes rely on one or more aspects of the particular material properties of the biomolecular condensates formed following phase separation of specific proteins, RNAs, or sugars. An understanding of how condensate material properties such as viscosity, surface tension, phase equilibria, and aging emerge from the multiple interactions between constituent macromolecules remains elusive, as do general principles for how these properties are regulated within cells and tuned by evolution. Progress requires quantitative measurements on diverse experimental model systems combined with new theoretical and computational frameworks to both describe sequence-dependent interactions between heteropolymers on the molecular level and to account for non-equilibrium aspects of the dynamics on the cellular scale. By bringing experimental, computational, and theoretical physicists from the polymer science, biophysics, statistical physics and soft matter communities together with biologists and bioinformaticians, this focus session aims to foster interdisciplinary communication and collaboration in this exciting area.

Patrick McCall

04.01.13
Synthetic Biology (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.40]Synthetic biology is a relatively new field that matters to biological physics at least as much as engineering matters to physics. Synthetic biology provides the genetic control knobs, switches, logic gates, pattern generators and genome modification tools that are necessary for quantitatively perturbing and thus interrogating cells and organisms. Assembling and using synthetic biological devices involves biophysical phenomena at broad space and time scales. The session will highlight how synthetic biological engineering of cells and molecules provides research tools for biological physics, to study biological systems through precise perturbations, quantitative readouts, and parameter scans, revealing physical principles of biological organization and function.

Gabor Balazsi; Guillaume Lambert

04.01.14
Statistical Mechanics of Active Matter and Microbial EcologyMicrobial life is at the base of all ecosystems. Its ecodynamics results from a complex network of biological, chemical and physical interactions amongst the cells and between cells and their environment. In recent years, it is becoming increasingly clear that physical aspects of these interactions play an important role in determining the dynamics of microbial populations in nature. This is particularly true for processes that involve dynamic collective phenomena involving single or multiple populations of microorganisms, which can involve an interplay between biophysical interactions and cell-cell communication. In this context, ideas and approaches borrowed from active matter can further and deepen our understanding of microbial ecology. In this focus session we solicit contributions from researchers working on problems in microbial ecology (broadly defined) with an active matter perspective. The aim is to help strengthen the community working on microbial biophysics and promote it as an important and fascinating area where non-equilibrium physics can bring significant and unexpected contributions.

Marco Polin; Arnold Mathijssen

04.01.15
Neural SystemsTheoretical neuroscience has grown rapidly over the last decades and today it attracts a large number of physicists worldwide. Recent experimental and technological advances allow us to observe the brain at unprecedented resolution and spatiotemporal scales, opening new research avenues in neuroscience, as well as new theoretical challenges. Advances in artificial intelligence pose a different but related set of questions, as we try to understand the architectural choices that lead to good learning and generalization properties. This Focus session will enhance communication and collaboration between different groups within this highly interdisciplinary community. We hope the session will spur discussion and exchange of ideas on the diverse theoretical approaches to the problems of information representation and information processing, both in the brain and in artificial systems.

Tiberiu Tesileanu ; Gaia Tavoni; Philipp Fleig; Clelia de Mulatier

04.01.16
Physics of Proteins II: Intrinsically Disordered Proteins & Protein FoldingUnderstanding how the folding of proteins is guided by their amino acid sequence remains a core challenge underlying the molecular functioning of life. In addition, it is now becoming clear that in addition to natively folded proteins, proteins in disordered and aggregated states are of critical importance for a wide range of processes. Intrinsically disordered proteins have come to the forefront as key players in regulatory mechanisms, particularly if an array of different interaction partners is involved. Aggregated states are of great importance for a range of important human diseases, but more recently aggregation is found to also play important roles in the functional process of proteins. This session will provide a platform to discuss progress and open questions in this area using experimental, computational, and theoretical approaches.

Wouter Hoff

04.01.17
Noise-driven dynamics in far-from-equilibrium systems (GSNP, DBIO) [same as 03.01.07]
04.01.18
Physics of Learning (DBIO, GSNP) [same as 03.01.36]
04.01.19
Machine Learning and Data in Polymer Physics (DPOLY, DBIO, DCOMP, GDS, FIAP) [same as 01.01.01, 16.01.17, 23.01.10, 08.01.05]
04.01.20
Physics of Cell Fate TransitionsCells can assume different phenotypes with drastically different morphology and gene expression patterns, and can change between distinct phenotypes when subject to specific stimuli and microenvironments. Advances of single cell techniques catalyze emergence of cell phenotypic transitions (CPTs) and cell fate decision as one of the most exciting frontiers of cell and developmental biology. CPTs are examples of Rate processes that a system escapes from a metastable state, or relaxation from one stationary distribution to a new one. Therefore important contributions have been made to CPT studies from physics perspective and approaches. The session will provide a platform for physics and /or biology researchers to exchange new developments.

Jianhua Xing; Zhiyuan Li

04.01.21
Phase Transitions in Evolutionary Dynamics (DBIO, DCOMP, GSNP) [same as 16.01.19, 03.01.33]
04.01.22
Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics in Biology: from Chemical Reaction Networks to Natural Selection (DBIO, GSNP) [same as 03.01.32]Since Lotka, physical scientists have argued that living things belong to a class of complex and orderly systems that exist not despite the second law of thermodynamics, but because of it. Life and evolution, through natural selection of dissipative structures, are based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The challenge is to develop an understanding of what the respective physical laws can tell us about flows of energy and matter in living systems, and about growth, death and selection. This session will address current challenges including understanding emergence, regulation and control across scales, and entropy production, from metabolism in microbes to evolving ecosystems.

William R Cannon, John Baez

04.01.23
Pattern Formation in Biological Systems (DBIO, GSNP) [same as 03.01.34]Pattern formation is ubiquitous in biological systems. While pattern formation is often associated with Turing-like reaction-diffusion systems, biology also exploits many other mechanisms such as mechanical and hydrodynamic instabilities and phase separation. The goal of this focus session is to bring together researchers from diverse backgrounds to discuss various mechanisms that give rise to static and dynamic pattern formation in biological systems and to forge new interdisciplinary connections.

Abigail Plummer; Andrej Kosmrlj

04.01.24
Animal BehaviorThe behavior of animals provides some of the richest examples of biological complexity, and yet a quantitative and holistic understanding of what animals do has remained elusive. Recent work has begun to bridge the gap between descriptive annotation of animal actions and a quantitative understanding of how and why an animal can perform them. This includes advances in experimental techniques to record exquisite time-series data and new theoretical techniques for understanding behavior in an ecological context. This focus session will highlight current work in the biophysics of organismal behavior. We invite abstracts from researchers studying systems ranging in scale from single cells to neural circuits to large groups of animals.

Joshua Shaevitz; Gordon Berman

04.01.25
Self Organization in Active Filament SystemsCilia and flagella are employed by organisms to locomote, swim or generate flows. They are ubiquitous structures found in organisms that span a range of length scales (nm-mm) and that represent the entire diversity of the tree of life.

The principles of self organization underlying their activity and collective behaviors are of increasing interest to the biological physics community. Modern microscopy has made monitoring the dynamics of these filaments and their influence on biological function accessible. In parallel, novel in vitro and artificial cilia assemblies (magnetically driven cilia, robots) enable the study of the fundamental mechanisms underlying the emergent behaviors observed in biological cilia arrays (metachronal waves, coordinated swimming).

In this focus session we aim to bring together work on systems of these active filaments, whether biological or artificial, experimental or theoretical. We will also explore the relevance of the external environment (boundary conditions, rheology) on the emergent dynamics.

Guillermina Ramirez-San-Juan

04.01.26
Novel Experimental Techniques for Probing Cellular BiomechanicsMechanical interactions play a key role in many processes associated with cellular dynamics, health and development. Recent progress in our understanding of biomechanical interactions has been facilitated by the development of novel experimental techniques, such as Atomic Force Microscopy, Traction Force Microscopy, Optical Tweezers, and Cell Rheology. These techniques have high spatial resolution and degree of control over the applied forces, minimal sample damage, and the ability to image cells in physiologically relevant conditions. This section focuses on recent advances in cell biomechanics, provides an overview about the state-of-the-art measurements, and suggests directions for future investigations of biomechanical processes.

Cristian Stali

04.01.27
Mechanobiology of Cell-medium InteractionsThe behavior of animal cells including locomotion or decision making strongly depend on the physicochemical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in tissues. To that end, how a porous viscoelastic medium, such as the ECM or its synthetic analogs, affects the reconfiguration of an isolated single cell in vitro or in vivo requires a fundamental understanding. This will elucidate the microscopic origins of tissue mechanics and growth, as well as stem cell differentiation or malignant cell migration, to name a few implications.

The goal of this focus session will be to provide a comprehensive single cell-level mechanistic perspective for the dynamical coupling between the cell and the medium in two and three dimensional settings. To achieve that, the session aims to bring together presentations of experimental, theoretical, and computational research from a broad range of speakers with different backgrounds.

C. Nadir Kaplan

04.01.28
Intracellular transport on complex and dynamic cytoskeletal networksIntracellular transport of vesicles and organelles is typically carried out by a combination of diffusion and active, motor-driven transport along networks of actin and microtubule cytoskeletal filaments. Disruptions of transport can result in significant loss of cellular function and in disease at the organismal scale. While much work in the past has focused on the role of molecular motors in transport, there has been growing interest in how the architecture and properties of the cytoskeletal network influence the distribution of intracellular cargo. It is increasingly clear that cytoskeletal features, characterized by the density, lengths, locations, orientations, and connectivity of filaments, as well as lattice defects, associated proteins, post-translational modifications and filament dynamics likely influence intracellular transport in much the same way that road connectivity and conditions are critical determinants of vehicular traffic. These insights have been made possible by experimental advances that allow for the tracking of organelles and other cargo in vivo over extended periods of time and high-resolution imaging of the underlying cytoskeletal networks as well as theoretical efforts to account for the effects of cytoskeletal morphology and dynamics on transport. This focus session will bring together experimentalists and theorists working on these aspects of intracellular transport to highlight new emerging work, exchange ideas, seed new collaborations and create a strong community of researchers to drive the field forward.

Ajay Gopinathan

04.01.29
Biological Active MatterActive matter is a prominent area of research in soft matter and biological physics: it gives us the opportunity to learn new physics (active materials are out of equilibrium), engineer new materials (e.g. "intelligent" responsive materials), and learn more about biology (e.g. cells, migratory animals, and even subcellular motor proteins are active materials). This focus session will bring together experimentalists and theorists to share their recent progress on understanding the physics of these biological and bio-inspired active matter systems, such as dense collections of energy-consuming biopolymers, bacterial suspensions, cellular tissues, and composite systems created from biological materials or cells coexisting with biocompatible liquid crystals. The session will promote further developments and invoke interdisciplinary efforts in unifying different frameworks to elucidate the intriguing physics of biological active matter.

Ned Wingreen ; Sujit Datta,

04.01.30
Multi-scale Computational and Theoretical Methods in Molecular Biophysics (DBIO, DCOMP, DSOFT) [same as 16.01.21, 02.01.58]Biological processes at the molecular level often involve an interplay of phenomena that take place at several length and time scales. The theoretical and computer-aided investigation of such processes thus requires the combined usage of tools from diverse disciplines, e.g. quantum physics, statistical physics, information theory, materials science and so on. The goal of this focus session is to gather researchers from these fields to exchange ideas on methods and techniques aimed at the investigation of molecules and macromolecules of biological origin, such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, as well as other organic and non-organic soft matter.

Raffaello Potestio

04.01.31
Physics of Proteins III: Evolution and Function of Molecular Interactions
Physics of Proteins III: Evolution and Function of Molecular Interactions

Dongping Zhong

04.01.32
Structure, Dynamics, and Mechanics of Polymer Networks (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 01.01.13, 02.01.33]
04.01.33
The Physics of Cell Membranes: From Simplified Models to Complex FunctionalityThe Physics of Cell Membranes: From Simplified Models to Complex Functionality

Rana Ashkar

04.01.34
Information Processing in Sensory and Motor SystemsTo thrive in dynamic environments, the nervous system must be able to generate flexible behavior, seamlessly weaving together past experience with the present context to achieve future goals. Experimental evidence and computational models suggest that context-dependent behavior in animals and humans relies on the coordinated operation of multiple signaling pathways, including neuromodulatory systems and cortico-cortical feedback, and operates at multiple levels including sensory processing, memory, and motor generation. In this session, we will discuss the neural mechanisms, theories and models of information processing in sensory and motor systems and their context-dependent modulations.

Luca Mazzucato; Agostina Palmigiano

04.01.35
Immune Driven Evolution of Cancer and PathogensThe COVID-19 pandemic has illustrated the need to better understand how pathogens evolve in different hosts and how a host’s immune system drives the evolution of pathogens. Surprisingly, the ability to understand how the immune systems interacts with pathogens has influenced recent breakthrough immunotherapies in cancer. Such therapies have in turn influenced the development of RNA vaccines, which have been pivotal in containing the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Our session will focus on models of how the immune system interacts with pathogens and tumors, with approaches from biophysics, statistical mechanics and machine learning.

Benjamin Greenbaum

04.01.36
Collective Biological Behaviors Across ScalesFrom molecular crowding in the cellular cytoplasm to unjamming transitions in penguin colonies, living systems self-organize and engage in collective behaviors from the molecular to the organismal scale. While these behaviors emerge from disparate biophysical mechanisms--from mechanical forces to social cues and cellular signaling--all such collective behaviors share certain similarities and can be analyzed using a common core of powerful physical tools. This session will explore both the similarities and differences over a wide range of scales and model systems, taking a joint theory-experimental approach to identify common ground.

Daniel Cohen; Allyson E. Sgro

04.01.37
Plant PhysicsPhysicists have studied living systems across scales and phenomena, from the mechanics of single molecules and cells to animal behavior. Less attention has been paid to the world of plants-- living, information-processing organisms which use physical laws and biological mechanisms to alter their shapes, and negotiate their environments. This is the first Focus Session on Plant Physics, with the aim of bringing researchers together to report on studies of plant dynamics, including questions of how these systems are controlled by complex bio-chemical networks, how they perform mechanical work to drive the evolving geometry, and how they control and compute as a growing distributed system.

Daniel Goldman; Yasmine Meroz

04.01.38
Biomimicry: when nature is the guide (DBIO, DPLOY) [same as 01.01.38]Biomimicry is the use of biological systems and individuals to pave the way to new physics, or new applications of physics. This session is aimed at focusing on various approaches in applied and industrial physics that are proposed, or mused, by Nature. Knowledge of how the biological systems, individuals or ecosystems have often been hindrances, however now molecular physics, quantum physics and nanomaterials offer new tools to understand and replicate the work of Nature

Richard Boudreault

04.01.39
Optics across Biological and Medical Physics (GMED) [same as 25.01.04]Progress of optics in biological and medical physics is driven by development of new light sources, optical detectors, measurement techniques and analysis algorithms, resulting in more sensitive, faster, smaller or less expensive optical systems for studying biological systems over multiple scales – from biomolecules to whole organisms. This resulted in rapid proliferation on novel optical technologies in biophysics, targeted towards probing how biological systems work, and for medical physics, focused on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human diseases.
The session objectives are to synergize the efforts of biophysicists and medical physicists advancing the field of optics in life sciences and medicine. We aim to provide a broad-ranging review of emerging optical techniques in both fields. We welcome contributions concerning theoretical and experimental aspects of new device development, imaging protocols, data processing algorithms, and applications in biophysical discovery and medicine.
Topics of interest include:
o optical spectroscopy (Raman, VIS-NIR, fluorescence spectroscopy),
o optical imaging (OCT, photoacoustic tomography, spectral imaging),
o optical microscopy (confocal, multiphoton, FLIM, super-resolution microscopy)
o optical manipulation (tweezers)
o optical therapy (laser therapies, photodynamic therapy, photobiomodulation)

Margaret Cheung

04.01.40
Tackling Difficult Radiation Medicine Problems with Physics InnovationsRecent innovations in photon-based and heavy ion beam delivery systems, online imaging guidance as well as big data AI developments poised to reinvent century-old radiosurgery and teleradiotherapy in everyday clinics. In this session, we will review and discuss the state of the art for these areas with a focus on how basic physics ideas are playing transformative roles in radiation medicine. Our panel will include physicists who had prior working experiences in national research labs, but currently holding professorships in the school of medicine conducting cutting-edge researches in these areas.

Lijun Ma

04.01.41
Magnetic Resonance Imaging on Normal Cells and Tumors (DBIO, GMAG) [same as 10.01.12]This Focus Session covers the topic of using MRI to study normal and cancer cells. This is a very active research area, which clearly shows that physics could be highly useful for biomedical science. At present, MRI has become a must-have tool in most hospitals and large clinics. How to optimize the use of MRI to characterize the cancer cells and normal cells is a very challenging research topic. Today, there are still a lot of misunderstandings about how a NMR measurement can differentiate cancer cells from normal cells. Many people did not realize that the contrast of MRI image is based on nuclear relaxation time difference rather than water concentration difference. Thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms behind relaxation time changes of water protons during cancer development. The invited talks will summarize the major studies in this area and elucidate the basic principle for allowing the use of MRI to monitor the development of pre-neoplastic cells and tumors from normal cells.

Donald Chang

04.01.42
Physics of Bio-inspired Materials (DSOFT, DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 01.01.42, 02.01.15, 03.01.22]
04.01.43
Biological Active FluidsMost cells live in aqueous environments and use internal energy stores to interact and manipulate their environment for certain biological functions. This internally-injected energy drives fluids out of equilibrium and can lead to novel material properties, such as long-range collective motion and coordinated pattern formations that are difficult to duplicate synthetically. This session will bring together a wide range of topics including but not limited to suspensions of molecular motors, swimming microbes, and airway ciliated pumping. Experimental, computational, and theoretical contributions are welcome. Interdisciplinary approaches encouraged.

Alison Patteson

04.01.44
Biomaterials: Lessons from BacteriaThe material properties and functionality of biomaterials emerge from hierarchical self-assembly of biomolecular components. A fundamental question is how living systems regulate and control the structure and properties of living materials over a range of length scales, from single molecules to bulk properties of collections of cells, such as biofilms and tissues. This session will bring together researchers working on the physics of self-regulating living materials and their adaptive, stimuli-responsive behaviors, with a focus on bacterial systems as an experimentally tractable platform.

Sima Setayeshgar

04.01.45
Biomaterials and Nanotechnology (DBIO, DPOLY) [same as 01.01.39]This session highlights the recent advances in understanding the physics governing the function of biomaterials at the nanoscale. The synergistic combination of nanotechnology and biology with nanoparticles, at interfaces, and within tissues has resulted in numerous innovative approaches in clinical therapy and biological research. Yet, biomaterial systems are highly dynamic and heterogeneous, requiring approaches to control and understand their properties across multiple length and time scales. The combination of theoretical, experimental, and computational techniques, including methods development, to further our understanding of physical phenomena in biomaterial systems will be addressed in this Focus Session. Interdisciplinary topics include directed self-assembly using biological forces such as in DNA nanotechnology, characterization techniques that enable probing the bio/abiotic interface with unprecedented resolution, and development of theoretical, computational, or data-intensive tools that guide the discovery, optimization, and application of biomaterials across different fields. Non-equilibrium interactions and multi-scale phenomena are of particular interest. Overall, understanding the fundamental physics of biomaterials will advance the design and development of materials with desirable properties and functionality.

Lydia Kisley; Sebastian Sensale Rodriguez

04.01.46
Statistical Physics of Disease Propagation (GSNP, DBIO) [same as 03.01.02]
04.01.47
Data Science for Biophysics: Applications, Theory and Computation (DBIO, GDS, DCOMP, GSNP) [same as 03.01.35, 23.01.24, 16.01.22]From imaging to spectroscopy and beyond, we are seeing an explosion in the amount of data available to capture complex processes unfold in biological physics. Here we bring together communities working across Neural Nets, Computational Statistics and other tools from Data Science to tackle complex data-driven problems in biological physics.

Steve Presse'

04.01.48
Physics of Bacterial CommunitiesIn nature and during infection, populations of bacterial cells often exist in surface-attached, spatially structured communities, known as biofilms. Understanding the physical principles behind the formation of such complex communities in space and time requires an integrated approach stretching from biomolecules to intracellular networks to continuum mechanics of the whole community. Physically inspired approaches at all these levels have provided powerful tools to explore molecular mechanisms and to uncover the biophysical principles underlying the bacterial community formation. In this Focus session, we will bring together a collection of talks at the interface of biology and physics, focusing on the cell-cell and cell-surface interactions in the context of bacterial communities. Emerging experimental techniques and concepts will be highlighted. The target audience is all physicists with an interest in microbiology, biomechanics, active matter, and collective behavior.

Jing Yan

04.01.49
Integrative-omics from Bioinformatics to Medical Informatics (GDS) [same as 23.01.23]The use of multiple omics techniques (i.e., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) is becoming increasingly popular in all facets of life science. Omics techniques provide a more holistic molecular perspective of systems biology as well as system medicine compared to traditional approaches. Our particular interest focuses on the use of physical models and approaches that unify vast existing biochemical and structural data or address the opportunities of integrating these data into diagnostic tools to detect the onset of diseases. We solicit contributions on current developments of integrative structural-omics as well as bioinformatic tools to achieve a comprehensive picture of the biological or medical processes involving molecules.

Mihaela Sardiu

04.01.50
Improving Education Equity and Outcomes in Biological PhysicsThe continued leadership of the United States in biological physics research continues to be threatened by persistent inadequacy and inequity in training at all education levels. This focus session will bring together high school teachers, community college and 4-year university faculty, and STEM education researchers to highlight the existing issues in STEM education at multiple levels and provide insight into the current knowledge of best practices. The purpose of the focus session is to highlight STEM education needs to the broader DBIO community and provide opportunities for interaction between education experts and educators at all levels.

Greg Morrison

04.01.51
Molecular MachinesUnderstanding the concepts and principles underlying the molecular machines present in the cell will guide the design of versatile variants with direct impact on health, disease, and synthetic biology. This session will cover a wide range of topics including but not restricted to the behavior of the amazing molecular machines of life, allosteric-driven motions, chemomechanical action, and the remodeling and translocation of biopolymers. Experimental, computational and theoretical contributions are all welcome. Examples of areas of interest are the study of phenomena that span multiple length and/or time scales and the introduction of novel ideas and techniques in chemistry and physics. Approaches that combine traditional methods with machine learning techniques to uncover novel aspects of biomolecular machines are encouraged.

Ruxandra Dima; George Stan;Tatjana Skrbic

04.01.52
Physics of Emergent Protein-Complex Assemblies (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.45]The majority of proteins assembly into stable complexes or transient clusters in order to perform cellular functions. With up to 10^4 types of proteins in a cell at a given moment, their specific interactions and concentrations regulate the biochemical processes that are the essence of life. However, understanding the mechanism of protein assemblies and transient interactions are largely known. Investigating the physics of protein assemblies is essential for developing the physical principles for living systems from molecular underpinnings. The outcome of this focus session will consolidate talks from the molecular underpinnings of transient protein-protein interactions to emergent complex assembly at the cellular scale. Ultimately, the interdisciplinary biological physics community would greatly benefit from this Focus Session at the 2022 APS March meeting.

Andrei Gasic

04.01.53
Emerging Trends in Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Machine Learning
04.01.54
Transport phenomena in heterogeneous and dynamic environments: from colloids to active matter (GSNP, DSOFT, DBIO, DFD) [same as 02.01.43, 03.01.31, 20.01.24]
04.01.55
Statistical Physics Meets Machine Learning (GSNP, GDS, DCOMP, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 16.01.16, 23.01.16, 03.01.06, 02.01.28]
04.01.56
Data science, ML and active matter (GDS) [same as 23.01.22]
04.01.57
Physics of COVID-19 and pandemics
04.01.58
Polymers in Living Systems (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 01.01.22, 02.01.32]
04.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
04.03.00
Microbiological Physics (bacteria, viruses, fungi)
04.04.00
Cellular Biophysics (structure, mechanics, dynamics)
04.05.00
Physics of Cancer
04.06.00
Single-Molecule Techniques
04.07.00
Membranes and channels
04.08.00
Noise and Stochasticity in Biology
04.09.00
Biopolymers (DNA, RNA, biocompatible, gels)
04.10.00
Nanoscale biophysics
04.11.00
Proteins (globular, enzymes, structured, unstructured)
04.12.00
Biological Networks

Chemical Physics (DCP)

05.00.00
DCP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
05.01.00
Focus Sessions
05.01.01
Density functional theory and beyond
05.01.02
Molecular quantum information science
05.01.03
Ion and electron imaging spectroscopy
05.01.04
Quantum chemistry with quantum computers
05.01.05
VUV and X-ray spectroscopy with high-harmonic generation
05.01.06
Dynamics of Glassy Polymers Under Nanoscale Confinement (DPOLY, DSOFT, DCP) [same as 01.01.15, 02.01.35]
05.01.07
Molecular Glasses (DPOLY, DSOFT, DCP, DMP) [same as 01.01.14, 02.01.34]
05.01.08
Building the bridge to exascale: applications and opportunities for materials, chemistry, and biology (DCOMP, DCP, DPOLY, DMP, DCMP) [same as 16.01.02, 01.01.40]
05.01.09
First Principles modeling of excited-state phenomena in materials (DCOMP, DCP, DMP) [same as 16.01.02]
05.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
05.03.00
Structure and Spectroscopy of Molecules and Clusters
05.04.00
Chemical Dynamics and Kinetics
05.05.00
Liquids, Glasses and Crystals
05.06.00
Polymers and Soft Matter
05.07.00
Electronic Structure Theory
05.08.00
Biophysical Chemistry and Molecular Biophysics
05.09.00
Nanoscale Chemical Physics
05.10.00
Surfaces, Interfaces, and Materials
05.11.00
Machine Learning in Chemical Physics
05.12.00
Advanced Imaging and Microscopy
05.13.00
Plasmonics and Excitonics
05.14.00
Energy Production and Storage
05.15.00
Nanomaterials and Applications
05.16.00
Nonlinear, Multidimensional, and Entangled-Photon Spectroscopies
05.17.00
Quantum Computing and Information
05.18.00
Chemical Physics and the Environment

Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics (DAMOP)

06.00.00
DAMOP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
06.01.00
Focus Sessions
06.01.01
Disorder and Localization in AMO Systems (DAMOP, DCMP)Disorder can have a profound effect on matter, changing its properties. In quantum systems, its effects can be even stronger, for example localizing particles and causing systems fail to thermalize even in circumstances where the corresponding classical system would remain localized. This focus sessions will discuss how AMO systems are being used to study some of the most intriguing phenomena associated with disorder, such as Anderson localization, many-body localization, effects on strongly correlated transport, and fundamental alteration of phases of matter.

Mikael Rechtsman

06.01.02
Topological States in AMO Systems (DAMOP, DCMP)Topology has played an growing role across fields of physics, giving rise to new phases of matter and nonequilibrium behavior. Often topology is linked with robust physical behavior that is insensitive to perturbations, and may have applications to quantum materials, quantum sensing, and quantum computing. This focus session will focus on fundamental issues and applications of these topological states as realized in AMO systems, including, but not limited to, methods to understand, classify, and measure defects, band structures, and topologically ordered states in and out of equilibrium, and experimental studies of these phenomena.

Chuanwei Zhang

06.01.03
Hybrid/Macroscopic Quantum Systems, Optomechanics, and AMO Systems (DAMOP, DQI) [same as 07.01.14]Rapid progress is being made in engineering quantum systems of various types: Ultracold matter, photonics, optomechanical systems, superconducting qubits, and more. Frontiers include controlling the quantum state of increasingly large and complex systems. This focus session will highlight research advancing these frontiers in individual macroscopic quantum systems, as well as research coupling different macroscopic degrees of freedom.

Mikael Rechtsman

06.01.04
Non-Equilibrium Physics with Cold Atoms and Molecules, Rydberg Gases, and Trapped Ions (DAMOP, DCMP)Non-Equilibrium Physics with Cold Atoms and Molecules, Rydberg Gases, and Trapped Ions Nonequilibrium dynamics is ubiquitous, but no organizing framework exists that is comparably comprehensive as for equilibrium behavior. Many special cases of nonequilibrium dynamics are known to harbor interesting features, many of which are forbidden in equilibrium. Special cases of dynamics with recent progress include Floquet dynamics, prethermalization, non-thermal fixed points, driven dissipative steady states, turbulence, systems with scarring, and localization. This focus session will describe theoretical and experimental advances in our understanding of all of these dynamics in a variety of AMO systems.

Erich Mueller

06.01.05
Precision Many-Body Physics (DCOMP, DAMOP, DCMP) [same as 16.01.06]The precise understanding of strongly correlated materials and models is a primary goal of modern physics. Achieving this understanding requires typically four complementary ingredients and thus four distinct directions of research: (i) conducting experiments that aim at producing highly accurate data, (ii) developing effective theories addressing the relevant degrees of freedom and/or emergent phenomena characteristic of a given phase of matter; (iii) solving simplified strongly correlated microscopic models either numerically or analytically, and (iv) cross-validating theoretical predictions against empirical data qualitatively and, ultimately, quantitatively. The last decade has seen breakthroughs made in all the four directions. Impressive progress has been achieved, and more are anticipated, where models and methods from many-body physics can be tested with precision, and where entirely new systems are realized that still await their accurate description. For example, in ultra-cold atoms, it is now feasible to perform analog quantum simulations aiming at the experimental realization of key many-body quantum models and engineer novel Hamiltonians. Controllable experimental platforms also started to address fundamental questions about non-equilibrium quantum dynamics, discovering new dynamical phases of matter with no equilibrium counterpart. These focus sessions will bring together researchers who share the goal of achieving a controllable theoretical and experimental understanding of phenomena taking place in correlated many-body systems. The key topics of the session(s) may include exactly solvable models, dualities, and correspondences between seemingly unrelated theories (enabling the transfer of results and ideas), first-principles numeric approaches (such as tensor network and density-matrix renormalization group methods; path-integral, stochastic-series, and diagrammatic Monte Carlo techniques, dynamic cluster approximations, linked-cluster expansions, etc.); effective coarse-grained description of quantum phases and phase transitions; analytical and numerical methods for topological phases (including quantum spin-liquids, topological insulators, fractional quantum Hall states, and Chern insulators, etc.), and precise experimental studies of strongly correlated bosonic, fermionic, and spin systems (both at and out of equilibrium).

Erich Mueller

06.01.06
Open Quantum Systems (DAMOP)No matter how isolated it is, a quantum system always has some remnant coupling to its environment. This can lead to decoherence, but also to new features, for example creating useful entanglement. This focus session will consider advances in our fundamental understanding and experimental advances concerning of the dynamics and steady states of open quantum systems, reservoir engineering, and applications thereof, for example to quantum sensing.

Dan Stampur-Kurn

06.01.07
Trapped Ion and Cold Atom Qubits (DQI, DAMOP) [same as 17.01.03]Trapped ions are promising systems for practical quantum computing. The basic requirements for universal QC have all been demonstrated with ions, and quantum algorithms using few-ion-qubit systems have been implemented. This session will cover the basics of trapped ions for quantum computing including digital quantum computers and analog quantum simulators. This will include how to scale trapped ion quantum computers while mitigating decoherence and control errors. The session will cover near-term applications, considerations impacting the design of future systems of trapped ions, and experiments and demonstrations that may further inform these considerations.

Kaden Hazzard

06.01.08
Optics and photonics in polymers and soft matter (DPOLY, DSOFT, DAMOP) [same as 01.01.26, 02.01.38]Self-assembling materials, such as colloidal and polymer assemblies, have been demonstrated to form ornate and often highly regular patterns from the scale of several nanometers to microns. This type of "bottom-up assembly" is a different paradigm of fabrication (as compared to conventional lithography), which has particular relevance to optical materials such as photonic crystals and metamaterials. Such assembly can also be used to explore fundamental physics problems such as finding complex classical many-body ground states as well as quasicrystal physics. This focus topic will explore both fundamental and applied aspects of soft matter physics relevant to optics/photonics and beyond.

Mikael Rechtsman

06.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
06.03.00
Bose-Einstein Condensates, Matter Optics, Atomic Interferometry, and Nonlinear Waves
06.04.00
Vortices, Rotation, Spin-orbit Coupling and Artificial Gauge Fields
06.05.00
Systems with Long Range Interactions; Dipolar Gases, Rydberg atoms
06.06.00
Strongly Interacting Quantum Fermi and Bose Gases
06.07.00
Quantum Gases in Optical Lattices
06.08.00
Cold and Ultracold Molecules
06.09.00
Quantum Information Science in Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics
06.10.00
Quantum Gases in Reduced Dimension, Ladders, and other Novel Geometries
06.11.00
Few Body Physics in AMO systems
06.12.00
AMO Analogs of High Energy Physics or Field Theoretic Models
06.13.00
Driven and Dissipative AMO Systems
06.14.00
General Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics

Topological Materials (DCMP)

07.00.00
DCMP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
07.01.00
Focus Sessions
07.01.01
Topological materials: synthesis, characterization and modeling (DMP, DCMP)There has been explosive growth in the field of topological materials in which band structure anomalies give rise to novel gapless states in the bulk and on the boundaries of 3-dimensional (3D), 2D, and 1D systems. Moreover, the field has expanded to include topological phases in more complex materials such as Kondo systems, magnetic materials, and complex heterostructures capable of harboring exotic topologically nontrivial states of quantum matter. The realization of theoretical predictions and understanding of observed phenomena, however, depends greatly on sample quality. As such, there remain significant challenges in identifying and synthesizing materials that have properties amenable to the study of the bulk, surface and interface states of interest. This topic will focus on fundamental advances in the synthesis, characterization, theoretical modeling, and predictions of candidate topological materials aimed at guiding synthesis efforts. This will encompass all forms including single crystals, exfoliated and epitaxial thin films and heterostructures, and nanowires and nanoribbons. Of equal interest is the characterization of these samples using structural, transport, magnetic, optical, scanning probe, photoemission and other spectroscopic techniques, and related theoretical efforts to model key experimental observations.

Vivien Zapf

07.01.02
Dirac and Weyl semimetals: materials and modeling (DMP, DCMP)The field of topological semimetals has developed dramatically over the past few years. After the initial prediction and discovery of Dirac and Weyl semimetals – materials whose low energy excitations can be described by the Dirac or Weyl equation of high-energy physics – the field has now expanded to include new low-energy excitations not possible in a high-energy setting. Semimetals with different degeneracy at crossing points or lines have been predicted. Transport theories and effects have been predicted and proposed in order to measure a small subset of the topological characteristics of the semimetals (such as Chern numbers). Furthermore, semimetals whose existence is guaranteed by filling constraints derived from the presence of certain orbitals at certain points in specific lattices have also been mentioned in the literature.
Distinct from conventional low carrier density systems, Dirac, Weyl and other semimetals are expected to possess exotic properties due to the nontrivial topologies of their electronic wave functions. A subset of the novel properties predicted include Berry phase contributions to transport properties, chiral anomaly, quantized nonlinear transport under circularly polarized light, protected Fermi arc surface states, suppressed scattering, optical control of topology, landau level spectroscopy, superconductivity, and non-local transport. While promising candidate materials exist for many but certainly not all of the topological semimetals, many phenomena have yet to be clearly resolved.
This focus topic aims to explore Dirac, Weyl and other new semimetals and the novel phenomena associated with them. We solicit contributions on predictions, new materials synthesis and characterization, new phenomena in topological semimetals, as well as studies on both conventional and unconventional semimetals, both in the bulk and on the surfaces of samples that accentuate the non-trivial topological character of the new semimetals.

Vivien Zapf

07.01.03
Topological superconductivity: materials and modeling (DMP, DCMP)Topological superconductors are superconductors characterized by topological invariants associated with the band structure of the Bogoliubov quasiparticles. They have been a focus of significant experimental and theoretical efforts in view of their relevance to fundamental physical and mathematical concepts, and potential for quantum computation. Along with the search for bulk materials candidates, there has been much recent progress in studies of atomically thin films, artificially engineered structures, and the surfaces of bulk materials. This Focus Topic will cover topological superconductivity and the closely related non-centrosymmetric superconductivity in new experimental settings involving transition metal dichalcogenides, topological insulators, Weyl semi-metals, FeSe-based systems, graphene, engineered heterostructures, semiconducting nanowires, atomic chains and Shiba states, junctions with ferromagnets, quantum Hall states, and driven systems and Floquet states. This Focus Topic will also cover the new understanding of bulk materials candidates such as Sr2RuO4 and the emerging opportunities in platforms such as twisted bilayers of 2D materials, and advances in strategies for quantum information processing using topological superconductivity.

Vivien Zapf

07.01.04
Magnetic Topological Materials (DMP, GMAG, DCMP) [same as 10.01.09]The intersection of long-range magnetic order with topological electronic states is developing into an exciting area in condensed matter physics. A variety of exotic quantum states have been predicted to emerge, such as the quantum anomalous Hall effect, Weyl semimetals, and axion insulators. There are many open questions that in these materials that have inspired rapid theoretical and experimental developments. For example, although the exciting phenomena listed above have been predicted, only a few experimental realizations have been found to date. However, there are several candidate materials that have been proposed or synthesized very recently, some in just the last year. This will be a focus session on theoretical predictions, experimental methods that are sensitive to the topological nature of magnetic materials, and the discovery of magnetic topological materials in single-crystal, thin film, and heterostructure morphologies.

Vivien Zapf

07.01.05
Quantum Spin Liquids, Candidate Materials, Models and Computation (GMAG, DCMP) [same as 10.01.05]
07.01.06
Topological Quantum Computing (DQI,DCMP) [same as 17.01.04]
07.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
07.03.00
Electronic structure of topological materials (photoemission, etc.)
07.04.00
Topological insulators
07.05.00
Dirac and Weyl semimetals: theory
07.06.00
Defects in topological materials
07.07.00
Strong electronic correlations in topological materials
07.08.00
Topological spin liquids
07.09.00
Topological superconductors and superfluids: theory
07.10.00
Floquet topological systems
07.11.00
Integer quantum Hall effect
07.12.00
Fractional quantum Hall effect

Semiconductors, Insulators, and Dielectrics (FIAP)

08.00.00
FIAP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
08.01.00
Focus Sessions
08.01.01
Spin-Dependent Phenomena in Semiconductors, including 2D Materials and Topological Systems (GMAG, DMP, FIAP) [same as 10.01.06]
08.01.02
Dopants and defects in semiconductors (DMP, DCOMP, FIAP) [same as 16.01.26]Defects profoundly affect electronic, optical, and other properties of semiconductors. They control charge carrier concentration, transport, and recombination rates. They also regulate mass-transport processes involved in migration, diffusion, and precipitation as well as energy level alignment and charge transfer at interfaces. The success of electronic and optoelectronic semiconductor devices has relied on the optimization of beneficial defects while mitigating unwanted ones. Understanding, characterizing, and controlling dopants and defects is essential for technologies such as light sources, detectors, power electronics, quantum devices, logic devices, memory, and solar cells. The focus of this topic is on the physics of dopants and defects in existing and emerging semiconductors, from bulk to atomic scales, encompassing point, line, and planar defects, including surfaces and interfaces. We solicit abstracts on experimental, computational, and theoretical investigations of the electronic, structural, optical, magnetic, and other properties of dopants and defects in elemental and compound semiconductors, whether in bulk crystals, polycrystals, or nanoscale structures and across applications. We especially encourage submissions on (1) defect management in wide-band-gap materials such as diamond, SiC, group-III nitrides, and group-III oxides; (2) defects in inorganic semiconductors for photovoltaics, and (3) defects in two-dimensional materials for single photon emission and quantum sensing. In addition, we welcome abstracts on relevant techniques such as materials processing and advanced characterization.

Vivien Zapf

08.01.03
Multiferroics, magnetoelectrics, spin-electric coupling, and ferroelectrics (DMP, DCOMP, FIAP) [same as 16.01.25]This focus topic covers the challenge of coupling magnetic and electric properties in diverse insulating materials as well as ferroelectricity in different materials classes.
Topics include:
• Ferroelectricity in inorganic and organic materials
• Bulk multiferroic and magnetoelectric oxides
• Heterostructured magnetoelectrics such as thin film, pillar and nanostructured materials.
• Metal-organic frameworks, organometallics, molecule-based materials, organic thin films and other soft materials that can exhibit magnetoelectric properties
• Spin-electric coupling in single molecule magnets
• Coupling of spin crossovers and spin state ordering to electric and strain properties of materials
• Magnetoelectric domains and domain walls
• Magnetoelectric coupling at surfaces
• Band-filling and bandwidth control in complex oxides (a prerequisite to harnessing charge/orbital order, magnetic transitions and metal insulator transitions)
• Other novel theoretical and experimental routes to multifunctional cross coupling of magnetic, electric and strain properties.

Vivien Zapf

08.01.04
Metal Halide Perovskites – from Fundamentals to Applications (DMP, FIAP]In the past decade, metal halide perovskites have attracted significant interest from the scientific community due to their excellent optoelectronic properties and remarkable performance in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes.
While much progress has been made in understanding the fundamental physical and chemical properties of perovskites, many aspects of these materials remain under extensive debate. These include, for example, their defect physics, and the degree to which perovskites are defect tolerant. Similarly, the role of microstructure and grain boundaries remains unclear. These - and many other - open questions highlight that despite their high performance, much remains unknown about perovskite semiconductors.
Recent research efforts have also been devoted to tackling some of the challenges associated with the application of perovskite materials in electronic devices, namely stability, sustainability and reproducibility. Addressing these challenges by developing suitable mitigation strategies is of key importance for the future of this technology.
In this Focus Topic, we expect contributions on either experimental or modeling studies of the optical, electronic, structural and defect properties of metal halide perovskites.
Advancements in materials engineering and the development of practical applications are
also encouraged.

Vivien Zapf

08.01.05
Machine Learning and Data in Polymer Physics (DPOLY, DBIO, DCOMP, GDS, FIAP) [same as 01.01.01, 04.01.19, 16.01.17, 23.01.10]
08.01.06
Organic Electronics (DPOLY, FIAP, DMP) [same as 01.01.02]
08.01.07
Optical Spectroscopic Measurements of 2D Materials (FIAP, DMP)
08.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
08.03.00
Materials: synthesis, growth, processing, and defects (bulk and films)
08.04.00
Thermodynamic and transport properties (not QHE, FQHE)
08.05.00
Atomic structure, lattice properties and phase transitions
08.06.00
Electronic structure: theory and spectra
08.07.00
Electronic structure: thermodynamic and optical properties
08.08.00
Mechanical and dynamical properties
08.09.00
Electricity-to-light conversion: solid state lighting
08.10.00
Industrial microelectronics, flexible circuits, and semiconductors
08.11.00
Hybrid semiconductor/magnetic structures
08.12.00
Semiconductor materials for beyond CMOS electronics
08.13.00
Ballistic transport in semiconductor devices

Superconductivity (DCMP)

09.00.00
DCMP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
09.01.00
Focus Sessions
09.01.01
Fe-based Superconductors (DMP, DCMP, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.27]More than a decade after their discovery, Fe-based superconductors (FeSCs) continue to fascinate the materials and condensed matter physics communities, not only due to their potential to lead to higher superconducting transition temperatures, but also as a platform to investigate correlated quantum matter. Considerable synthesis, experimental, and theoretical progress has been made in elucidating the defining properties of these materials, including the role of electron-electron interactions in shaping their normal state properties; the intertwining between different ordered states involving spin, orbital, charge, and lattice degrees of freedom; the relevance of nematicity, magnetism, and quantum criticality to the pairing interaction; and the unique effects associated with the multi-orbital nature of these systems. At the same time, there is progress in understanding the unifying principles causing superconductivity and finding connections with other unconventional superconductors such as cuprates, heavy fermions and organic charge-transfer salts. In recent years, topological phenomena in the normal state and the superconducting state have been explored in the FeSCs such that these systems allow additional insights into the role of different degrees of freedom for topological phases. In addition to advancing our fundamental understanding of superconductivity and correlated electron systems, the unique material parameters of FeSCs (relatively high Tc, low anisotropy, high critical fields) offer new approaches to the design of applications such as superconducting wires, magnets and thin-film devices. This focus topic will cover the pertinent recent developments in the materials growth, experimental measurements, and theoretical approaches, and survey the potential for discovering new applications and new superconducting systems with still higher transition temperatures.

Vivien Zapf

09.01.02
Superconducting Qubits (DQI, DCMP) [same as 17.01.01]
09.01.03
Superconducting Qubits: Materials, Fabrication, and Design (DQI, DMP, DCMP) [same as 17.01.06]
09.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
09.03.00
Materials: Growth, Structure, and Properties
09.04.00
Microscopic Theories of Superconductors
09.05.00
Phenomenological Theories and Models of the Superconducting State
09.06.00
Thermodynamic and Transport Properties
09.07.00
Electronic Structure of Superconductors (photoemission, etc.)
09.08.00
Magnetic Field Effects (Vortex Related Phenomena)
09.09.00
Spin Properties (NMR, NQR, neutron scattering, etc.)
09.10.00
Response to Electromagnetic Fields (optical and Raman spectroscopy, surface impedance, etc.)
09.11.00
Tunneling Phenomena (single particle tunneling and STM)
09.12.00
Josephson Effects
09.13.00
Proximity Effects
09.14.00
Nonequilibrium Effects in Superconductors
09.15.00
Competing phases and superconductivity
09.16.00
Mesoscopic and Nanometer Scale Phenomena
09.17.00
Other Superconductors (MgB2, complex compounds, organics, etc.)
09.18.00
Superconductivity in one and two dimensions

Magnetism (GMAG)

10.00.00
GMAG Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
10.01.00
Focus Sessions
10.01.01
Magnetic Nanostructures: Materials and phenomena (GMAG, DMP)Reduced dimensionality and confinement lead to magnetic states and spin behaviors that are markedly different from those observed in bulk materials. This Focus Topic explores advances in magnetic nanostructures, the novel properties that arise in magnetic materials at the nanoscale, and the advanced characterization tools required for understanding these properties. Magnetic nanostructures of interest include thin films, multilayers, graded layer structures, superlattices, nanoparticles, nanowires, nanorings, nanotubes, 3D nanostructures, nanocomposite materials, hybrid nanostructures, magnetic point contacts, and self-assembled, as well as patterned, magnetic arrays. Sessions will include talks on the methods used to synthesize such nanostructures, the variety of materials used, and the latest original theoretical, experimental, and technological advances. Synthesis and characterization techniques that demonstrate nano- or atomic-scale control of properties will be featured, such as: novel deposition and lithography methods; electron microscopy (Lorentz and holographic imaging, in-situ techniques, time / frequency resolution); advances in synchrotron methods and neutron scattering techniques; and novel near field imaging techniques including NV center-based imaging. Phenomena and properties of interest include magnetization reversal and dynamics (including ultrafast and THz dynamics), topology in nanoscale spin textures, spintronics, magnonics, magnetic interactions including anti-symmetric and antiferromagnetic exchange, magnetic quantum confinement, spin tunneling and spin crossover, proximity and structural disorder effects, strain effects, and thermal and quantum fluctuations.

Dario Arena

10.01.02
Emergent Properties of Complex Oxides Bulk, Thin Films, and Heterostructures (GMAG, DMP)The emergence of novel states of matter, arising from the intricate coupling of electronic and lattice degrees of freedom, is a unique feature in strongly correlated electron systems. Of special interest are the ways in which the spin, lattice, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom cooperate, compete, and/or reconstruct in complex oxides to produce novel phenomena as well as novel magnetic states, often with exotic topological properties that can arise from the interplay of spin-orbit coupling and Coulomb interactions. This is further enhanced in thin films and heterostructures, where these competitions might lead to a wide variety of interfacial phenomena such as charge transfer, orbital reconstruction, quantum confinement, proximity effects, and modifications to local atomic structure. Novel magnetic interactions and ground states thus can emerge, generating exciting new prospects both for the discovery of fundamental physics and the development of technological applications.
This Focus Topic explores the nature of such ordered states observed in bulk compounds, thin films, heterostructures, superlattices, and nanostructures of these complex metal oxides. It will provide a forum for discussion of recent developments in theory, simulation, synthesis, characterization, and devices, with the aim of covering basic aspects and identifying future key directions in complex oxides. Associated with this complexity is a tendency for new forms of order, such as the formation of spin stripes, ferroic states, exotic spin-liquid phases with topological order and fractionalized excitations, spin-orbit entangled states or phase separation. An additional focus of this session is on how competing interactions result in spatial correlations over multiple length scales, giving rise to enhanced electronic and magnetic susceptibilities and responses to external stimuli. Advances in experimental techniques to probe and image magnetic order and transitions in complex oxide bulk materials and thin films (including scanning probes, optical, electron, neutron, and synchrotron-based techniques) are also emphasized. Note that overlap exists with other DMP and GMAG focus topic sessions. As a rule of thumb, if magnetism plays a key role in the investigation, then the talk is appropriate for this Focus Topic.

Gang Cao

10.01.03
Spin Transport and Magnetization Dynamics in Metals-Based Systems (GMAG, DMP, FIAP) [same as 22.01.04]The generation, manipulation, and detection of spin currents in metals and magnetic heterostructures are of great interest for fundamental science and applications. Understanding fundamental spin-dependent transport physics, accompanied by progress in materials and nanoscale engineering, has already dramatically impacted technology. Discoveries like the giant and tunneling magnetoresistance have moved to applications, and concrete implementations of more recent discoveries, including magneto-thermal effects, spin-transfer torque, spin-Hall effects, and chiral domain walls, are imminent. This Focus Topic aims to capture experimental and theoretical developments in spin transport and magnetization dynamics in metallic and semiconducting systems, such as ultra-thin films, heterostructures, lateral nanostructures, perpendicular nanopillars, and tunnel junctions. In particular, contributions describing new results in the following areas are solicited: (i) Interplay between spin currents and magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures; spin-transfer, spin-pumping and related phenomena, including current-induced magnetization dynamics in heterostructures and domain wall motion in magnetic wires; (ii) Theoretical predictions and/or experimental discovery of half-metallic band structures, both in bulk solids and at the surfaces of thin films; Spin transport and magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures (e.g., TMR, CPP-GMR and lateral spin valve structures) based on half-metallic materials; (iii) Manifestations of spin-orbit interactions including, but not limited to field-like and damping-like torques on magnetic films and nanostructures, the spin-Hall, inverse spin-Hall, and anomalous Hall effects; microscopic mechanisms of magnetization damping; (iv) Electric field control of magnetic properties (e.g., anisotropy, phase transitions, etc.), including but not limited to hybrid metal/oxide structures, piezoelectric layers coupled to ferromagnetic films, and electrolyte/ferromagnetic systems; (v) Ultrafast magnetization response to (and reversal by) intense laser pulses; magnetization dynamics at elevated temperatures, and thermally-assisted magnetization reversal; (vi) Spin dependent thermoelectric phenomena such as giant magneto-thermopower and Peltier effects, spin-Seebeck and Peltier effects, spin and anomalous Nernst and Ettingshausen effects, spin entropy in hopping systems, dilute Kondo systems due to the resonant interaction of the magnetic impurities with free electrons, magnon electron drag in magnetically ordered systems, paramagnon carrier drag, and paramagnetic spin fluctuation systems; (vii) Thermal gradient and/or RF-driven magnonic magnetization dynamics in nanostructures, including spin wave excitation, propagation, and detection; Interactions between electronic spin current and magnon propagations in thin-film and device structures; and (viii) General considerations concerning spin angular momentum, energy, and entropy flow, conservation laws, and Onsager reciprocity relations.

Ran Cheng

10.01.04
Chiral Spin Textures and Dynamics, Including Skyrmions (GMAG, DMP)Materials that display non-collinear or other complex magnetic textures are known to develop novel charge, heat, or spin transport characteristics. These properties are intrinsically related to the topology of the global magnetic spin arrangement. Understanding and mastering these phenomena may help reveal hidden order/dynamics in novel materials and offer exciting opportunities towards next-generation device applications. At large, the study of these topological spin textures is also relevant to fields as diverse as spintronics, nanomagnetism, neuromorphic and quantum computing, strong correlation, and thermal management. This Focus Topic will address the most relevant and recent developments, from materials to physical modeling and device technology, in the field of chiral magnetism. Specific areas include but are not limited to: magnetic skyrmions (and more complex solitons) in various material architectures (bulk/thin-films/2D), chiral magnetization dynamics, spin-orbit torques, the physics and control of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), DMI-induced non-reciprocity in spin waves, interfacial magnetism, topological transport phenomena, emergent electrodynamics, and novel devices based on non-trivial topological spin textures and dynamics. Advanced techniques to study chiral magnetism, such as spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy, magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy, Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy, spin-polarized low energy electron microscopy, NV center microscopy, Transmission electron microscopy (e.g. Lorentz, off-axis holography), neutron scattering, and synchrotron-based techniques will also be included. The aim of this Focused Topic is not only to promote fundamental understanding of chiral magnetism but also facilitate innovative technology.

Lisa DeBeer-Schmitt

10.01.05
Quantum Spin Liquids, Candidate Materials, Models and Computation (GMAG, DCMP) [same as 07.01.05]Quantum spin liquids (QSLs) are systems built from magnetic spins or pseudospins displaying long-range entanglement, quantized topological numbers, and other phenomena with no classical counterpart. This sorting category includes real candidate materials that exhibit proximate spin liquid behavior, as well as prototypical models manifesting different forms of ground states, including topologically ordered states with anyonic excitations. Also included are theoretical and experimental efforts towards the unambiguous characterization of QSL phases, such as theoretical classifications of possible QSLs, focused material searches, standard and novel experimental probes, and interpretation of experimental results aided by numerical simulations and first principles derivations of minimal models. Traditional candidate structures for QSL materials are frustrated networks of quantum pseudospins with particular interest in two-dimensional honeycomb, Kagome, and triangular lattices of heavy d- and f-block elements, for which strong spin-orbit coupling can induce highly anisotropic effective exchange interactions. The rare-earth pyrochlores and various Kitaev QSL candidates featuring enhanced fluctuations driven by competition between interactions on different bonds are prominent examples. The role of disorder and the development of many-body techniques that do not rely on semi-classical approximations, such as novel variational approaches, new numerical methods, and large-N expansions oriented to model the static and dynamical properties of QSLs are also part of this category. Finally, machine learning assisted efforts oriented to discover new candidate materials and to characterize QSL states are also included under this focus topic.

Hae-Young Kee

10.01.06
Spin-Dependent Phenomena in Semiconductors, Including 2D Materials and Topological Systems (GMAG, DMP, FIAP) [same as 08.01.01]The field of spin-dependent phenomena in semiconductors addresses a wide range of new effects, materials systems [e.g., III-V and II-VI heterostructures, group-IV materials including Si, Ge, SiC, diamond and graphene, transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and other 2D semiconductors, and oxide semiconductors] and new structures (e.g., quantum dots and nanocrystals, nanowires and carbon nanotubes, hybrid ferromagnetic/semiconductor structures, and van der Waals heterojunctions). This Focus Topic solicits contributions aimed at understanding spin-dependent processes in magnetic and non-magnetic structures incorporating semiconducting materials. Topics include: (i) electrical and optical spin injection and detection, spin pumping, spin Hall effects, spin-dependent topological effects, spin filtering, spin dynamics and scattering; (ii) growth and electrical, optical and magnetic properties of magnetic semiconductors, nanocomposites, and hybrid ferromagnet-semiconductor structures, including quantum dots, and nanowires; (iii) spin and valley dynamics in bulk (e.g. Si, Ge) and monolayer semiconductors (e.g. TMDs); (iv) spin-dependent electronic and thermal transport effects, and dynamical effects in semiconductors with or without spin-orbit interactions, including proximity effects in heterostructures; (v) manipulation, detection, and entanglement of electronic and nuclear spins in quantum systems, including dots, impurities and point defects (e.g., NV centers in diamond); (vi) magneto-resistance, magneto-electroluminescence, and resonance-driven spin pumping in organic semiconductors; (vii) spin-dependent devices and device proposals involving semiconductors; and (viii) spin-dependent properties (e.g. quantum anomalous Hall effects) in topological insulators and topological insulator/ferromagnet hybrid structures.

Roland Kawakami

10.01.07
Frustrated Magnetism (GMAG, DMP)Simple antiferromagnets on bipartite lattices have well-understood ground states, elementary excitations, thermodynamic phases and phase transitions. At the forefront of current research are frustrated magnets where competing interactions suppress magnetic order and may lead to qualitatively new behavior. This Focus Topic solicits abstracts for presentations that explore both theoretical and experimental aspects of the field. The themes to be represented are united by magnetic frustration: valence-bond solids; spin singlets; Shastry-Sutherland systems; spin pyrochlores; spin nematics; topological magnons and other exotic ordered states; spin ices; classical spin liquids; order-from-disorder; the interplay of spin, lattice, and orbital degrees of freedom; and design, synthesis and modeling of new materials with magnetic frustration. Also of interest are the effects of strongly fluctuating spins on properties beyond magnetism, including charge, spin, and energy transport, as well as ferroelectricity. Note that quantum spin liquids (QSL) are now called in FT 10.01.05

Sara Haravifard

10.01.08
Low-Dimensional and Molecular Magnetism (GMAG, DMP)The possibility of reduction to zero-dimensionality allows exploration of novel size and quantum effects in magnetic systems. While single spins can be isolated in semiconducting devices or by scanning probe techniques, the molecular approach introduces synthetic flexibility, providing the possibility of engineering the magnetic quantum response of a spin system. The development and study of molecular and low-dimensional magnetic systems continue to provide a fertile testing ground to explore complex magnetic behavior and new challenges for the development of experimental techniques and theoretical models. New frontiers are also represented by the possibility of combining low-dimensional magnetic systems in hybrid architectures and to study the interplay between spins and functional nanostructures. This Focus Topic solicits abstracts that explore inorganic and organic molecule-based, as well as solid state, systems, and both theoretical and experimental aspects of the field. Topics of interest include: magnetism in zero, one, and two dimensions (e.g., quantum dots, single-molecule magnets, spin chains, interfaces between molecular spins and functional surfaces), spin-orbit and super-exchange couplings, quantum critical low-dimensional spin systems, topological excitations, quantum tunneling of magnetization, coherent spin dynamics and quantum correlation (e.g. entanglement), and novel field-induced behavior.

Wei Tian

10.01.09
Magnetic Topological Materials (DMP, GMAG) [Same as 07.01.04]The intersection of long-range magnetic order with topological electronic states is developing into an exciting area in condensed matter physics. A variety of exotic quantum states have been predicted to emerge, such as the quantum anomalous Hall effect, Weyl semimetals, and axion insulators. There are many open questions that in these materials that have inspired rapid theoretical and experimental developments. For example, although the exciting phenomena listed above have been predicted, only a few experimental realizations have been found to date. However, there are several candidate materials that have been proposed or synthesized very recently, some in just the last year. This will be a focus session on theoretical predictions, experimental methods that are sensitive to the topological nature of magnetic materials, and the discovery of magnetic topological materials in both single-crystal, thin film, and heterostructure morphologies.

Dustin Allen Gilbert

10.01.10
2D Materials: Advanced Characterization (DMP, GMAG) [Same as 12.01.03]The ever-increasing class of 2D materials, with their various polymorphs, distinct electronic phases, and 2D heterostructures, require sophisticated characterization methods to both understand their emergent electronic and magnetic phases as well as establish structure-property relationships. This focus topic will concentrate on advanced and novel characterization methods to probe structural, optical, electronic, magnetic, and other properties of 2D materials and heterostructures. Characterization methods include, but are not limited to: advanced electron microscopy and spectroscopy (ex: 4D STEM, in situ techniques, ARPES, and momentum-resolved EELS), advanced optical microscopy and spectroscopy (nanoscale imaging, ultrafast time-resolved, non-linear), and various scanning probes, and multi-modal characterization methods. Theory development for data interpretation, treatment of large data sets, and machine learning approaches applied to 2D material characterization are also relevant to this focus topic.

Kwabena Bediako

10.01.11
Frontiers of Magnetic Imaging (GMED, GMAG) [same as 25.01.02]
10.01.12
Magnetic Resonance Imaging on Normal Cells and Tumors (DBIO, GMAG) [same as 04.01.41]
10.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
10.03.00
Cooperative Phenomena (incl. spin structures, spin waves, phase transitions)
10.04.00
Magnetic Domains and Domain Walls
10.05.00
Low Dimensional Magnetism (including Molecules and Surfaces)
10.06.00
Correlated Electron Magnetism (GMAG, DCMP) [same as 11.08.00]
10.07.00
Spin-Dependent Transport
10.08.00
Magnetization and Spin Dynamics
10.09.00
Magnetic Anisotropy: Hard and Soft Materials
10.10.00
Disordered Magnetic Materials
10.11.00
Artificially Structured or Self-Assembled Magnetic Materials (including Multilayers, Patterned Films, and Nanoparticles)
10.12.00
Magnetic Devices and Applications (GMAG, FIAP) [same as 22.07.00]
10.13.00
Magnetic Characterization and Imaging

Strongly Correlated Systems, Including Quantum Fluids and Solids (DCMP)

11.00.00
DCMP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
11.01.00
Focus Sessions
11.01.01
5d/4d transition metal systems (DMP, DCMP)Materials hosting 4d or 5d electrons occupy a unique niche in contemporary condensed matter physics due primarily to a combined effect of spin-orbit and Coulomb interactions. These materials offer wide-ranging opportunities for the discovery of new physics, such as exotic magnetism and insulating states, possible topological spin liquids and novel superconductivity, etc. However, the strong intertwinement of spin, charge and lattice degrees of freedom also pose a daunting challenges for observing and calculating behaviors unique to these materials, especially in the regime of the strong spin-orbit interaction limit. This focus topic covers most recent experimental and theoretical developments on 4d/5d transition metal systems containing heavy elements, e.g. ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, iridium or others, emphasizing emergent states in these materials. The topic is not limited to oxides. Note that spin liquids are covered in GMAG.

Vivien Zapf

11.01.02
Light induced structural control of electronic phases (DMP, DCMP)Dominik Juraschek (Harvard) djuraschek@seas.harvard.edu; M. Fechner (Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg, Germany) michael.fechner@mpsd.mpg.de; Wanzheng Hu (Boston University) wanzheng@bu.edu

The electronic properties of strongly correlated materials are exceptionally sensitive to changes in their crystal structure. Small perturbations of the lattice can produce novel phases of matter emerging from the intricate interplay of competing interactions. The control of atomic geometry is hence key to understanding these materials and establishing routes to functionalize their physical states. The development of new light sources and ultrafast probes has made it possible to induce changes in the crystal structure on ultrashort timescales, which enables the control and examination of non-equilibrium phases in a wide range of materials. Examples range from driving electronic and structural phase transitions to inducing ferroic orders and superconductivity. These demonstrations illuminate the various pathways for accessing hidden electronic states and address the ultimate time scales governing the formation and dynamics of correlated phases.
The focus session aims to create a platform for communicating high-impact developments in the light-induced electronic and structural dynamics of solid-state systems to a broad audience, involving theorists and experimentalists. Particular emphasis is placed on topics including ultrafast dynamics in correlated and low-dimensional materials, light-induced phase transitions, mode-selective control, and coherent and nonlinear processes.

Vivien Zapf

11.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
11.03.00
Metal-Insulator Phase Transitions
11.04.00
Other Correlated Electron Phase Transitions
11.05.00
Heavy Fermions (including heavy fermion superconductivity)
11.06.00
Non-Fermi Liquids
11.07.00
Organic Conductors and CDW Materials
11.08.00
Correlated Electron Magnetism (DCMP, GMAG) [same as 10.06.00]
11.09.00
Low Temperature Properties of Helium-3 and/or Helium-4
11.10.00
Other Quantum Fluids and Solids
11.11.00
Normal state properties of unconventional superconductors
11.12.00
Strong electronic correlations in topological materials
11.13.00
Kondo Physics
11.14.00
Quantum phase transitions

Complex Structured Materials, Including Graphene (DCMP)

12.00.00
DCMP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
12.01.00
Focus Sessions
12.01.01
2D Materials: Synthesis, Heterostructures, and Defects (DMP, DCMP)Two-dimensional (2D) materials provide unparalleled opportunities to investigate emergent electronic phases as well as to develop diverse device applications. However, research on 2D materials still relies heavily on mechanical exfoliation, which does not provide control on the shape and thickness of the samples. Thus, efforts to improve and understand direct synthesis of 2D materials must continue. This focus topic will concentrate on scalable and controlled synthesis of 2D materials and their heterostructures, covering both experimental and computational approaches. The focus topic will include synthesis efforts such as scalable synthesis of 2D materials, synthesis of new 2D materials, morphology control (thickness and size) and phase engineering of 2D materials, defect engineering (structural and chemical), interfacial effects on nucleation and crystallinity of 2D materials, and direct synthesis of vertical and lateral heterostructures.

Vivien Zapf

12.01.02
2D Materials: Devices and Functionalities ( DMP, DCMP, DCOMP) [same as 06.01.28]2D materials cover the entire spectrum of electronic phases: from metallic to semiconducting phases, and from topologically-protected surface states to layer-dependent magnetic phases. For certain 2D materials, phase transitions between polymorphs can easily be controlled via strain, electron doping, intercalation, and temperature. Thus, 2D materials and their heterostructures provide exciting opportunities for novel devices, which require improved understanding of intrinsic and extrinsic properties of 2D materials that are critical to the device functionality. This focus topic will cover experimental and theoretical/computational work related to devices based on the growing array of 2D materials that exhibit a wide variety of behaviors. We invite contributions on topics including: fabrication and modeling of devices that exploit unique properties of 2D materials, dopants and defects in 2D semiconductors, non-2D / 2D heterostructure devices, large-scale studies of device-to-device variabilities inherent to 2D materials, and interfacial, environmental, and system-based properties in the device applications of 2D materials.

Vivien Zapf

12.01.03
2D Materials: Advanced Characterization (DMP, GMAG, DCMP) [same as 10.01.10]The ever-increasing class of 2D materials, with their various polymorphs, distinct electronic phases, and 2D heterostructures, require sophisticated characterization methods to both understand their emergent electronic and magnetic phases as well as establish structure-property relationships. This focus topic will concentrate on advanced and novel characterization methods to probe structural, optical, electronic, magnetic, and other properties of 2D materials and heterostructures. Characterization methods include, but are not limited to: advanced electron microscopy and spectroscopy (ex: 4D STEM, in situ techniques, ARPES, and momentum-resolved EELS), advanced optical microscopy and spectroscopy (nanoscale imaging, ultrafast time-resolved, non-linear), and various scanning probes, and multi-modal characterization methods. Theory development for data interpretation, treatment of large data sets, and machine learning approaches applied to 2D material characterization are also relevant to this focus topic.

Vivien Zapf

12.01.04
2D Materials: Correlated states: Superconductivity, Ferroelectricity, Density Waves (DMP)This focus topic will concentrate on two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals materials, which exhibit novel emergent electronic phases such as superconductivity, charge density waves, ferroelectricity, and other correlated states. Recently, there has been much effort both in understanding the nature of these phases as well as manipulating them through tuning parameters such as dimensionality (i.e., sample thickness and/or interlayer coupling), strain, carrier doping, or proximity with other 2D materials. For instance, ultrathin NbSe2 exhibits Ising superconductivity well above the Pauli limit and a surprising two-fold symmetry with applied in-plane magnetic field. Majorana edge modes have further been reported in 2D NbSe2/CrBr3 heterostructures. 1T-TaS2 exhibits a Mott insulating state tied to commensurate charge ordering that is dependent on the layer stacking. In angle-aligned heterostructures of bilayer graphene with hexagonal boron nitride, emergent ferroelectricity caused by the moiré potential has also been observed. The ability to synthesize, control, and investigate 2D materials with ever-increasing precision makes these systems ideal platforms for exploring novel correlated electronic phases.

Vivien Zapf

12.01.05
Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (DCOMP, DMP, DCMP) [same as 16.01.10]
12.01.06
Semiconductor Qubits (DQI,DCMP) [same as 17.01.02]
12.01.07
Hybrid Quantum Systems (DQI,DCMP) [same as 17.01.05]
12.01.08
Semiconductor Qubits: Spin Qubit Arrays (DQI,DCMP) [same as 17.01.11]
12.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
12.03.00
Nanostructures (non-carbon) (Wires, Dots, Nanotubes etc): Electronic Phenomena
12.04.00
Nanostructures (non-carbon) (Wires, Dots, Nanotubes etc): Optical and non- Electronic Phenomena
12.05.00
Carbon Nanostructures (non-graphene)
12.06.00
2D Materials (non-carbon): Structure and Electronic Phenomena
12.07.00
2D materials (non-carbon): Optical Phenomena
12.08.00
Graphene (non-Moire) : Electronic Phenomena
12.09.00
Graphene (non-Moire): Optical Phenomena
12.10.00
2D Materials: Moire systems: Magic angle Twisted graphene
12.11.00
2D Materials: Moire systems: Twisted graphene beyond magic angle
12.12.00
2D Materials: Moire systems: Beyond graphene
12.13.00
Flat bands beyond Moire system

Superlattices, and Other Artificially Structured Materials (DCMP)

13.00.00
DCMP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
13.01.00
Focus Sessions
13.01.01
Nanostructures and Metamaterials (DMP, DCMP)Recent experimental, theoretical and computational advances have enabled the design and realization of micro-/nano-structured materials with novel, complex and often unusual electromagnetic properties unattainable from natural materials. Such nanostructures and metamaterials provide unique opportunities to manipulate electromagnetic radiation over a broad range of frequencies, from ultraviolet and visible to terahertz and microwave. These concepts have also been extended to enable acoustic/mechanical metamaterials and metasurfaces. The transition from three-dimensional nanostructures and metamaterials to planar two-dimensional metasurfaces further facilitates structure fabrication, material integration, novel functionality, and system miniaturization, thereby finding a wide range of potential applications. This focus topic will highlight recent progress in the physical understanding, design, fabrication, and applications of these artificial materials. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: nanophotonics, plasmonics, near-field and quantum optics, optofluidics, energy harvesting, and the emerging interface of condensed matter and materials physics with biological, chemical and neural sciences.

Vivien Zapf

13.01.02
Electron, Exciton, and Phonon Transport in Nanostructures (DMP, DCMP)Understanding and controlling how heat, charge, and energy flow at the nanoscale is critical for realizing the potential of nanomaterials in next generation device technologies. Of particular challenge, and opportunity, is understanding how elementary excitations such as phonons, electrons, holes, excitons, and plasmons interact with each other and are influenced by interfaces, confinement, and quantum effects in nanostructures. This is particularly true for heterogeneous nanoscale materials and interfaces with varying degrees of electronic and phononic couplings, and distinct thermal and electrical impedances. Structural components used in hybrid nanostructures can be made of semiconductors, metals, molecules, liquids, etc.
Contributions are solicited in areas that reflect recent advances in experimental measurement, theory, and modeling of transport mechanisms in nanoscale materials and interfaces. Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
• Electron-phonon coupling and heat generation by hot charge carriers
• Dynamics of energy and charge flow in nanostructured materials
• Ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers, excitons, and phonons in nanostructures and across nanoscale interfaces
• Charge, heat, and exciton transport through metal-semiconductor interfaces, inorganic-organic interfaces, and molecular junctions
• Correlating nanoscale interface structure & chemistry with charge, heat, and exciton transport
• Non-equilibrium heat transport and phonon-bottleneck effects
• Influence of dimensionality, nanostructuring, and surface states on charge, heat, and exciton transport
• Energy transfer in hybrid nanomaterials including dots, wires, plates, polymers, etc
• Exciton diffusion and transport in nanostructured materials for light harvesting and emission
• Plasmonic nano- and meta-structures for light harvesting and concentration
• Near-field heat transfer and energy conversion in nanogaps and nanodevices
• Hybrid structures with interacting exciton and plasmon resonances
• Hybrid nanomaterials for photo-catalytic applications utilizing excitons and plasmons

Vivien Zapf

13.01.03
Complex Oxide Interfaces and Heterostructures (DMP, DCMP)Emergent electronic and magnetic states at complex oxide interfaces raise exciting prospects for new fundamental physics and technological applications. These novel properties arise as a result of interfacial charge transfer, exchange coupling, orbital reconstructions, proximity effects, dimensionality, and mechanical and electric boundary conditions. This Focus Topic is dedicated to progress in the fabrication, methodologies, and knowledge in the field of complex oxide thin films, heterostructures, superlattices, and nanostructures. Synthesis, characterization, theory, and novel device physics are emphasized. Specific areas of interest include, but are not limited to: the growth of novel oxide thin films and heterostructures; the control of magnetic, electronic, ordering, ionic conduction, phase transitions, interfacial superconductivity, multiferroicity, magnetotransport, spin-orbit coupling properties; and developments in theoretical prediction and materials-by-design approaches. Advances in techniques to probe and image electronic, structural, and magnetic states at heterostructure interfaces are also emphasized. Note that overlap exists with other DMP and GMAG focus sessions. As a rule of thumb, if complex oxides and their heterostructures are at the core of the investigation, then the talk is appropriate for this focus topic.

Vivien Zapf

13.01.04
Materials for Quantum Information Science (DMP, DCMP, DQI) [same as 17.01.33]Technologies for processing of information are at a cross-road. Until now, advances in information processing have been mainly achieved by miniaturization and integration, such as scaling down transistor-based semiconductor technologies and heterogeneous integration in an architecture, the traditional methodology is rapidly approaching its physical limits. A new class of information processing that explores possibilities beyond classical computing architectures is now underway with particular emphasis on quantum phenomena that complement existing computing architectures. Quantum information processing, revolutionizing ways of generation, transmission, and computation of information, must be physically implemented by appropriate materials. To that end, new materials and physical properties are needed along with close collaborations among physicists, materials scientists, and electrical engineers. This Focus Topic intersects the materials discovery, devices physics, and nanoscale structure communities for quantum information processing (QIP) within the common theme of understanding the underlying physical interactions in materials for quantum information processing. Given the exploratory nature of this field, contributions are solicited broadly among the following topics:
• Superconducting materials and devices
• Trapped ion systems
• Solid-state artificial atoms (quantum dots, quantum wells)
• Solid-state quantum defects (point-defects in wide-gap semiconductors, rare-earth ions)
• 2D materials and defects in 2D materials
• Topological materials
• Hybrid quantum systems
• Magnetic systems including molecular magnets and molecular spin qubits
• Optical quantum computing devices
• Biological, polymer, or inorganic materials for QIP
• First principles theory/simulations of QIP materials.
Other ideas that may be exploratory and less well defined at this time are also encouraged; however, suitable talks for this focus topic should focus on the (quantum) materials and physics germane to QIP.

Vivien Zapf

13.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
13.03.00
Artificially Structured Materials and Interfaces: Growth, Structure, Properties, and Defects
13.04.00
Superlattices
13.05.00
Metamaterials

Surfaces, Interfaces, and Thin Films (DCMP)

14.00.00
DCMP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
14.01.00
Focus Sessions
14.01.01
14.01.01 Fundamental electronic processes and the role of interfaces in organic semiconductor devices (DMP, DCMP)Weak intermolecular interactions governing the structure and microscopic charge and energy dynamics in organic molecular solids represent a challenge for establishing physical mechanisms that control optoelectronic properties of these materials. Development of next-generation organic optoelectronic devices, including high-performance transistors, solar cells, designer sensors and detectors, as well as bioelectronic devices, would require an in-depth understanding of these microscopic processes. This Focus Topic will convene to discuss new experimental and theoretical results aimed at the fundamental and applied (photo)physics underpinning the optoelectronic processes occurring in well-ordered organic semiconductor devices. Research of interest includes structural studies, epitaxial crystalline growth, structure-property relationships for charge carrier and exciton dynamics, strain engineering, electronic surface functionalization with molecular adlayers and dopants, monolayer assemblies, thin films, crystals, and nanostructures. A specific emphasis will be made on the role of surfaces and interfaces in the elementary electronic processes, including charge and exciton injection, recombination, exciton dissociation, as well as charge and exciton transport.

Vivien Zapf

14.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
14.03.00
Thin Film Growth and Processing
14.04.00
Structure and Morphology
14.05.00
Reactions, Kinetics and Dynamics
14.06.00
Electronic and Lattice Properties

Nonequilibrium Quantum Physics (DCMP)

15.00.00
Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
15.01.00
Focus Sessions
15.01.01
Thermodynamics in quantum information (DQI, GSNP, DCMP) [same as 03.01.09, 17.01.28]
15.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
15.03.00
Quench dynamics and Kibble-Zurek Physics
15.04.00
Many-body Localization
15.05.00
Nonequilibrium Topological Systems
15.06.00
Non-Topological Flouquet Systems
15.07.00
Quantum devices - junctions, resonators, SQUIDs, Qubits
15.08.00
Heat Transport in Quantum Devices
15.09.00
Dynamics of Integrable Systems

General Theory, Computational Physics (DCOMP)

16.00.00
DCOMP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
16.01.00
Focus Sessions
16.01.01
Matter at Extreme Conditions (DCOMP, DMP, GSCCM) [same as 18.01.01]
16.01.02
Building the bridge to exascale: applications and opportunities for materials, chemistry, and biology (DCOMP, DCP, DPOLY, DMP, DCMP) [same as 05.01.08, 01.01.40]The expanding landscape of high-performance scientific computing plays a critical role in modern scientific discovery through a merging of simulation, modeling, and experimental data workflows. Artificial intelligence (AI) is accelerating demand for capabilities at high-performance computing (HPC) facilities around the world. Computers are at the dawning of the Exascale Era where exascale performance (i.e., 10^18 floating-point operations per second) is combined with AI, large data sets, and scalable simulation codes to extend performance achievements in the post-Moore’s law era. This focus session will bring together researchers with experience in using high-performance cyberinfrastructure, including supercomputers, communication networks, data resources, and scalable workflows to achieve breakthrough scientific results in materials, biological, and materials physics. This includes researchers at experimental facilities such as light sources, neutron sources, and microscopy facilities with extreme data-science requirements, including machine-learning approaches, and researchers in computational materials, computational chemistry and computational biophysics with experience in large-scale simulations. Software-development projects preparing a variety of physics applications for exascale-class machines will also be presented. This session will highlight forefront examples of the state-of-the-art in computational physics today leveraging large, national-scale infrastructure.

Jack Wells

16.01.03
Electrons, phonons, electron-phonon scattering, and phononics (DCOMP, DMP)Electron-phonon interactions play a central role in many phenomena, most classically the resistivity of metals at ordinary temperatures, and are important for electrical and thermal conductivity of thermoelectrics, the temperature dependence of the optical band gaps of semiconductors, and other phenomena such as phonon drag. This focus topic covers electron-phonon interactions emphasizing fundamental physics, direct computation, first principles and phenomenological theory, optical and phonon spectroscopy and novel effects in nanostructures, nanodevices, 2D materials, and bulk materials. This focus topic also includes the emerging area of phononics, in particular manipulating phonon eigenstates, coherent superpositions and non-linearities, for example for logical operations or to manipulate sound or heat in unconventional ways or topological acoustic materials, including active materials.

David Singh

16.01.04
First Principles modeling of excited-state phenomena in materials (DCOMP, DCP, DMP) [same as 05.01.09]Many properties of functional materials, including bulk and two-dimensional materials and their interfaces, as well as quantum and topological materials, derive from excited-state phenomena. These processes determine properties such as band gaps, excitonic effects, electron-phonon couplings, and out-of-equilibrium dynamics of charge, spin, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom and their couplings. Gaining deeper insight into these properties will advance our fundamental understanding of electronic structure theory beyond ground-state phenomena, and will underpin the design of new and improved materials for applications in energy-efficient electronics, solid-state lighting, solar photovoltaics, photocatalysis, and quantum technologies.

Predictive calculations of electronic excitations require theoretical frameworks that go beyond ground state density functional theory (DFT). In recent years, Green’s function based many-body perturbation theory methods like RPA, GW, BSE and beyond GW/BSE have been adopted by a rapidly growing community of researchers in the field of computational materials physics. These have now become the de facto standard for the description of excited electronic states in solids and their surfaces. Ehrenfest dynamics and surface-hopping schemes, e.g. based on time-dependent DFT, are used to describe coupled electron-ion dynamics as the origin of interesting physics in photo- catalysis, surface chemical reactions, scintillators, or radiation shielding. Nonequilibrium Green’s Function methods with many-body interactions from first-principles can be promising to tackle complex ultrafast and out-of-equilibrium quantum dynamics of excitons, electrons, phonons and spin. The description of electron-phonon and spin-phonon interactions using many-body Green’s function and density-matrix methods is also becoming increasingly popular.

Advances in high performance computing and scalable implementations in several popular electronic structure packages enable further progress. Sophisticated calculations are accessible for many users and feasible for large, complex systems with up to a few hundred atoms. Coupling with machine learning methods, the computational cost of excited state calculations can be further lowered by orders of magnitude. These methods are increasingly applied to interpret experiments, such as spectroscopies and femto- second pump-probe measurements, and to computationally design functional materials, interfaces, and nano-structures.

This focus topic is dedicated to recent advances in many-body perturbation theory and the theory of electron-phonon interactions in the excited state: challenges, scalable implementations in electronic structure codes, new machine learning and data-driven approaches, and applications to functional materials, two-dimensional materials and their interfaces, and quantum and topological materials. It aims to attract researchers working on the nexus of electronic and optical properties of materials, electron-phonon interactions, as well as materials and device physics.

Yuan Ping

16.01.05
Machine learning for quantum matter (DCOMP, GDS, DMP) [same as 23.01.09]Quantum matter, the research field studying states of matter whose properties are intrinsically quantum mechanical, draws from areas as diverse as hard condensed matter physics, quantum information, quantum gravity, and large-scale numerical simulations. Recently, condensed matter, quantum information, material science, and atomic, molecular, and optical physics communities have turned their attention to the algorithms underlying modern machine learning, with an eye on making progress in quantum matter research. This has led to several breakthroughs where machine learning algorithms are used, for example, to study large-scale materials with unprecedented accuracy. Other examples concern the ab-initio simulation of electronic structure problems. As evidenced by the community embracing a wide array of activities related to research at the intersection of machine learning and quantum mechanics (e.g. KITP program on Machine Learning for Quantum Many-Body Physics, Machine Learning for Physics and the Physics of Learning at IPAM/UCLA, Machine learning for quantum design at Perimeter Institute, Machine Learning for Quantum Simulation at Flatiron Institute, ELLIS Quantum Machine Learning, NEURIPS workshop on machine learning and the physical sciences), as well as the continuous appearance of increasingly creative research activity in this area, it is clear that over the next few years, machine learning will become very important for the computational study of condensed matter, quantum information, and other areas of quantum physics.

Giuseppe Carleo

16.01.06
Precision many-body physics (DCOMP, DAMOP, DCMP) [same as 06.01.05]Precise understanding of strongly correlated materials and models is a major goal of modern physics. Achieving this understanding normally requires four complementary ingredients and thus four distinct directions of research: (i) conducting experiments that aim at producing highly accurate data, (ii) developing effective theories addressing the relevant degrees of freedom and/or emergent phenomena characteristic of a given phase of matter; (iii) solving simplified strongly correlated microscopic models either numerically or analytically, and (iv) cross-validating theoretical predictions against empirical data qualitatively and, ultimately, quantitatively. The last decade has seen breakthroughs made in all the four directions. An impressive progress has been achieved, and more is anticipated, where models and methods from many-body physics can be tested with precision, and where entirely new systems are realized that still await their accurate description. For example, in the field of ultra-cold atoms it is now feasible to perform analog quantum simulations aiming at experimental realization of key many-body quantum models and engineer novel Hamiltonians. Controllable experimental platforms also started to address fundamental questions about non-equilibrium quantum dynamics, discovering new dynamical phases of matter with no equilibrium counterpart. The proposal is to organize focus sessions that will bring together researchers who share the goal of achieving controllable theoretical and experimental understanding of phenomena taking place in correlated many-body systems. The key topics of the session(s) may include exactly solvable models, dualities and correspondences between seemingly unrelated theories (enabling the transfer of results and ideas), first-principles numeric approaches (such as tensor network and density-matrix renormalization group methods; path-integral, stochastic-series, and diagrammatic Monte Carlo techniques, dynamic cluster approximations, linked-cluster expansions, etc.); effective coarse-grained description of quantum phases and phase transitions; analytical and numerical methods for topological phases (including quantum spin-liquids, topological insulators, fractional quantum Hall states, and Chern insulators, etc.), and precise experimental studies of strongly correlated bosonic, fermionic, and spin systems (both at and out of equilibrium).

Tigran Sedrakyan

16.01.07
Understanding Amorphous Matter Through Modeling and Simulation (DCOMP, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.56]Simulations of complex models of disordered matter such as glasses, poly-disperse colloidal aggregates, amorphous polymers, dense suspensions, and granular packings have provided much insight into their underlying physics. Surprisingly, robust structural features can be discerned to arise in systems that otherwise seem to be entirely random by nature. Concepts related to non-equilibrium thermodynamics, energy landscapes, polymer entanglement are some examples that have been elucidated by carefully constructed computational investigations. New algorithms for optimizing and exploring structural, mechanical, rheological properties of disordered systems continue to emerge, providing tools for addressing these ubiquitous materials systems. This session will discuss applications of established computational methods toward the study of these systems as well as development of novel algorithms that hold the promise of overcoming limitations of current simulation strategies.

Joerg Rottler

16.01.08
Computational methods for statistical mechanics: advances and applications (DCOMP, GSNP) [same as 03.01.12]Systems with a large number of degrees of freedom are fundamental for describing macroscopic behavior in a wide area of physical sciences and beyond. Consequently, statistical mechanics is one of the foundational theories for describing systems with disorder, limited microscopic knowledge and at finite temperature. Computer simulations are indispensable to advance understanding in these areas. In conjunction with modern computer architectures, new and improved algorithms and methodologies are being developed to enable increased computational performance and accuracy and the study of more complex physical problems. The main focus of this session will be on new methods and capabilities of Monte-Carlo, Molecular-Dynamics and Spin-Dynamics methods and their application. This Focus Session aims to provide a platform to bring together researchers from different disciplines to discuss and showcase recent advancements in computational statistical physics, as well as their applications to research problems at the frontier of computational physics.
Topics include (but are not limited to): simulation algorithms or techniques in computational statistical mechanics and their related studies; implementation techniques for modern computer architectures (e.g. GPUs or many-core processors); theoretical studies and discoveries aided or enhanced by computer simulations; applications of computational statistical mechanics to the study of thermodynamics, phase stability and transitions, critical phenomena at equilibrium, disorder driven phenomena, non-equilibrium, or irreversible processes for physical systems such as spin models, solid state systems, polymers and biological systems.

Markus Eisenbach

16.01.09
Real-space methods for the electronic structure problem: new algorithms and applications (DCOMP)Many interesting material properties can be understood and predicted by computation involving a solution of the electronic structure problem. The combination of new algorithms applied to high performance computing platforms promises a number of potential advances in the understanding of the theory of complex materials and in the analysis of new experimental work on advanced materials. Yet, solution of the electronic structure problem remains computationally challenging when the system of interest contains a large number (thousands) of atoms. Real-space numerical electronic structure methods are mathematically robust, accurate and ideally suited for contemporary massively parallel computational resources. Real space methods have successfully been applied to both ground state and excited states, especially for localized systems such as nanoscale structures. New algorithms have been developed to optimize solutions to eigenvalue problems and expedite or circumvent the computation of empty states in excited state computations. Topics in this focus session include but are not limited to: real space or grid based methods using finite differencing, finite elements, or variations thereof; applications to large nanoscale systems, ab initio molecular dynamics, noncollinear magnetic systems, optical excitations, and molecular transport; new algorithms designed for expediting and applying these methods to state of the art computational platforms.

Jim Chelikowsky

16.01.10
Computational design and discovery of novel materials (DCOMP, DMP) [same as 12.01.05]The availability and improvements in high-performance computing and the development of advanced computational algorithms and techniques accelerate the discovery and rational design of functional materials. They also enable high-throughput calculations for rapid screening of novel materials with desired functionalities and properties, building material databases to apply artificial intelligence and data science techniques. This focus topic will cover research efforts in the developments and applications of methodologies for materials discovery by using novel data-driven approaches and machine learning methods to design materials with specific and targeted functional properties from first principles data. The focus topic concentrates on computational materials design and discovery, development of accessible and sustainable data infrastructure, development of new data analytic tools and statistical algorithms, advanced simulations of material properties in conjunction with new device functionality, uncertainty quantification; advances in predictive modeling that leverage machine learning and data mining, algorithms for global structure and property optimizations, and computational modeling of materials synthesis. The technical applications include but are not limited to electronic and optoelectronic materials, magnetism and spintronics, quantum materials, energy conversion and storage, complex alloys, and low-dimensional materials.

Richard G. Hennig

16.01.11
Emerging trends in molecular dynamics simulations and machine learning (DCOMP, GDS, DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 23.01.11, 02.01.57, 01.01.41]Recent advances in deep learning has created a mini-revolution in all areas of Physics. Deep Learning (DL) has accelerated determination of complex energy landscapes, and stimulated algorithm design and data analytics. Availability of exascale machines within 1-2 years will make it easier to model hard and soft materials and biological systems with deep learning in conjunction with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Multimillion-to-billion atom MD simulations with DL trained on ab initio quantum mechanical simulations can reliably describe charge transfer, bond breaking/bond formation, and chemical reactions in materials under normal and extreme operating conditions. Generative models such as variational autoencoder (VAE) and generative adversarial networks (GAN) are very powerful DL models and have shown great success in creating material atomic structure for a desired property. Reinforcement learning (RL) is another widely used technique in DL domain, which is more suitable for these problems involving an optimization task and a sequential decision making under uncertainty. For examples, RL models have been used to predict reaction pathways, optimal conditions for chemical reactions and even design polymers with desired physical properties. Combining coarse grained and atomistic modeling with DL methods enable high throughput screening of materials. Accelerated dynamics approaches have enabled MD simulations to reach sufficiently long-time scales to study rare events. Novel task parallel frameworks are emerging for the analysis of peta-to-exascale DL-MD simulations.

Invited and contributed presentations in focus sessions will cover a wide range of topics that include but are not limited to:
1. Deep learning for energy landscapes and force field development
2. On-the-fly coarse and fine graining of MD simulations
3. Accelerated dynamics using reinforcement learning
4. Materials design using VAE and GAN
5. Peta-to-exascale algorithms for hybrid deep learning and MD simulations

Priya Vashishta

16.01.12
Modeling the electrochemical interface and aqueous solutions (DCOMP)This session will focus on understanding the microscopic mechanisms that drive the
function of electrochemical and photoelectro-chemical interfaces.These include metallic and semiconducting interfaces.
Specific topics that will be covered are: electro-catalysis, photocatalysis, electrochemistry and ionic transport at these interfaces.The session will welcome talks that focus both on method development and applications, including the search for more efficient functional interfaces.

Marivi Fernandez-Serra

16.01.13
Extreme-Scale Computational Science Discovery in Fluid Dynamics and Related Disciplines (DCOMP, DFD)[same as 20.01.26]Computational Physics is a broad, interdisciplinary field of research, which involves the development of computational techniques and the analysis of large datasets combined with theory, experiments and modeling, in concert with the so-called domain sciences. One important and itself broad field of science represented by APS is fluid dynamics, where researchers have long embraced scientific computing based on partial differential equations, but have may have been somewhat late in recognizing the potential of machine-learning and artificial intelligence, which appear to be paradigms of rapidly increasing importance. This focused section will cover three main themes: (a) Progress in extreme-scale HPC techniques for fluid flow problems. (b) Challenges in enabling access to massive data sets for non-HPC researchers, and (c) Machine learning, artificial intelligence and data analytics as applied to fluid dynamics.

P.K Yeung

16.01.14
Higher-order interactions: the next frontier of complex systems (GSNP, DCOMP) [same as 03.01.10]
16.01.15
Predicting nonlinear and complex systems with machine learning (GSNP, DSOFT, DCOMP) [same as 02.01.26, 03.01.05)
16.01.16
Statistical physics meets machine learning (GSNP, GDS, DCMP, DCOMP, DBIO, DSOFT)[same as 03.01.06, 23.01.16, 02.01.28, 04.01.55]
16.01.17
Machine learning and data in polymer physics (DPOLY, DBIO, DCOMP, GDS, FIAP) [same as 01.01.01, 04.01.19, 23.01.10, 08.01.05]
16.01.18
Stochastic thermodynamics of biological and artificial information processing (GSNP, DBIO, DCOMP) [same as 03.01.08]
16.01.19
Phase Transitions in Evolutionary Dynamics (DBIO, DCOMP, GSNP) [same as 03.01.33, 04.01.21]
16.01.20
Molecular, Ion, and Thermal Transport in Polymers (DPOLY, DCOMP) [same as 01.01.24]
16.01.21
Multi-scale Computational and Theoretical Methods in Molecular Biophysics (DCOMP, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.30, 02.01.58]
16.01.22
Data Science for Biophysics: applications, theory and computation (DBIO, DCOMP, GDS, GSNP) [same as 23.01.24 03.01.35, 04.01.47]
16.01.23
Noisy Intermediate Scale Quantum Computers (DQI, DCOMP) [same as 17.01.16]
16.01.24
2D Materials: Semiconductors (DMP, DCOMP) [same as 12.01.02]
16.01.25
Multiferroics, magnetoelectrics, spin-electric coupling, and ferroelectrics (DMP, DCOMP, FIAP) [same as 08.01.03]
16.01.26
Dopants and defects in semiconductors (DMP, DCOMP, FIAP) [same as 08.01.02]
16.01.27
Fe-based superconductors (DMP, DCMP, DCOMP) [same as 09.01.01]
16.01.28
2D Materials: Devices and Functionalities (DMP, DCOMP) [same as 12.01.02]
16.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
16.03.00
Electronic Structure Methods
16.04.00
Classical Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics Methods
16.05.00
Quantum Many-Body Systems and Methods
16.06.00
Fluid Dynamics and Plasma Physics
16.07.00
Novel Technologies and Algorithms

Quantum Information, Concepts, and Computation (DQI)

17.00.00
DQI Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
17.01.00
Focus Sessions
17.01.01
Superconducting Qubits (DQI, DCMP) [same as 09.01.02]This focus topic is for general talks on superconducting qubits. This focus session will highlight the technological advances in superconducting qubits, mostly in the direction of fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Talks will address improvements in a number of areas related to this technology.

Note there are other, more specific focus topics for hybrid systems (which can for example combine superconducting qubits with other quantum systems); 3D cavities (such as qubits in superconducting cavities); amplifiers and detectors (including JPAs and TWPAs); as well as several focus topics on specific aspects of superconducting qubits such as materials; circuit design; packaging; and fluxonium and other novel superconducting qubit designs. Make sure there is not a more specific focus topic that better fits the subject matter of your presentation.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.02
Semiconductor Qubits (DQI DCMP) [same as 12.01.06]This focus topic is for general talks describing advances in semiconductor-based qubits, including spins in electrostatically-defined quantum dots, in optically-controlled self-assembled quantum dots, and spins bound to impurities. This focus topic is intended to draw together talks describing progress in this general area, with interest in device fabrication, demonstrations of coherent manipulation, control and theoretical modeling.

Note there are other, more specific focus topics in related areas, including hybrid systems (which would include semiconducting qubits coupled to other quantum systems); topological quantum computing (including talks directed at e.g. Majorana systems); spin qubit measurement; spin qubit arrays; quantum computing with donor spins; and novel spin qubit systems, as well as focus topics on noise reduction; quantum control; and error correction. Make sure that there is no focus topic that is perhaps better oriented to the topic of your presentation.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.03
Trapped Ion and Cold Atom Qubits (DQI, DAMOP) [same as 06.01.07]Trapped ions and cold atoms are promising systems for practical quantum computing and quantum simulation. Quantum-information related implementations of trapped ion and cold atom systems, including degenerate gases, Rydberg atoms, and ultracold molecules, have generated a boom in the development of fundamental quantum science over the last few decades. This focus topic is for any talks related to these systems and their exploration in quantum information.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.04
Topological Quantum Computing (DQI)Topological systems provide a very promising approach for achieving fault-tolerant quantum computing platforms. This includes methods using topological codes such as the surface code, circuit-based approaches, and materials-based approaches using topological phases of matter. There has been steady progress in all these areas, and this focus topic is for any presentations dealing with these and related subject matter.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.05
Hybrid Systems (DQI)Hybrid quantum systems comprise a combination of distinct components, such as superconducting qubits and semiconducting elements, or vice versa, enabling the coupling of disparate quantum degrees of freedom, such as charge, flux and spin, microwave or optical cavity photons. Hybrid systems enable combining systems with complementary strengths or enabling new methods for coupling or measurement.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.06
Superconducting Qubits: Materials, Fabrication, and Design (DMP, DCMP, DQI) [same as
17.01.07
Superconducting Qubits: Circuit Theory, Hamiltonian Analysis and Design Tools (DQI)This focus topic is for presentations looking at understanding or improving the performance of superconducting qubit circuits via circuit theory, Hamiltonian analysis, and design tools, all with an eye towards fault-tolerant quantum information processing.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.08
Superconducting and Semiconductor Qubits: I/O, packaging, and 3D integration (DQI)All qubits operated at milli-Kelvin temperatures have common system requirements, including the delivery of many complex parallel microwave and low-frequency signals to the quantum circuits, integration of qubit dies with cryogenic packaging, control of the electromagnetic environment at cryogenic temperatures, qubit readout, and so on. Presentations describing innovation in I/O design, wiring, 3D integration and cryogenic packaging should be submitted to this focus topic.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.09
Superconducting Qubits: Fluxonium and Novel Superconducting Qubits (DQI)Significant performance improvements may be afforded for superconducting qubits designed with circuits intended to offer an increased level of protection from noise. Whether based on symmetries or disjoint support of computational states, such protected qubits can outperform existing qubit designs. This focus topic is for presentations describing new theoretical and experimental progress on designing, modeling, fabricating, and operating superconducting qubits with intrinsic protection, ranging from high-coherence fluxonium, zero-pi circuits, to entirely new circuit proposals.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.10
Semiconductor Qubits: Spin Qubit Measurement (DQI)The measurement of spins in semiconductor architectures can be performed using a capacitively- or tunnel-coupled reservoir to the quantum dot or donor spin. This focus topic is for presentations describing advances in measurement methods for spin qubits, and the improvement of measurement fidelities for these qubits.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.11
Semiconductor Qubits: Spin Qubit Arrays (DQI, DCMP) [same as 12.01.08]Arrays of spin qubits present a significant experimental challenge. This focus session will host presentations dealing with the challenges of scaling up semiconductor spin qubits, including scalable implementations of one- and two-qubit gates, reproducible fabrication of spin qubits, automated operation, and array connectivity along with multi-qubit control issues, including crosstalk, frequency crowding, power consumption and integration density.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.12
Semiconductor Qubits: Quantum Computing with Donor Spins (DQI)Donor atoms in silicon form an attractive platform for universal quantum computing due to the very long nuclear spin coherence times combined with very high fidelity (>99.9 percent) gate control. This focus topic is for presentations describing the engineering and control of donors in silicon, including control of tunneling, modeling, and the realization of high-fidelity single and two qubit gates. Advances in the fabrication, benchmarking, tunnel junctions, single-electron transistors, cavity coupling and electron spin transport are also good topics for presentations.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.13
Semiconductor Qubits: Novel spin qubit materials and technologies (DQI)There are a number of different candidate materials and technologies for pursuing the implementation of spin qubits in semiconductor solid state hosts. These include quantum dots in germanium, acceptor dopants, rare-earth ions, color centers in diamond and in silicon carbide (SiC). This focus topic encompasses presentations describing emerging semiconductor material platforms and new technologies for semiconductor spin qubits.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.14
Hybrid/Macroscopic Quantum Systems, Optomechanics, and AMO Systems (DAMOP, DQI) [same as 06.01.03]
17.01.15
3D and Multi-Mode Cavity QED SystemsThis focus topic is for presentations describing alternative architectures for superconducting quantum information and simulation, involving three-dimensional microwave cavities or exploiting multiple harmonic modes of a multi-mode microwave cavity. Multimode cavity-superconducting qubit cavity QED systems can leverage the long coherence times and restricted decoherence channels of superconducting microwave cavities, support error-protected subspaces, nonlinear coupling for multi-qubit operations, and additional mechanisms for quantum state readout and control. Presentations include descriptions of advances in cavity coupling, system designs, characterization, and control and readout methods.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.16
Noisy Intermediate Scale Quantum Computers (DQI, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.23]There are multiple parallel efforts to create hardware that supports of order one hundred noisy, fault-prone qubits, technology that will be available to researchers as it becomes mature. This focus topic explores the potential applications of such quantum computers, and how they may serve as a stepping-stone toward larger scale, fault-tolerant devices.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.17
Quantum Machine Learning (DQI, GDS) [same as 23.01.15, 17.01.17]There has been much recent interest in applying quantum technologies to machine learning. As noise levels remain high in near-term intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) devices, with limited scalability, there is a question whether quantum technologies can provide a useful advantage to the machine learning community. Much effort has been devoted to the application of optimization or sampling by quantum annealing, and in addition proposals for learning algorithms using gate-based quantum computers, continuous-variable and open quantum systems. The latest results show distinct advantages in specific scenarios, but more work is needed to develop algorithms for near-term quantum devices. This focus topic will have presentations on the most interesting recent results as well as discussing open issues.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.18
Quantum Characterization, Verification and Validation (DQI)This focus topic will host presentations on quantum characterization, verification, and validation (QCVV), procedures for estimating how well physical quantum systems serve as information processors. Presentations will cover characterizing the effect of control operations on a quantum system, as well as the effects of external noise; verifying control operations; validating that a quantum information processor can solve specific problems.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.19
Noise Reduction and Error Mitigation in Quantum Computing (DQI)As quantum information processors scale up, noise and errors remain a major challenge. Many of the standard characterization tools become impractical beyond two or three qubits, so progress towards useful quantum devices demands new approaches to modeling, measuring, and mitigating known error processes as well as emergent ones. This focus topic will have presentations discussing advances in understanding the diverse spectrum of physical errors, modeling their impact, and mitigating their effects in near-term, noisy, intermediate-scale quantum devices.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.20
Quantum Control (DQI)This focus topic brings together theorists and experimentalists working in different areas of quantum control, with presentations covering recent progress and outstanding challenges in this area, and identifying directions where quantum control can further advance quantum information.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.21
Amplifiers and Detectors: Quantum-Limited and Near Quantum-Limited (DQI)Measurements of quantum systems are key to both processing quantum information and controlling quantum systems. Measuring the state of qubits with increasing speed and fidelity is a key to their development and use, ideally while retaining a non-demolition measurement process. This focus topic if for presentations describing the experimental and theoretical progress made in measurements of qubits, focusing on systems of quantum dot qubits, superconducting qubits, and other hybrid systems.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.22
Quantum Software and Compilers (DQI)This focus topic brings together researchers working on all aspects of the quantum software stack: Quantum programming languages, compilers and optimizers, software for characterizing errors and finding error correction codes, classical simulation of quantum computation, and libraries for quantum algorithms and applications. Topics include identifying gaps in existing software stacks and possible inter-operability. Of particular interest is identifying ways that better software can accelerate the pace towards practical quantum computation by offering greater efficiency or better use of noisy intermediate-scale quantum computers.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.23
Quantum Error Correction Experiment and Theory (DQI)This focus topic is for presentations describing advances in quantum error correction and novel theoretical means for understanding and implementing quantum error correcting codes. Topics will vary from topological codes to bosonic codes and from fault-tolerant stabilizer measurements to symmetry protected subspaces.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.24
Continuous Variable Quantum Computing and Simulation (DQI)Continuous-variable quantum information carriers provide an extremely powerful alternative approach to qubits for quantum information processing. This focus session is for presentations on the most recent advances in continuous-variable quantum information systems, including quantized modes of bosonic systems such as electromagnetic fields, vibrational modes of solids, atomic ensembles, and so on.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.25
Quantum Computing Architectures (DQI)Quantum hardware underlies how quantum computers will scale into the fault-tolerant, error-corrected regime, and quantum architecture combines algorithm design and optimization, error-correction and fault-tolerance with details of device physics, fabrication and control. This focus topic presents advances in quantum computing architectures in effective and scalable system designs.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.26
Quantum Computing Algorithms (DQI)The field of quantum algorithms apply to topics as varied as cryptography, communication, search, and optimization and simulation of quantum systems. This focus topic will highlight recent developments and applications of quantum algorithms with an emphasis on new ideas and emerging themes.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.27
Quantum Annealing and Optimization (DQI)Adiabatic quantum computing and quantum annealing are computational methods that are being explored for solving combinatorial optimization and sampling problems, and have recently been successfully extended to include quantum simulation. This focus topic will have presentations describing efforts to build and implement processors that implement these strategies, describing the latest results in this exciting and rapidly developing field.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.28
Thermodynamics in quantum information (DQI, GSNP, DCMP) [same as 03.01.09, 15.01.01]The notion of a quantum heat engine has been at the forefront of research in quantum thermodynamics; however, only recently have experimentalists begun to realize genuine quantum engines. Understanding the laws governing energy, entropy and information flows between quantum systems is of crucial importance. Practical motivations are to keep a fair account of the resources to process information in the quantum realm, and optimize them with respect to well-defined performances. The question of the physical resources potentially consumed by quantum computing (whether deterministic or reservoir-assisted) has been largely overlooked, while though these may become a bottleneck for scalability. This focus topic aims to open an interdisciplinary dialog and stimulate new research addressing these questions.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.29
Distributed Quantum Computation, Networking and Information Security (DQI)This focus topic provides a venue to discuss advancements and challenges in the realization and application of networked and distributed quantum technologies, for computation, communication and sensing. This includes all aspects involved in networked quantum computing and communication systems, ranging from theoretical designs and experimental implementations, all the way to the development of quantum algorithms and protocols for quantum networks.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.30
Quantum Metrology and Sensing (DQI)This focus topic deals with the exciting developments in measurements of quantum systems and quantum sensing. Quantum-limited measurements are now being made on larger and larger systems, as well as on spin-squeezed magnetometry, adaptive phase measurements in qubits and explorations of quantum-enhanced dark matter searches. Measurements of solid state defects are pushing the limits of resolution to the scale of single atoms. This topic provides a forum for the most recent theoretical and experimental advances related to quantum measurement, metrology and sensing.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.31
Quantum Foundations (DQI)The field of quantum information has sometimes been called "applied quantum foundations." Work in the foundations of quantum mechanics thus finds its natural home in the Division of Quantum Information. Quantum foundations research includes all fundamental aspects of quantum entanglement, Bell inequalities, complementarity, quantum measurement theory, conundrums such as Wigner’s friend, delayed choice experiments, etc. Presentations will described advances in these and other areas dealing with the foundations of quantum mechanics.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.32
Teaching quantum information at all levels (FEd, DQI) [same as 27.01.01]In this focus topic, we will bring together presentations that exchange creative ideas about quantum information science education. These could include how particular QIS topics are being taught, descriptions of QIS courses or resources that are appropriate for a range of levels (e.g., high school, undergraduate, or graduate), lab education in QIS, QIS degree programs, and informal science education and outreach. Please share what you are doing to help our community excite and educate the next generation of quantum scientists and engineers. This is a general interest session, so March Meeting attendees can contribute a talk to this focus session in addition to their technical/scientific contributed talk.

Andrew Cleland

17.01.33
Materials for Quantum Information Science (DMP, DQI, DCMP) [same as 13.01.04]Technologies for the processing of information are at a cross-roads. To date, advances in information processing have been mainly achieved by miniaturization and integration, such as scaling down transistor-based semiconductor technologies and heterogeneous integration in an architecture. This traditional methodology is rapidly approaching its physical limits. A new class of information processing that explores possibilities beyond classical computing architectures is now underway, with particular emphasis on quantum phenomena that complement existing computing architectures. Quantum information processing, which may revolutionize ways to generate, transmit, and compute information, must be physically implemented by the appropriate materials. To that end, new materials and physical properties are needed, along with close collaborations between physicists, materials scientists, and electrical engineers. This focus topic hosts presentations for quantum information processing (QIP) from the materials discovery, device physics, and nanoscale structure communities, with the common theme of understanding the underlying physical interactions. Given the exploratory nature of this field, contributions are solicited broadly among the following topics:
- Superconducting materials and devices
- Trapped ion systems
- Solid-state artificial atoms (quantum dots, quantum wells)
- Solid-state quantum defects (point-defects in wide-gap semiconductors, rare-earth ions)
- 2D materials and defects in 2D materials
- Topological materials
- Hybrid quantum systems
- Magnetic systems including molecular magnets and molecular spin qubits
- Optical quantum computing devices
- Biological, polymer, or inorganic materials for QIP
- First principles theory/simulations of QIP materials.
Other ideas that may be exploratory and less well-defined at this time are also encouraged; however, suitable talks for this focus topic should relate to the materials and physics germane to QIP.

Andrew Cleland

17.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
17.03.00
Superconducting quantum information
17.04.00
Semiconducting quantum information
17.05.00
AMO quantum information
17.06.00
Topological quantum information
17.07.00
Quantum computing algorithms
17.08.00
General quantum information and quantum computation
17.09.00
Quantum foundations

Matter at Extreme Conditions (GCSM)

18.01.00
Focus Sessions
18.01.01
Matter at Extreme Conditions (GSCCM, DCOMP, DMP) [same as 16.01.01]The behavior of matter under extreme conditions of high pressure, temperature, stress and strain rates, extreme electromagnetic fields and particle irradiation, is of fundamental scientific importance for understanding a variety of phenomena including geophysical processes in the core of the Earth, processes inside of planets, super-Earths and stars, inertial confinement fusion, radiation damage, materials response to extreme static and dynamic compressions, detonation of explosives, high pressure and high temperature synthesis of novel materials. The advent of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) and continued advancement of the next generation synchrotron sources combined with a significant growth in static and dynamic compression capabilities in the US (HPCAT, NIF, Omega, DCS, MEC/LCLS) and worldwide (European XFEL, SACLA, ESRF) push the frontiers of our knowledge of the matter in the extremes. Recent advances in theory and modeling opens up exciting opportunities for stronger synergy between experiment and theory/simulations. This focus topic, consisting of several invited and contributed talks, will assess recent experimental and computational efforts towards exploring the fundamental properties of materials at extreme conditions, including:

(1) high pressure and temperature synthesis and characterization of novel energetic, superhard, quantum, earth and planetary materials;

(2) materials response to static high pressure and dynamic compressions of materials: plasticity, phase transitions, and chemical reactions;

(3) static and dynamic properties of energetic materials, including structural stability at high P-T conditions, P-T phase diagrams, and detonation phenomena;

(4) properties of matter in the warm dense regime;

(5) new computational methods at atomistic, microstructural and continuum levels, multi-scale simulations, techniques for reaching longer timescales, and novel applications of data science and exascale computations to simulate matter at extreme conditions;

(6) new experimental developments including emergent new static and dynamic compression and characterization capabilities at National User Facilities (synchrotron, neutron and XFEL characterization and novel laser and pulsed power drives at DCS/APS, NIF, Omega, MEC/LCLS, Z machine);

(7) emergent novel phenomena including high-temperature superconductivity at high pressure, and biophysics at extreme conditions including deep life.

Ivan Oleynik

18.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
18.03.00
Theory and Simulation of Materials at Extreme Conditions
18.04.00
Static High-Pressure Experiments
18.05.00
Dynamic High-Pressure Experiments
18.06.00
Other Extreme Conditions

Instrumentation and Measurements (GIMS)

19.00.00
GIMS Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
19.01.00
Focus Sessions
19.01.01
Advances in scanned probe microscopy (will make subcategories based on abstracts received)
19.01.02
Machine learning approaches for instrumentation and measurement science
19.01.03
Tools for studying materials under extreme conditions
19.01.04
Diffraction limited storage rings: sources, optics, and instrumentation
19.01.05
Ultrafast microscopy methods
19.01.06
Tools and Techniques for Exploring Materials Physics at the Frontier of Time and Length Scales (DMP, GIMS)The exploration of materials properties and the discovery of new materials is intimately connected with advances in tools that allow to synthesize, characterize, and model materials at fundamental length, time, and energy scales. Those scales have reached the level of atomic control, i.e. the constituents of any materials on the nanoscale, but recently, approaches to explore materials with atomic precision across multiple length, time and energy scales have gained increased interest. This includes the synthesis of multidimensional artificial materials that don’t exist in nature, materials far from equilibrium that only exist for ultrashort time scales and novel ways to characterize properties of quantum and nanosystems using unprecedented techniques. Computational efforts using high-performance tools are starting to provide essential support in this endeavor. State-of-the-art techniques using neutrons, fully coherent wave fronts at diffraction limits with electrons and photons, and novel advances with scanning probes are currently being developed and utilized by a growing community working in materials physics. This focus topic on recent advances in this important field that will provide a coherent view onto current capabilities and future perspective that are of interest to the broad materials physics community.

Vivien Zapf

19.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
19.03.00
Detectors, Sensors, and Transducers
19.04.00
Spectroscopic Techniques
19.05.00
Scattering and Diffraction
19.06.00
Microscopy (other than scanned probe)
19.07.00
Signal Processing and Analysis
19.08.00
Thermal and IR Instrumentation
19.09.00
Acoustic and Ultrasonic Instrumentation
19.10.00
Neutron, IR, and X-ray Optics and Sources
19.11.00
Measurement technology for renewable and fossil energy applications
19.12.00
Other Instrumentation and Measurement Science
19.13.00
Methods for studying solid-liquid interfaces

Fluids (DFD)

20.00.00
DFD Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
20.01.00
Focus Sessions
20.01.01
Granular, Porous Media, and Multiphase Flows (DFD, GSNP) [same as 03.01.30]
20.01.02
Fluid Structure Interactions (FSI)
20.01.03
Swimming, Motility, and Locomotion (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.69]
20.01.05
Swimming, Motility, and Locomotion (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.55]
20.01.06
Flow of Complex Fluids: Rheology, Structure and Instabilities (DFD, DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.51, 01.01.37]
20.01.07
Drops (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.52]
20.01.08
Active Colloids (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.53]
20.01.09
Thin Films, Surface Flows and Interfaces (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.54]
20.01.10
3D Printing of Polymers and Soft Materials: From Chemistry and Processing to Devices and Characterization (DFD, FIAP) [same as, 22.01.11]
20.01.11
Polymer and Polyelectrolyte Rheology (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DFD) [same as 01.01.11, 02.01.25, 03.01.28]
20.01.12
Polymers and Soft Solids at Interfaces: Tribology, Wear, Rheology and Interactions (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DFD, DMP) [same as 01.01.16, 02.01.39, 03.01.36]
20.01.13
Active matter in complex environments (DSOFT, DBIO, GSNP, DFD) [same as 02.01.09, 04.01.01, 03.01.17]
20.01.14
Mechanics of cells and tissue (DBIO, DFD ) [same as 04.01.02 ]
20.01.15
Electrostatic Manipulation of Fluids and Soft Matter (DFD)
20.01.16
Microflows Meet Soft Matter: Compliance, Growth, Instabilities and Beyond (DFD)
20.01.17
Steerable particles: new ways to manipulate fluid-mediated forces (GSNP, DFD, DSOFT) [same as 03.01.11, 02.01.23]
20.01.18
Physics of Liquids (DFD)
20.01.19
Rheology of Gels (DFD)
20.01.20
Black Science Matters: Highlighting Black Scientists in Soft Matter (DFD)
20.01.21
Soft matter physics in a geophysical context (DFD)
20.01.22
Physics of Biofilms (DBIO, DFD, DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.48, 01.01.52, 02.01.41]
20.01.23
Granular Flows Beyond Simple Mechanical Models (GSNP, DSOFT, DFD) [same as 03.01.04, 02.01.22]
20.01.24
Transport phenomena in heterogeneous and dynamic environments: from colloids to active matter (DFD, DBIO, DSOFT, GSNP) [same as 04.01.54, 02.01.43, 03.01.31]
20.01.25
Wind Turbine Wake Mitigation Techniques
20.01.26
Extreme-Scale Computational Science Discovery in Fluid Dynamics and Related Disciplines (DCOMP, DFD)[same as 16.01.13]
20.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
20.03.00
Flow of Complex Fluids, Polymers, Gels
20.04.00
Pattern Formation and Nonlinear Dynamics
20.05.00
Instabilities and Turbulence
20.06.00
Simulating Fluid Flow: CFD, Machine Learning, and Data Driven Methods
20.07.00
Drops, Bubbles and Interfacial Fluid Mechanics
20.08.00
Swimming, Motility and Locomotion
20.09.00
Geophysical and Climate Dynamics
20.10.00
Granular & Particle Suspension Flows
20.11.00
Multiphase Flows
20.12.00
Fluid Dynamics – Other

Energy Research and Applications (GERA)

21.00.00
GERA Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
21.01.00
Focus Sessions
21.01.01
Advances in Thermal Energy Conversion for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 22.01.05]
21.01.02
Computational Modeling of Materials for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 22.01.06]
21.01.03
Recent Advances in Solar Photovoltaics and Energy Conversion: Materials and Devices (GERA, FIAP) [same as 22.01.07]
21.01.04
Advances in Wide Bandgap Materials and Devices for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 22.01.08]
21.01.05
Advances in Energy Storage Materials and Devices for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 22.01.09]
21.01.06
Advances in Magnetic and Dielectric Materials for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 22.01.10]
21.01.07
Dynamics of polymers and electrolytes in bulk and in confinement (GERA)
21.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
21.03.00
Alternative Energy
21.04.00
Energy Storage
21.05.00
Biofuels, Solar Fuels and Artificial Photosynthetic Systems
21.06.00
Energy Conservation and Efficiency
21.07.00
Electricity Production and Conversion
21.08.00
Energy for Transportation
21.09.00
Hydrogen Production, Storage and Delivery
21.10.00
Solid State Lighting

Applications (IT, Medical/Bio, Photonics, etc.) (FIAP)

22.00.00
FIAP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
22.01.00
Focus Sessions
22.01.01
Emerging, neuromorphic, and computing beyond Moore's Law
22.01.02
Telecommunications physics
22.01.03
Soft Matters in Industrial Applications (FIAP)
22.01.04
Spin transport and Magnetization Dynamics in Metals-Based Systems (GMAG, DMP, FIAP) [same as 10.01.03]
22.01.05
Advances in Thermal Energy Conversion for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 21.01.01]
22.01.06
Computational Modeling of Materials for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 21.01.02]
22.01.07
Recent Advances in Solar Photovoltaics and Energy Conversion: Materials and Devices (GERA, FIAP) [same as 21.01.03]
22.01.08
Advances in Wide Bandgap Materials and Devices for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 21.01.04]
22.01.09
Advances in Energy Storage Materials and Devices for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 21.01.05]
22.01.10
Advances in Magnetic and Dielectric Materials for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 21.01.06]
22.01.11
3D Printing of Polymers and Soft Materials: From Chemistry and Processing to Devices and Characterization ( DFD, FIAP) [same as 20.01.10]
22.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
22.03.00
Optical/Laser and High Frequency Devices and Applications Including Optoelectronics and Photonics
22.04.00
Applications of Semiconductors, Dielectrics, Complex Oxides (non-magnetic)
22.05.00
Industrial superconducting technology
22.06.00
Applications of Thermoelectrics
22.07.00
Magnetic Devices and Applications (FIAP, GMAG) [same as 10.12.00]
22.08.00
Bionanotechnology and Applications of Polymers and Biomaterials
22.09.00
Nanotechnology (non-bio)
22.10.00
Next-generation manufacturing
22.11.00
Industrial computing, machine learning, and modeling

Data Science (GDS)

23.00.00
GDS Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
23.01.00
Focus Sessions
23.01.01
Big Data in Physics (GDS)The scientific method is founded on data analysis to validate physical theories. The analysis of data in the physical sciences is now ubiquitous and the rise of big data represents an opportunity for physicists. Big data analytics methods can achieve a high accuracy similar to real-world modeling while simpler and cheaper than a conventional computer simulation. This focus session welcomes contributions to all aspects of this convergence of Big Data and Physics.

Marilena Longobardi

23.01.02
Deep Learning for Spectroscopy (GDS)Spectroscopic techniques are essential tools for studying chemical compositions, crystal structures, and electromagnetic properties of hard and soft condensed matter from atomic to mesoscale. Recent advances in machine learning have led to new opportunities for improving the spectral data quality and for analyzing the measurement result. This focus session will cover all types of photon, electron, atomic, and molecular spectroscopic studies augmented by machine learning and deep neural networks.

Marilena Longobardi

23.01.03
AI Materials Design and Discovery (GDS)AI and machine learning have created a new paradigm for materials design and discovery in fundamental and applied research. This emerging data-driven framework is also revolutionizing the deployment of novel quantum and functional materials with an unprecedented speed. This focus session will highlight contributions to advancing the field of materials informatics. The topics of interests will include but not limited to (i) creating materials database with ab initio calculations or experiments, (ii) applying AI techniques for predictive materials modeling, (iii) developing new materials-related AI algorithms and innovative feature descriptors, and (iv) enhancing the insights for interpretability and physical understanding of AI models.

Marilena Longobardi

23.01.04
Open Science/Open Data (GDS)Science relies on the sharing of ideas, results, methods and data. As modern research is more complex and more data-driven, progress in scientific knowledge becomes intimately tighten to research data availability. Open Science can be used to support several disciplines and applications, including science, finance, statistics, weather and society. Open data, including simulations, source codes, laboratory measurements and data generated by the social sciences, can increase the transparencies in science and foster cross-disciplinary collaborations. Moreover, open access to the research results would enable faster and broader diffusion of scientific knowledge. This session will focus on the great potential and the challenges of Open Data and Open Science. We will discuss the state of the art, the perspectives for the next future, and some case studies.

Marilena Longobardi

23.01.05
AI & Real World Networks (GDS)This focus session is for research that advance scientific understanding of real-world systems using large datasets and data science methods. Recent events especially in the COVD era have highlighted the importance of fundamental scientific advances in analyzing and understanding patterns through increasingly available data. Contributions will be accepted across wide topics such as social networks, epidemiological networks, transportation networks, and brain networks (not an exclusive list).

Marilena Longobardi

23.01.06
Autonomous Systems and Control (GDS)Advances in machine learning, automated experimental control, miniaturization of diagnostics, and networked computing power over the past two decades have led to popularization of artificial intelligence approaches to autonomous experimentation for optimization and discovery in physics. Online collection of data in a machine-friendly format (e.g. database or dataframe) has allowed for instant analysis with data science techniques, greatly accelerating the overall experimental process. Coupled with active learning models, sequential experiments may even be designed and proceed without human intervention. This methodology has been successful for both physical experimentation as well as in the context of theoretical modeling such as molecular dynamics simulations. This focus session explores the experimental and computational techniques that make autonomous experimentation a success.

Marilena Longobardi

23.01.07
AI and Statistical/Thermal Physics (GDS)Statistical Physics has been part of numerous recent breakthroughs in AI. Methods from statistical physics are proving valuable for enhancing AI algorithms, or making AI algorithms more explainable. At the same time AI algorithms are contributing solutions to a growing list of complex problems in statistical/thermal physics. This session welcomes contributions to all aspects of this convergence of Artificial Intelligence and Statistical/Thermal Physics.

Marilena Longobardi

23.01.08
Visualization Techniques and Systems (GDS)Visualization techniques and systems are playing an increasing role in physics as datasets continue to expand and data analysis challenges become more sophisticated. Visualization is integral to modern data science. Visualization offers unique opportunities for human-in-the-loop analysis including interactive, real-time exploratory analysis of millions of data points, augmented reality, and techniques for exploring the inner works of machine learning models (i.e., explainable AI). Visualization is also integral to how we communicate and disseminate physical insights. By bringing together those working on visualization systems and techniques for physics applications, this session will be a forum for advancing data science in physics that is complementary to on-going initiatives and sessions focused on automated data analysis.

Marilena Longobardi

23.01.09
Machine Learning for Quantum Matter (DCOMP, GDS, DMP) [same as 16.01.05]
23.01.10
Machine Learning and Data in Polymer Physics (DPOLY, DBIO, DCOMP, GDS, FIAP) [same as 01.01.01, 04.01.19, 16.01.17, 08.01.05]
23.01.11
Emerging Trends in Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Machine Learning (DCOMP, GDS, DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 16.01.11, 02.01.57, 01.01.41]
23.01.12
Deep Learning for Computer Vision (GDS)The success of deep learning approaches in the analysis of images and movies is starting to impact a wide range of research areas in physics. The goal of this focus session is to share best practices in deep learning for computer vision as applied across the physics research areas represented at the APS March Meeting, in particular, biophysics, soft matter physics, medical physics, and statistical and nonlinear physics. Both new approaches to deep learning and adaptation and implementation of existing deep learning tools are of interest to this focus session.

Marilena Longobardi

23.01.13
Machine learning for biomolecular design and simulation (DPOLY, GDS, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP) [same as 01.01.30, 02.01.43, 04.01.38, 16.01.22]
23.01.14
Artificial intelligence and machine learning in medicine and biomedicine (GMED, GDS) [same as 25.01.01]
23.01.15
Quantum machine learning (DQI, GDS) [same as 17.01.17]There has been much recent interest in applying quantum technologies to machine learning. As noise levels remain high in near-term intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) devices, with limited scalability, there is a question whether quantum technologies can provide a useful advantage to the machine learning community. Much effort has been devoted to the application of optimization or sampling by quantum annealing, and in addition proposals for learning algorithms using gate-based quantum computers, continuous-variable and open quantum systems. The latest results show distinct advantages in specific scenarios, but more work is needed to develop algorithms for near-term quantum devices. This focus topic will have presentations on the most interesting recent results as well as discussing open issues.

Marilena Longobardi

23.01.16
Statistical Physics Meets Machine Learning (GSNP, GDS, DCMP, DCOMP, DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 16.01.16, 03.01.06, 02.01.28, 04.01.55]
23.01.17
Differentiable and Machine Learning Infused Simulations in Fluid Dynamics (GDS, DFD)With the accelerating advances in machine learning, fluid dynamicists have begun to more and more rely on machine learning techniques to enhance or analyse simulations and the data they produce. While this has produced a great many new advances, it is yet a non-intrusive paradigm in which the simulations are run and the machine learning then takes place outside of the code itself, leaving information contained in the simulations, as well as domain knowledge untapped. In recent years, building on prior work on the automatic differentiation of scientific codes, a new paradigm has emerged in which machine learning is directly integrated into the simulation in approaches which some call differentiable programming, and some call machine-learning accelerated simulations. This focus session will bring together fluid dynamics domain scientists with machine learning researcher to jointly explore the frontier of this burgeoning domain and the great many different angles taken to it. This includes (1) advances in machine-learning infused scientific computing, (2) advances in automatic differentiation enabled inclusion of fluid dynamics simulation trajectory gradients in machine learning workflows, and (3) the replacement or complementing of traditional simulation components with machine learning techniques such as physics-informed neural network surrogates and graph neural networks.

Marilena Longobardi

23.01.18
Data science for industry (GDS, FIAP)Data science in the industry will complement physical and engineering-based models through access to vast data combined with increased processing power and new modelling techniques. This will enable to derive models from patterns and signals, automate a whole range of processes, simulate the impact of operational scenarios, and predict future states and events. It will surely contribute significantly to making industry more efficient, much safer and reduce its environmental impact. This focus session will welcome contributions to all aspects of this convergence of Data Science and industry.

Marilena Longobardi

23.01.19
AI for Quantum Physics (GDS, FECS)Exploring different uses of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has always been a successful mission and among its numerous uses, quantum mechanics stands in a vital position. For example, AI can be used to predict molecular wave functions and the electronic properties of molecules. The behavior of the electron in the molecule can be observed and the data can be fed to AI algorithm, which would further predict the future behaviors of the electrons in the molecules. This focus session will welcome contributions to all aspects of this convergence of Artificial Intelligence and Quantum Physics.

Marilena Longobardi

23.01.20
Data science for climate (GDS, GPC)
23.01.21
Machine learning for material science (GDS, DMP)One of the most exciting tools that have entered material science in recent years is machine learning (ML). This tool has already proved to be capable of speeding up both fundamental and applied research. For example, ML tools enable scientists to connect and iterate through different materials design and optimization steps, including hypothesis generation, prediction, synthesis, characterization, and testing. Moreover, ML impacts several aspects of material science, from the calculation of material properties to the development of machine learning force fields for simulations in material science to the construction of DFT functionals, to provide just some examples. This focus session will welcome contributions to all aspects of this convergence of Machine Learning and Material Science.

Marilena Longobardi

23.01.22
Data science, ML and active matter (GDS, DBIO) [same as 04.01.56]
23.01.23
Integrative-omics from Bioinformatics to Medical Informatics (DBIO, GDS) same as 04.01.49)
23.01.24
Data Science for Biophysics: applications, theory and computation (DBIO, GDS, GSNP, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.22, 03.01.35, 04.01.47]
23.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
23.03.00
Data Science in Physics
23.04.00
Machine Learning
23.05.00
AI and Deep Learning

Laser Science (DLS)

24.00.00
DLS Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
24.01.00
Focus Sessions
24.01.01
Ultrafast Dynamics and Control of Quantum Materials (DLS)
24.01.02
Ultrafast spectroscopy and coherent phenomena in the x-ray domain (DCP, DCMP, DLS) [same as 05.01.02]
24.01.03
Coherent Nonlinear Optical Microscopy
24.02.00
STANDARD CATEGORIES
24.03.00
Laser Science
24.04.00
Ultrafast Spectroscopy
24.05.00
Quantum Materials
24.06.00
Non-equilibrium Dynamics

Medical Physics (GMED)

25.00.00
GMED Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
25.01.00
Focus Sessions
25.01.01
Artificial intelligence and machine learning in medicine and biomedicine (GMED, GDS) [same as 23.01.15]Research in medicine and biomedicine generates large datasets, including anatomic and pathologic imaging, genetic assays, demographic information, and clinical data. We are in the midst of a technological revolution with tremendous advances in imaging technology, -omics science, and wide adoption of wearable and IoT devices. Health information has become multi-modal, with high temporal and spatial resolution complementing increasingly granular clinical information.

Manual parsing of these data limits their utility, and there now exist tremendous opportunities for both automated processing and deeper analysis of datasets. Artificial intelligence can improve the utility of big medical datasets by accelerating analysis for real-time decision making, guiding treatment regimens, elucidating indicators of disease state, and helping determine likelihood of response. In this focus session, we seek submissions on the use of AI, machine learning, and deep learning to address management and analysis of medical and biomedical data, with an emphasis on efforts towards development of therapeutics or tools for clinical decision-making.

Matija Milanic

25.01.02
Frontiers of magnetic imaging (GMED, GMAG) [same as 10.01.11]Many exciting breakthroughs in magnetic imaging have been achieved in the last few years including FDA approved low field MRI for point of care diagnostics, hyperpolarized Xe MRI for COVID lung assessment, magnetoencephalography with optical magnetometers, combined AI/physics based image reconstruction. This session will highlight physics-enabled breakthroughs in these areas as well as solicit abstracts for new frontier research in MRI, magnetoencephalography, magnetic particle imaging, hyperpolarized imaging, microMRI, and magnetic scanned probe microscopy for pathology. In this focus session, we seek submissions on these and related topics.

Matija Milanic

25.01.03
Physics of COVID and Pandemics (GMED, DBIO) [same as 04.01.57]The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 first appeared in Wuhan, China in December 2019, and has since spread around the world, causing a global pandemic and worldwide economic hardship. Large amounts of worldwide data on testing, number of infections and deaths have been collected and made publicly available, resulting in a number of scientific investigations on the biology, epidemiology, virology, transmission, control, and treatment of the virus and its associated disease. Physicists have been actively working on a wide variety of aspects of the COVID pandemic such as epidemiological modeling and predictions, effects of temperature and humidity on transmission rates, dynamics of infection under social distancing, COVID outcomes in cancer patients, analysis of SARS-CoV-2 RNA sequences using machine learning, the role of recombination and convergent evolution in the emergence of the virus, utilization of cell phone data to model the spread of COVID-19, etc. For this focus session we seek submissions that apply physics techniques to study various aspects of COVID-19 and pandemics in general.

Matija Milanic

25.01.04
Optics across biological and medical physics (DBIO, GMED)[same as 04.01.39]Progress of optics in biological and medical physics is driven by development of new light sources, optical detectors, measurement techniques and analysis algorithms, resulting in more sensitive, faster, smaller or less expensive optical systems for studying biological systems over multiple scales – from biomolecules to whole organisms.
The main goal of this session is to join the effort of biophysics, focused on understanding how biological systems work, and medical physics, focusing on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human diseases, in the field of optics. Specifically, the session objectives are to provide a review of recent developments of optical techniques, to report novel approaches, and to bring together the biophysicists and medical physicists advancing the field of optics in life sciences and medicine.
The session topics include, for example:
o optical spectroscopy (Raman, VIS-NIR, fluorescence spectroscopy),
o optical imaging (OCT, photoacoustic tomography, spectral imaging),
o optical microscopy (confocal, multiphoton, FLIM, super-resolution microscopy)
o optical manipulation (tweezers)
o optical therapy (laser therapies, photodynamic therapy, photobiomodulation)

Matija Milanic

25.01.05
Flow of Soft Granular Matter (DPOLY, GMED, GSNP) [same as 02.01.19, 03.01.14]
25.02.00
STANDARD CATEGORIES
25.03.00
Physics of medical therapies (e.g., radiation, photonic, and ultrasonic therapy, therapy guidance)
25.04.00
Physics of medical diagnostics (e.g., EEG, ECG, oximetry, blood pressure measurements)
25.05.00
Physics of medical imaging (e.g., CT, MRI, PET, SPECT, US, optical)
25.06.00
Physics of medical technologies (e.g., surgical hardware, decision systems, medical accelerators)
25.07.00
Physics of disease states and normal physiology (e.g., cancer, neuro-degenerative, immune system, vascular system)
25.08.00
Medical data analysis
25.09.00
General medical physics

Climate Physics (GPC)

26.00.00
GPC Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
26.01.00
Focus Sessions
26.01.01
Rare events, tipping points, and abrupt changes in the climate system (GPC)We are witnessing changes on a global scale without precedent in human history such as the record-breaking temperatures observed in the Pacific Northwest of the United States and Canada in early July 2021. The APS plans to issue a consensus statement on Earth’s Changing Climate (including citations to the literature not shown here) that begins
“Earth’s climate is changing. This critical issue poses the risk of significant environmental, social, and economic disruptions around the globe. Multiple lines of evidence strongly support the finding that anthropogenic greenhouse gases have become the dominant driver of global climate warming observed since the mid-twentieth century. Moreover, the deduction that human-induced alterations to many principal components of the climate system are accelerating is supported by the preponderance of observational evidence.”
The evidentiary basis for these statements has been drawn from reports prepared by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC – see https://www.ipcc.ch/) whose next major assessment will be finalized in 2021 and incorporates a set of special reports (cited in the APS Proposed Statement). The Earth system has strong internal variability on many timescales. Large-scale transitions can occur due to tipping points in components of the climate system and, in many cases, these depend on complex interactions between different sub-systems.

Furthermore, we seek contributed talks in this session that connect fluctuations and responses within the climate system, spanning broad aspects of this highly impactful arena. The session will remain consistent with the primary objective of the GPC, that is to promote the advancement and diffusion of knowledge concerning the physics, measurement, and modeling of climate processes, within the domain of the natural sciences but outside the domains of societal impact, policy legislation, and broader social issues. The objective includes the integration of scientific knowledge and analysis methods across disciplines to address the dynamical complexities and uncertainties of climate physics.

William Newman

26.01.02
Statistical and nonlinear physics of Earth and its climateObservations of natural processes on Earth, including those driven by its changing climate, present challenging applied problems that have potential to advance research in statistical and nonlinear physics. These phenomena are not observed in a pristine laboratory setting, and come not only with environmental heterogeneities, but also with enormous uncertainties about the underlying physical models. This session is aimed at bringing together researchers investigating Earth, its landscape and ecosystems, and its climate, all through a lens of statistical and nonlinear physics. We envision a broad set of topics, from critical phenomena associated with river networks, melt ponds on Arctic sea ice, and vegetation pattern formation in drylands, to the distribution of lakes on Earth’s surface and the fracture mechanics of ice shelves in the Antarctic. How might we use satellite and terrestrial observational data to constrain models and test predictions? What is the potential for table-top experiments to probe physical processes that usually operate on a very large scale? What is an appropriate pairing of conceptual theoretical physics models with large scale computational ones to advance understanding of Earth in a changing climate? This session will facilitate an exchange of ideas and pressing questions between physicists and Earth scientists, and explore how modern methods of statistical and nonlinear physics can have an impact on these problems, and what new physics can be learned by studying Earth's many physical processes.

Mary Silber

26.01.03
DSOFT meets climate Change (DSOFT, GPC) [same as 02.01.44]
26.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
26.03.00
Physics of Climate

Physics Education (FED)

27.00.00
FEd Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
27.01.00
Focus Sessions
27.01.01
Teaching Quantum Information at All Levels (FEd, DQI) [same as 17.01.32]
27.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
27.03.00
Pre-Service Teacher Preparation
27.04.00
International Science Education
27.05.00
K-12 Education
27.06.00
Informal Education and Public Outreach
27.07.00
Undergraduate Education (For Undergraduate Research, see 34.0)
27.08.00
Graduate Education
27.09.00
Education and Public Policy
27.10.00
Professional Development
27.11.00
Physics Education Research
27.12.00
Remote Instruction

Physics Outreach and Engaging the Public (FOEP)

28.00.00
FOEP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
28.02.00
Outreach and Engaging the Public

History of Physics (FHPP)

29.00.00
FHPP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
29.02.00
History and Philosophy of Physics

International Physics (FIP)

30.00.00
Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)

Early Career Scientists (FECS)

31.00.00
FECS Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
31.02.00
Early Career Physics
31.03.00
FECS Postdoctoral Poster CompetitionThe Forum for Early Career Scientists (FECS) is hosting a poster competition for postdocs at the 2022 March Meeting. The winner will receive a $500 prize and a certificate; runners up will receive $100 and a certificate. If you submit an abstract to this session you may still submit another abstract for an ordinary session (for a total of two abstracts).
Eligibility:
Abstracts are accepted in any topic covered by the meeting. All postdoctoral fellows within 5 years of their PhD being awarded are eligible to participate in the competition. The applicant must be the presenting author of the poster and a member of the Forum for Early Career Scientists at the APS (free to join for APS members).

For questions, please contact Adam Iaizzi (iaizzi@bu.edu).

Adam Iaizzi

Public Policy (FPS)

32.00.00
FPS Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
32.02.00
Public Policy

Graduate Student Affairs (FGSA)

33.00.00
FGSA Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
33.02.00
Graduate Student Affairs

Undergraduate Research (APS/SPS)

34.02.00
Undergraduate Research/Society of Physics Students

Committee on Minorities (COM)

35.00.00
COM Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
35.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories

Status of Women in Physics (CSWP)

36.00.00
CSWP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
36.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories

General Physics (GEN PHY)

37.02.00
General Physics