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Kavli Symposium Speakers (Invitation Only)

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Kavli Symposium Speakers (Invitation Only)

Polymer Physics (DPOLY)

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DPOLY Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
01.01.00
DPOLY Focus Sessions
01.01.01
Machine Learning and Data in Polymer Physics (DPOLY, DBIO, DCOMP, GDS, FIAP) [same as 04.01.19, 16.01.17, 23.01.11, 08.01.05]Increasingly, polymer and soft materials research is incorporating data-analytic techniques, including (but not strictly limited to) machine learning to classify materials and predict new properties or formulations, to extract data from natural language processing, and to inform the design of experimental assays. We solicit contributions from cutting edge research intertwining polymers and soft materials with machine learning and data. Of particular interest are efforts unifying data science with experimental research, work exploring vast existing datasets for the design of new materials, and techniques to mine data in different forms (e.g. simulation trajectories) and different sources (e.g. rheology or scattering) which elucidate fundamental polymer physics.

Debbie Audus (NIST), Jonathan Whitmer (Notre Dame); debra.audus@nist.gov, jwhitme1@nd.edu

01.01.02
Organic Electronics (DPOLY, FIAP, DMP) [same as 08.01.06]This session invites talks on the fundamental physics of polymer and small molecule semiconductors, as related to photonic and charge transport processes and their electronic, optical, and magnetic properties. Experimental and theoretical studies on processing-structure-function relationships in devices, including transistors, solar cells, sensors, and light emitting diodes and device physics are welcome. Contributions on the interface between conjugated organic molecules/polymers and biological systems are also encouraged.

Stephanie Lee (Stevens Instit Tech), Takuji Adachi (University of Geneva); slee23@stevens.edu, Takuji.Adachi@unige.ch

01.01.03
Electric Polarization in Polymer Physics (DPOLY, GSNP, DCP, DCOMP) [same as 03.01.32, 05.01.07, 16.01.18]Polar polymers synthesized by introducing polar groups on the monomers have been shown to be promising materials with desirable responses to various stimuli in applications such as actuators, capacitors, membranes and polymer batteries. However, the simple introduction of polar groups leads to dramatic changes in structure and dynamics of the polymers. These changes get reflected in the responses of the polymers to temperature, applied electric fields and solvents used in the processing. In this session, research related to electric polarization in polar polymers will be discussed. Local and non-local (due to gradients) effects of electric polarization, applied electric fields and ion solvation in affecting structure and dynamics of polar polymers will be discussed. Computational and experimental results obtained using scattering and reflectivity measurements, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy-based measurements will be discussed. In addition to fundamentals, applications of polar polymers for various applications will be discussed.

Rajeev Kumar (Oak Ridge), Yangyang Wang (Oak Ridge); kumarr@ornl.gov, wangy@ornl.gov

01.01.04
Polymer Nanocomposites: From Fundamentals to Applications (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP) [same as 02.01.29, 03.01.33]The addition of nanoscale fillers to polymer materials with the goal of enhancing or tuning materials properties has been utilized over the past few decades. This focus session covers recent developments on the structure-property relationship of polymer nanocomposites that exhibit mechanical, optical, electronic, magnetic, dielectric, or barrier properties. Areas of interest include polymer and nanoparticle dynamics in nanocomposites, mechanical properties (glassy behavior, fracture, creep, and viscoelastic properties), fabrication and processing of polymer nanocomposites, semi-crystalline nanocomposite materials, structural characterization, and phase behavior. We welcome experimental and computational contributions. Recent developments based on big data and machine learning on understanding and predicting the structure-property relationship of polymer nanocomposites are also of the interest.

Rob Hickey (PennState), Shiwang Cheng (Michigan State); rjh64@psu.edu, chengsh9@egr.msu.edu

01.01.05
Hierarchical Structural Emergence in Elastomer Nanocomposites: Dispersion, Dynamics, Structure, Modeling, and Simulation (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.30]Nanoparticle reinforcement has transformed friable elastomers into tear resistant, tough materials that pervade the modern world enabling automotive transport. Many materials have been explored as reinforcing filler and it is found that nanoaggregates provide the best reinforcement. The most common fillers are nano-aggregates of silica and carbon black with ~10 nm primary particles arranged in branched mass fractal aggregates of ~100 nm. Through emergent hierarchical networks these nanoparticles and their agglomerated networks impact properties centered on the micron scale such as tear resistance and large strain amplitude mechanical response, i.e. the Payne effect. This session explores the complex hierarchical structure and properties that emerge in nanocomposite elastomers through structural and dynamic analysis, simulation, and modeling.

Greg Beaucage (U Cincinnati), Julian Oberdisse (Montpellier U, France), Anne-Caroline Genix (Montpellier U); gbeaucage@gmail.com, Julian.Oberdisse@umontpellier.fr, anne-caroline.genix@umontpellier.fr

01.01.06
Advanced Morphological Characterization of Polymeric Materials (DPOLY)The scientific discoveries that expand the frontier of research require scientific instruments and techniques to enable observation of the structure at multiple length scales. Recent advances in instrumentation, including in scattering, microscopy, and spectroscopy techniques, will transform how we characterize the polymer microstructure at the atomic, molecular and mesoscopic scale, as well as how we measure polymer dynamics across broad timescales. For example, high-flux coherent light sources enable X-ray ptychography and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, thereby opening up a new frontier for structure and dynamic characterization of polymeric materials. New microscopy techniques can image polymers at a sub-nanometer resolution with selective chemical contrast and controlled dosage to minimize sample damage. Contributions to this Focus Session will highlight recent advances in structural and dynamic characterization of complex multi-functional soft materials over a broad range of length and time scales. This includes work related to the use of X-ray, photon, neutron, and electron beams to explore structure-property relationships for polymers involved in energy, biological or mechanical applications, as well as advances in modeling and analyses to complement structural characterization. Works focused on the use of resonant X-ray scattering, contrast-varied neutron scattering, and analytical transmission electron microscopy to probe the structure and dynamics of the polymer are particularly encouraged, as well as in-operando and in-situ experiments or experiments focused on multimodal characterization techniques.

Xiaodan Gu (Southern Missip.), Cheng Wang (LBNL); Xiaodan.Gu@usm.edu, cwang2@lbl.gov

01.01.07
Responsive Polymers, Soft Materials, and Hybrids (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 02.01.31, 04.01.20]Stimuli-responsive polymers and soft materials have been utilized for generating various shapes, motions, and functions by spatial and temporal changes in their physical and/or chemical properties due to external stimuli (i.e., temperature, light, pH, salt, electricity, humidity, etc). Such designable and programmable characteristics have created new opportunities in applications ranging from drug delivery, biomimetic systems, sensors, actuators, to soft robotics. This focus session covers recent advances in stimuli-responsive polymers, soft materials, and hybrids including fundamentals of materials, manufacturing techniques, characterization of the response, and their applications at various size scales. We welcome experimental and computational contributions.

Jinhye Bae (UCSD), Matthew Green (Arizona State); j3bae@ucsd.edu, mdgreen8@asu.edu

01.01.08
3D Printing of Polymers and Soft Materials: From Chemistry and Processing to Devices and Characterization (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DFD, FIAP) [same as 02.01.32, 03.01.34, 20.01.11, 22.01.11]3D printing of polymers and soft materials relies on a variety of chemical and physical processes, such as thermal extrusion, hydrogel and bio-printing, laser sintering, monomer jetting and photopolymerization. For example, fused deposition modeling (FDM) (aka fused filament fabrication (FFF)), Polyjet, selective laser sintering (SLS), direct ink writing (DIW), stereolithography (SLA), and digital light processing (DLP) techniques have provided emerging opportunities to prepare complex-shaped parts and devices using a wide range of polymers, polymer composites and soft materials via versatile and high throughput platforms of additive manufacturing. Furthermore, 3D printing of soft matter using bio-printing has become important for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This focus session will provide opportunities to invite keynote speakers in 3D printing of polymers and soft materials and to have researchers discuss their recent findings of chemistry, physics, device and characterization of 3D printed objects.

Chang Y. Ryu (RPI), Anthony Kotula (NIST), Jinhye Bae (UCSD); ryuc@rpi.edu, anthony.kotula@nist.gov, j3bae@eng.ucsd.edu

01.01.09
Polymers Under Dynamic Environmental Conditions (DPOLY, DCP) [same as 05.01.09]This session is focused on polymers under dynamic external conditions, including ionizing radiation, extreme pressures and temperatures, solvent, and electric and magnetic fields. This will include chemically reactive scenarios as well as those for which chemical bonds are not necessarily broken. Topics will focus on chain scission and cross-linking reactions, network rearrangements, and ordering/disordering phenomena due to environmental variables. All of these scenarios can induce significant changes in the mechanical properties of any given polymer structure, which can be largely unknown for many systems and sets of conditions. This session will also explore the effects of various additional environmental factors, such as changes in relative humidity and different gaseous atmospheres on these systems. We wish for presentations to span experimental and computational approaches, including novel machine learning studies. Our goal is to engage a wide variety of research efforts in a synergistic discussion in areas of mutual interest.

Nir Goldman (LLNL), Christian Pester (PennState); goldman14@llnl.gov, cup280@psu.edu

01.01.10
Non-equilibrium and Process-Dependent Mesoscale Structures of Polymeric Compounds (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.33]Nearly all polymeric materials employed for practical applications have non-equilibrium mesoscale structures critically influenced by processing. From melt-blown plastic bags, solution processed polymer membranes, to temperature-quenched block copolymers, non-equilibrium mesoscale structures are important for practical applications as well as understanding process-dependent structure-property relationships of polymers.
Recent investigations of non-equilibrium and transient structures of polymeric materials including flow and diffusion induced multi-scale mesoscale structures of polymer blends, reaction-induced microstructures of block copolymers, biopolymers, and self-assembled structures of micelles reveal that understanding process-dependent non-equilibrium structures requires multi-faceted considerations ranging from thermodynamic and chemical environments, dynamic and kinetic factors, and momentum and other field effects. This focus session aims to offer a venue to the community to review the recent progress of non-equilibrium mesoscale structures of polymer and related molecular systems to expand our understanding of the origin and controllability of non-equilibrium structures.

Sangwoo Lee (RPI), Michael Hore (Case Western), Douglas Tree (Brigham Young); lees27@rpi.edu, mah259@case.edu, tree.doug@byu.edu

01.01.11
Dynamics and Rheology of Polymers and Polyelectrolytes (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DBIO, DFD) [same as 02.01.34, 03.01.35, 04.01.21, 20.01.12]Polymers and polyelectrolytes in concentrated solutions and melts undergo highly-correlated many-body dynamics that produce a complex hierarchy of viscoelastic relaxation modes in the flowing polymer liquid. These dynamics emerge from the complex interactions of polymer topology, chemistry, and charge that span many time, length, and energy scales. Understanding and controlling these dynamics is challenging but essential for controlling and improving polymer processing in industrial and biomedical applications. This focus session will broadly cover recent advances in understanding the microscopic dynamics and macroscopic rheology of polymers and polyelectrolytes and their applications.

Vivek Sharma (UIC), Thomas O'Connor (Sandia); viveks@uic.edu, toconno@sandia.gov

01.01.12
Polyelectrolyte Complexation (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 02.01.35, 04.01.33]The phenomenon of polyelectrolyte complexation can take many forms including coacervation, precipitations, and multilayer assembly, among others. Understanding the fundamental physics of these complexes, as well as how these complexes can be manipulated through a variety of stimuli including salt, pH, temperature is of utmost importance for a wide variety of applications including, but not limited to underwater adhesives, drug-delivery, and membranes. This focus session covers all aspects of polyelectrolyte complexation, including the structure, dynamics and rheology of complexes, advances in chemical synthesis techniques and all methods of study, as well as emerging application areas in these systems.

Samanvaya Srivastava (UCLA), Debra Audus (NIST); samsri@ucla.edu, debra.audus@nist.gov

01.01.13
Dynamic Polymer Networks (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 02.01.36, 04.01.32]This session will focus on the exciting class of dynamically associated polymers, and includes dynamic supramolecular and dynamic covalent polymer networks held together by associative bonds (such as in vitrimers), or by reversibly dissociating covalent bonds, respectively. Studies exploring the viscoelastic relaxation timescales, the role of supramolecular bond lifetimes, and applying diverse experimental techniques (NMR, rheology and dielectric spectroscopy, among others) to understand dynamics, self-healing and re-processability of these materials are welcome. Phase behavior and crystallization, as well as are various functional properties of these materials are also of interest. Experimental, theory and simulation work is encouraged.

Chris Evans (UIUC), Svetlana Sukhishvili (TAMU); cme365@illinois.edu, svetlana@tamu.edu

01.01.14
Molecular Glasses (DPOLY, DSOFT, DCP, DMP) [same as 02.01.37, 05.01.10]Molecular glasses are important models for understanding fundamental aspects of amorphous systems and also important materials for organic electronics and coatings. Systems of interest include vapor-deposited glasses, geologically-aged glasses, stable glasses, and organic semiconductor glasses. This session on molecular and atomic glasses includes theory, simulations, and experiment that explore structure and properties, including stability, energy, and relaxation processes.

Mark Ediger (Wiscon-Madison), Zahra Fakhraai (UPenn); ediger@chem.wisc.edu, fakhraai@sas.upenn.edu

01.01.15
Dynamics of Glassy Polymers Under Nanoscale Confinement (DPOLY, DSOFT, DCP) [same as 02.01.38, 05.01.08]The properties of polymer glasses under nanoscale confinement has remained poorly understood despite more than two decades of activity. The presence of interfaces can induce changes in polymer dynamics at the segmental and chain scale, the mechanical properties, and the effects tend to persist over surprisingly long length scales depending on the polymer chemistry, architecture, presence of additives such as nanoparticles or solvents, and the nature of the confining surfaces. In this session, we solicit theoretical, experimental, and computational studies of the effects of nanoscale confinement on glass-forming polymers and related materials.

Rob Riggleman (UPenn); rrig@seas.upenn.edu

01.01.16
Polymers and Soft Solids at Interfaces: Tribology, Wear, Rheology and Interactions (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DFD, DMP) [same as 02.01.39, 03.01.36, 20.01.13]Tribology studies the friction, wear, and lubrication of interacting surfaces in relative motion. It is highly multidisciplinary, and includes complex physics, interfacial science and rheology and materials science. Tribology is industrially relevant for many polymer surfaces and fluid interfaces, and macroscopic (tribometers) and microscopic (probe or AFM) techniques have been used for these studies. However many complexities, including heat generated through friction, surface wear that deposits debris in the lubricating fluid or on the surface, and low modulus of soft substrates, have been a challenge to fundamental understanding. In addition, the underlying physics and interfacial rheology of using functional surfaces such as those with porous structures, brushes or patterns remain largely unexplored. The purpose of this session is to provide a forum for recent experimental and theoretical developments, to improve the understanding of polymer tribology, wear and interfacial interactions and foster collaboration within the varied scientific communities.

Cathy Jackson (Dow), Saad Khan (NCSU); CLJackson@dow.com, khan@eos.ncsu.edu

01.01.17
Confinement, Dynamics, and Ion Interactions in Ion-Containing Polymers (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.40]Ion-containing polymers are rapidly emerging options for energy storage and conversion, water treatment, sensors, and actuators. The current scientific thrust is to develop practically viable polymer electrolytes, especially in the solid state. Designing new materials requires a fundamental understanding of structures, dynamics, and ionic interactions within, giving rise to better transport processes of ionic carriers in polymer matrices. This session will focus on efforts to uncover and describe confinement-entitled features and mechanisms of ionic transport in ion-containing polymers. Topics will include progress in understanding and development of single-ion conductors and integration of experimental characterizations with theory and computation. We encourage contributions that quantitatively explore correlations among molecular-level structure and non-covalent interactions, multi-scale morphological ordering, ionic internal and rotational dynamics, and diffusive and/or driven ionic transport.

Moon Jeong Park (Postech); moonpark@postech.ac.kr

01.01.18
Polymers with Special Architectures: From Molecular Design to Physical Properties (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.41]In this session, we aim to give a better understanding of universal factors that control polymer physics through synthesis, structure and physical properties of polymers with special architectures. In particular, we encourage researches using star polymers, hyperbranched polymers, polymer brushes, helical polymers, etc.

Keiji Tanaka (Kyushu U, Japan), Reika Katsumata (UMass); k-tanaka@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp, katsumata@mail.pse.umass.edu

01.01.19
Polymer Crystals and Crystallization (DPOLY, DSOFT, DMP) [same as 02.01.42]This focus session invites presentations related to polymer crystals and crystallization with the focus on molecular level understanding of polymer crystal structure, morphology, and crystallization pathway. Correlation of the crystalline structure, morphology and crystallization process with mechanical, transport (e.g. electron, ion, gas), and dielectric properties are of interest. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following studies: chain architecture and polymer crystallization, transport behavior in polymer crystal-containing systems, polymer crystallization in hybrid systems: epitaxy, graphoepitaxy and soft epitaxy; structural and morphological development of ordered polymer chains in hard and/or soft confined space; ultra-small polymer crystals; ultra-large polymer crystals; curved, scrolled and twisted crystals; polymer crystallization during processing. Both theoretical and experimental studies are welcome.

Christopher Li (Drexel), Toshikazu Miyoshi (Akron); chrisli@drexel.edu, miyoshi@uakron.edu

01.01.20
Polymer structure formation and dynamics in solution (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 04.01.39, 02.01.76]The impact of polymer chain dynamics and assembly in solution ranges from discovery of new, highly controlled materials to understanding and mimicking the complexity of nature in equilibrated or non-equilibrated state. For example, dynamics of polymer chains in solution can influence flows, interfacial behavior like lubrication, and other bulk properties. Assembled conjugated polymeric aggregates tremendously impacts their optoelectronic property. Structure formation in solution can simulate biological assemblies and produce almost infinite morphological possibilities. Structure formation depends on the chemical details of the backbone, the precise location of interaction, backbone flexibility, pedant sidechain groups and polymer solvent interactions. These effects encompass many impactful discoveries, like micelles, coacervates, and biologically-inspired assemblies. Contributions to this focus session will highlight recent advances in polymer solution assembly and dynamics, as well as new tools, data interpretation, computational method and theory. This includes a broad range of physical behaviors and systems, including block copolymers, polyelectrolytes, functional conjugated polymers, doped polymers, grafted polymers, ring polymers, dendritic polymers, and others. Studies can include both equilibrium and non-equilibrium behaviors in the presence of external stimuli. Works on unique structures, polymeric architecture, morphologies, functional polymeric material, and new structure-property relationships are particularly encouraged. Combination of experimental results and simulation is highly welcomed.

Xiaodan Gu (The University of Southern Mississippi), Svetlana Morozova (Case Western Reserve University); xiaodan.gu@usm.edu, sam381@case.edu

01.01.21
Polymers and block copolymers at interfaces (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.44]The physical chemistry of interfacial region between two phases is important in adhesion, lubrication, material design and synthesis, membranes, and colloidal systems. The interfaces can also be used as the loci for crystallization, polymerization, copolymerization, or grafting. The session is a good fit but not limited to following topics: kinetics of adsorption at the interface, surface/interfacial rheology of amphiphilic macromolecules, self-assembly of block copolymers in solvents and at interfaces, conformation of polymers and block copolymers at the interface, the effect of polymers on colloidal stability, (co)polymerization at the surface, grafting to/from surfaces, the importance of surface forces for pattern formation on surfaces, etc.

Reza Foudazi (New Mexico State University); rfoudazi@nmsu.edu

01.01.22
Polymers in extreme environments (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.45]In many applications, polymeric materials are subjected to extreme environments, including high strain and high strain rate mechanical deformation. Such deformation can lead to non-linear deformation, instabilities, fracture, and heat generation causing local melting and thermal degradation. This focus session will cover a diverse set of experimental, computational, and theoretical studies capturing the physical aspects of polymeric materials in extreme conditions. The submissions capturing responses of homo or block polymers, polymer gels and networks, composites, and mechanical metamaterials in the form of thin films and bulk materials will be of interest. The focus session will also seek submissions related to the impact of projectiles on polymeric materials in the ballistic and hypervelocity range.

Santanu Kundu (Mississippi State University); santanukundu@che.msstate.edu

01.01.23
Structure-function correlations of porous polymers for membrane applications (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 02.01.46, 04.01.40]Porous organic polymers (POP) represent an interesting class of materials that are suitable for various applications due to their excellent gas separation performances, catalytic abilities, energy storage capacities, and anti-microbial activity. Their superior porous structure, tailorable functionalities, low cytotoxicity, and biocompatibility have attracted unprecedented attention in gas separation, energy and biomedical fields. Recent investigations have resulted in several significant breakthroughs contributing to the strategic evolution of the design and synthetic approaches of porous organic materials with tunable characteristics. This focus session solicits contributions that demonstrate recent experimental and theoretical efforts in the development of porous organic polymers and nanostructured materials, including synthetic methodologies, self-assembly, structure-function correlations and thermodynamics.

Venkat Padmanabhan (Tennessee Tech); vpadmanabhan@tntech.edu

01.01.24
Molecular and ion transport in polymers (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP, DCP) [same as 02.01.47, 04.01.36, 16.01.20, 05.01.19]Molecular and ion transport play critical roles in gas separation/purification, water purification/desalination and ionic conduction. Despite extensive experimental and theoretical research focused on understanding molecular and ionic transport in polymeric media, we still lack a practical guidance on how to design polymers exhibiting superior transport properties. Multiple studies in the area of gas separation and ion transport demonstrated that number of structural and dynamic parameters are important to promote diffusion of ions and gas molecules. In this session, research related to the diffusion of ion and small molecules including various gases in polymer-based membranes will be discussed.

Vera Bocharova (ORNL), Rajeev Kumar (ORNL); bocharovav@ornl.gov, kumarr@ornl.gov

01.01.25
Self-assembly in polymer blends and nanocomposites (DPOLY)Polymer self-assembly has been investigated extensively over the past few decades as a way to rationally engineer material properties, where the addition of nanoscale fillers or other polymers has proven to be a fruitful way to augment self-assembling behavior. Synthetic advances have introduced new polymer chemistries and chain architectures (e.g. branched, bottlebrush, multiblock) as well as nanoscale fillers with a variety of properties. Meanwhile, new processing pathways are made possible by layering strategies, in situ polymerization, and other emerging methods. These work together in polymer blends and nanocomposites to dramatically alter the energy landscape for self-assembly. This focus session will highlight recent research that increases our understanding of how self-assembled phases, ordering kinetics, and dynamic or functional properties change with compositional variation in polymer blends and nanocomposites. Both experimental and theoretical contributions are welcome.

Gregory Doerk (Brookhaven National Laboratory); gdoerk@bnl.gov

01.01.26
Optics and photonics in polymers and soft matter (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DAMOP) [same as 02.01.48, 04.01.41, 06.01.11]The length scales in common between optical phenomena and those readily accessible in polymers and soft matter have provided a unique opportunity: many optical techniques are well-suited for exploring important polymer physics problems, and soft matter offers advantageous methods for fabricating structures of interest for photonics. This Focus Session invites contributions on all aspects of optics and photonics pertaining to polymer science and soft matter. Possible topics of interest may include: fluorescence or single-molecule measurements of polymer dynamics, super-resolution microscopy and imaging, fabrication of optical materials and devices, etc.

Chaitanya Ullal (RPI), Danielle J. Mai (Stanford University); ullalc@rpi.edu, djmai@stanford.edu

01.01.27
Dynamics of polymers and electrolytes in bulk and in confinement (DPOLY, GERA) [same as 21.01.07]Multi-scale dynamics within materials are responsible for their physical properties. Understanding the dynamics at a broad range of length and time scales of polymers and electrolytes in bulk and in various confining matrices is critical for their practical applications. Furthermore, the techniques and the instruments that can provide the information at a wide spectrum of the temporal and spatial levels are equally important too. This focus session aims to showcase the contribution of various techniques, especially the neutron scattering, to explore the diffusivity and the diffusion mechanism at an atomic/molecular level of various polymers and electrolyte systems. Contributions from molecular dynamic simulations together with others spectroscopic techniques are also welcome.

Laura R. Stingaciu (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), Naresh C Osti (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); stingaciulr@ornl.gov, ostinc@ornl.gov

01.01.28
Topological effects in soft and condensed matter (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP, DCP) [same as 02.01.49, 04.01.37, 16.01.21, 05.01.20]Topological effects resulting from interplay of geometry and shape of molecules play key roles in affecting their properties and responses to external forces. Extensive research has been focused on understanding equilibrium properties of topological effects in two dimensions for superconductors. New frontiers in this direction emerge along dynamics of topological defects, owing to relevant advances in computational capacity and experiments. In parallel, understanding topological effects present in melts of long polymers, rings and knotted polymers have been at the forefront of research in polymer physics. In this session, experimental and theoretical research related to the topological effects in soft and condensed matter including polymers, liquid crystals, ferroic and magnetic materials will be discussed. The intentionally interdisciplinary scope of the session is designed to bring together and synergize disparate research activities that share topological common ground

Rajeev Kumar (ORNL), Petro Maksymovych (ORNL); kumarr@ornl.gov, maksymovychp@ornl.gov

01.01.29
Non-linear polymers, nanocomposites and blends (DPOLY)Over the last decades, linear polymer chains have been commonly used to develop polymer based nanocomposites and blends with superior and tunable physical properties. Thanks to the recent advances in synthetic chemistry, ‘non-linear’ polymer topologies, such as stars, combs, bottlebrushes, rings, hyper-branched and internally cross-linked polymers, have become available with unique structural and dynamical features that cannot be provided by their linear chain analogs. While these polymer architectures have been studied in neat form, their behavior in presence of solid surfaces, nanoparticles and chemically dissimilar polymers is a relatively new area that is full of fundamental physics and potential applications. This new DPOLY focus session aims to bring together theoreticians and experimentalists to exchange ideas on the topics of synthesis of non-linear polymers with precisely controlled shape and dimensions; multiscale structural and dynamical characterization of these polymers in their bulk form, thin films, nanocomposites and blends.

Erkan Senses (Koc University); esenses@ku.edu.tr

01.01.30
Machine learning for biomolecular design and simulation (DPOLY, GDS, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP) [same as 23.01.14, 02.01.43, 04.01.38, 16.01.22]Advances in machine learning (ML), along with the increased ability of generating and processing large datasets, are stimulating a fundamental shift in the approach to scientific discovery. This focus session seeks to explore how ML is transforming biomolecular design and simulation. ML is revolutionizing biomolecular design by enabling the prediction of protein function and structure from sequences, while contributing to a deeper understanding of the sequence-structure-function relationship. In biomolecular simulation, ML promises to enable simulations with the accuracy of first-principle calculations and the performance of phenomenological interatomic potentials; along with new approaches to perform and analyze simulations.

Stefano Martiniani (University of Minnesota)

01.01.31
Developments in reflectivity for thin film characterization (DPOLY, DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.51, 02.01.51]Reflectivity based methods are mainstays for characterizing thin film compositions and structure. These methods are used to study a broad range of materials including membranes, block copolymers, nanoparticle assemblies and model biological systems. This session will bring together researchers with an interest in methods such as specular reflectivity, GISAXS and ellipsometry. Topics will include developments in methods such as in-situ characterization techniques, advances in experimental design and data analysis, and explorations of novel material systems.

Daniel Sunday (NIST); daniel.Sunday@nist.gov

01.01.32
Charged polymers for neuromorphic applications (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP, DCP) [same as 02.01.50, 04.01.35, 16.01.19, 05.01.18]Polymers have several properties that make them ideal candidates for two-terminal memristors and other neuromorphic devices such as low cost, mechanical flexibility, straightforward solution phase synthesis, and biocompatibility. However, there are also challenges to overcome before they can be broadly adopted, including environmental sensitivity, stability, slow switching, and poor conduction. In addition, their inherent electrical properties are often masked by those of the electrodes. Part of the difficulty is due to the lack of direct evidence for determining the mechanisms responsible for conductive bistability, which could include any combination of one or more of the following: charge transfer, phase change, conformational change, redox chemistry, or thermal effects. Charged polymers introduce long-range electrostatic forces that can influence assembly at the nanoscale, and by extension, ion mobility. In this session, research related to how charged polymers affect the search space for neuromorphic devices like memristors will be presented. Charge cohesion effects in block copolyelectrolytes can result in the formation of nanostructures that are inaccessible to neutral block copolymers. For charged, amphiphilic homopolymers, covalent grafting of ionic headgroups to hydrophobic tails can result in structures that self-assemble into membranes that mimic lipid bilayers but are significantly more stable. In addition to device fabrication, the fundamental physics governing assembly of charged soft materials capable of learning and memory will be discussed.

C. Patrick Collier (ORNL), Bradley Lokitz (ORNL); colliercp@ornl.gov, lokitzbs@ornl.gov

01.01.33
Sustainable Polymers: Fundamental Properties, Applications, and Design for End-of-Life (DPOLY)Recently there has been significant interest in the development of polymers with a reduced environmental impact. Biomass and other renewable resources are attractive substitutes for petroleum sources for polymers. Grand challenges remain in matching the diverse properties of traditional, petroleum-derived polymers. Furthermore, the end-of-life behavior of polymers has come under recent scrutiny. Design of polymers with more facile routes to recycling or other end-of-life options can have a significant impact on reducing polymer waste. This focus session includes all aspects of polymer sustainability, including fundamental property relationships of polymers derived from renewable resources, tailoring sustainable polymers for targeted applications, and design of new materials for ease of end-of-life management.

Megan Robertson, University of Houston / Joe Stanzione, Rowan University

01.01.34
Electrostatic Manipulation of Fluids and Soft Matter (DSOFT, DPOLY, DBIO, DFD) [same as 02.01.03, 04.01.30, 20.01.16]
01.01.35
Wetting and Adhesion of Soft Materials : Dynamics and Instability (DSOFT, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 02.01.01, 03.01.39]
01.01.36
Active Matter and liquid crystals in biological and bio-inspired systems (DSOFT, DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 02.01.02, 04.01.29, 03.01.40]
01.01.37
Soft mechanics via geometry (DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.10]
01.01.38
From responsive matter to actuated structures (GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 03.01.48]
01.01.39
Native and non-native protein structure and stability (GSNP, DBIO, DPOLY) [same as 03.01.09, 04.01.31]
01.01.40
Physics of Genome Organization: From DNA to Chromatin (DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.11, 03.01.21, 02.01.56]
01.01.41
Macromolecular Phase Separation (DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.12, 03.01.22, 02.01.63]
01.01.42
Biomaterials (DBIO, DMP, DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 04.01.05, 02.01.64]
01.01.43
Mechanics of cells and tissues (DBIO, DSOFT, GSNP DPOLY, DFD ) [same as 04.01.02, 02.01.72, 03.01.24, 20.01.14]
01.01.44
Electronic-vibrational coupling in light harvesting (DCP, DCOMP, DCMP, DPOLY, DAMOP) [same as 05.01.01, 16.01.25, 06.01.09]
01.01.45
Coherent Nonlinear Optical Microscopy (DCP, DBIO, GSNP, DSOFT, DPOLY, DLS) [same as 05.01.03, 04.01.22, 03.01.29, 02.01.75, 24.01.03]
01.01.46
Density Functional Theory and Beyond (DCP, DCOMP, DCMP, DPOLY) [same as 05.01.05, 16.01.24]
01.01.47
The Chemical Physics of Molecules in Space (DCP, DCMP, DPOLY) [same as 05.01.06]
01.01.48
Building the bridge to exascale: applications and opportunities for materials, chemistry, and biology (DCOMP, DBIO, DCP, DPOLY, DMP, DAMOP, DCMP) [same as 16.01.02, 04.01.24, 05.01.13, 06.01.08]
01.01.49
Understanding glasses and disordered systems through computational models (DCOMP, DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 16.01.07, 02.01.70, 03.01.27]
01.01.50
Emerging trends in molecular dynamics simulations and machine learning (DCOMP, GDS, DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 16.01.11, 23.01.12, 02.01.71]
01.01.51
Physics of Emergent Protein-Complex Assemblies (DBIO, DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.53, 02.01.57]
01.01.52
Physics of Biofilms (DBIO, DFD, DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.48, 20.01.23, 02.01.55]
01.01.53
Rheology of Gels (DSOFT, DBIO, GSNP, DPOLY, DFD) [same as 02.01.14, 04.01.43, 03.01.47, 20.01.20]
01.01.54
Physics of Bio-inspired Materials (DSOFT, DBIO, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.15, 04.01.42]
01.01.55
Programmable Matter (DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.07, 03.01.15]
01.01.56
FOCUS TOPIC CANCELLED (DSOFT, DPOLY, DBIO, DFD) [same as 02.01.17, 04.01.44, 20.01.21]
01.01.57
Active Matter Physics of Cell Colonies (DBIO, DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.14, 02.01.58]
01.01.58
Physical Properties of Biomolecular Condensates (DBIO, DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.15, 02.01.53]
01.01.59
Physics of Proteins: Progress on Structure-Function Relationships (DBIO, DPOLY) [same as 04.01.16]
01.02.00
DPOLY Standard Sorting Categories
01.03.00
Semi-Crystalline Polymers
01.04.00
Liquid Crystalline Polymers
01.05.00
Polymer Glasses and Glass Formation
01.06.00
Polymer Rheology
01.07.00
Polymeric Networks, Elastomers, and Gels
01.08.00
Charged and Ion-Containing Polymers
01.09.00
Polymer Composites
01.10.00
Electrically and Optically Active Polymers
01.11.00
Surfaces, Interfaces, Thin Films, and Coatings
01.12.00
Biopolymers and Sustainable Polymers

Soft Condensed Matter (DSOFT)

02.00.00
DSOFT Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
02.01.00
DSOFT Focus Sessions
02.01.01
Wetting and Adhesion of Soft Materials: Dynamics and Instability (DSOFT, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 01.01.35, 03.01.39]The wetting and adhesion properties of soft materials are relevant for a wide range of applications including hydro/omniphobic coatings, medical dressing, and MEMS/NEMS devices. In many situations, the macroscopic properties crucially depend on the physical processes localized near a contact-line where the two materials and a liquid/gas phase meet. When dealing with Hookean solids and Newtonian fluids, models have been developed to successfully bridge macroscopic linear behavior with contact line dynamics. Yet, many open questions arise concerning the local dissipative processes operating in dynamical regimes for more complex materials and interfaces.

Julien Chopin chopin.phys@gmail.com UFBA

02.01.02
Active Matter and liquid crystals in biological and bio-inspired systems (DSOFT, DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 04.01.29, 01.01.36, 03.01.40]Fascinating soft materials, often with intricate organizations and unusual properties that derive from shape and out-of-equilibrium mechanics, are ubiquitous in many biological and bio-inspired systems. Recent research investigates these biological soft materials at the interface of liquid crystals and active matter, in 2D and more recently, in 3D, uncovering new physical phenomena in biology and soft materials. Examples include research in dense collections of biopolymers, bacterial suspensions, cellular tissues, and composite systems created from biological materials or cells coexisting with biocompatible liquid crystals. This focus session will bring together experimentalists and theorists to share their recent progress on understanding the physics of these biological and bio-inspired systems in the perspective of active matter and liquid crystals. The session will promote further developments and invoke interdisciplinary efforts in unifying different frameworks to elucidate the intriguing physics of soft, biological materials from semi-dilute to dense limit.

Kimberly Weirich, weirich@clemson.edu, University of Chicago

02.01.03
Electrostatic Manipulation of Fluids and Soft Matter (DSOFT, DPOLY, DBIO, DFD) [same as 01.01.34, 04.01.30, 20.01.16]This session aims to bring together researchers from various electrostatic communities from DSOFT, DPOLY, DBIO, and DFD including, liquid crystal and block copolymer orientation, electrospinning, electrospray, ionic propulsion, electrophoresis of active matter, electroporation, electrowetting, electrohydrodynamics, and soft robotics.

Jonathan Singer, jonathan.singer@rutgers.edu Rutgers University

02.01.04
Morphing matter: from soft robotics to 4D printing (DSOFT, GSNP) [same as 03.01.38]From soft robotics to 4D printing research labs are abound with examples of smart morphable matter capable of interacting with their environment solely on the basis of their material properties. These responsive, malleable and programmable materials often derive their remarkable functional properties from their structure rather than their chemistry alone. We are seeking contributions studying the fundamental and practical aspects of such morphing materials. Particularly, we are interested in (1) the mechanisms of amplification of an input via the architecture of the materials and (2) the programmability of a complex response using a simple mode of actuation.

Andrej Kosmrlj andrej@princeton.edu Princeton University

02.01.05
Microflows Meet Soft Matter: Compliance, Growth, Instabilities and Beyond (DSOFT, DFD, GSNP) [same as 20.01.17, 03.01.41]
02.01.06
Machine Learning in Nonlinear Physics and Mechanics (DSOFT, GSNP, DCOMP) [same as 03.01.42, 16.01.27]Machine learning has generated much recent excitement within the physics community, and provides a powerful new tool to analyze and understand many physical systems. Usage of machine learning is still in its infancy, and many interesting challenges remain unexplored. What machine learning methods are most appropriate? How do we use these tools most effectively? Should experimental procedures be redesigned to take advantage of machine learning?

Chris Rycroft chr@seas.harvard.edu Harvard University

02.01.07
Programmable Matter (DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 03.01.15, 01.01.55]Mechanical, biological and chemical systems have recently demonstrated the ability to realize, process and relay information in ways and at scales superior to that of traditional electronic computing. This focus session on programmable matter addresses how logical operations, pattern recognition, optimization and other computing tasks may be realized in diverse material systems, and how these logical operations may be used to generate novel structures. The proposed session will address similar work from a different novel perspective, integrating the work of existing communities.

Zeb Rocklin, Georgia Institute of Technology zebrocklin@gatech.edu

02.01.08
Emergent mechanics of active, robotic, and living materials (DSOFT, GSNP) [same as 03.01.37]The physical properties of nonequilibrium matter can differ fundamentally from those of equilibrium systems, and mechanics is no exception. Recently, several groups have demonstrated that assemblies of active, dynamic, or driven elements can harbor unique large-scale mechanical and acoustic properties such as one-way transport, nonreciprocity, self-locomotion, and controlled amplification. While the specific realizations range from metamaterials to robotic assemblies to biological networks, they share the unifying theme that the novel mechanical behavior emerges from interactions among active building blocks. Progress in this area will involve both theoretical and computational advances to describe the elastic properties of dynamic assemblies, as well as experimental developments to fabricate and characterize candidate materials with nonequilibrium elements. This focus session aims to showcase new and future developments in this burgeoning field, and to bring together researchers from diverse disciplines to work towards a common physical framework and inspire new collaborations.

Jayson Paulose University of Oregon, Anton Souslov University of Bath Corentin Coulais, Univ of Amsterdam

02.01.09
Active matter in complex environments (DSOFT, DBIO, GSNP, DFD) [same as 04.01.01, 03.01.23, 20.01.14]Active matter is a prominent area of research in soft matter and biological physics: it gives us the opportunity to learn new physics (active materials are out of equilibrium), engineer new materials (e.g. "intelligent" responsive materials), and learn more about biology (e.g. cells, migratory animals, and even subcellular motor proteins are active materials). While a tremendous amount of work has focused on the physics of active matter in bulk/unconfined environments, recent work is starting to demonstrate the rich physics associated with active matter in complex environments characterized by tortuosity, confinement, and complex interactions. In these cases, environmental interactions can strongly impact motility behaviors and collective phenomena like flocking, clustering, and phase separation. This session will focus on this new direction in active matter research.

Sujit Datta, ssdatta@princeton.edu, Princeton

02.01.10
Soft mechanics via geometry (DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 01.01.37]A broad variety of soft structures of current and perennial interest derive their mechanical response from properties that are less material than geometric. Symmetries, structural thinness, metric constraints such as curvature or twist, fractal dimension, complex patterning and structural correlations statistics are all geometrical quantities that can determine patterns of stress, strain and nonlinear deformations across a system. Such considerations are widespread in the soft, nonlinear, polymer and bio communities at APS. This session focuses on a variety of problems in soft mechanics where geometry plays a critical role, and showcase common themes in the emergent properties of these systems.

Zeb Rocklin, Georgia Institute of Technology zebrocklin@gatech.edu

02.01.11
Origin of rigidity and the nature of the yielding transition in solids (DSOFT)
02.01.12
Kinetic theory and its applications in the physical, biological and social sciences (DSOFT)Kinetic theory is a powerful technique in theoretical physics that allows to derive an effective macroscopic description of a physical system by integrating out formally its underlying microscopic degrees of freedom. First formulated in the context of dilute gases, it is still widely used throughout the sciences nowadays. The aim of this proposed Focus Session is twofold: On the one hand, it will provide a pedagogical introduction to t is important technique accessible also to non-experts. On the other hand, it will present an overview of the state-of-the-art research employing this methodology not only in physics, but also in biology, finance and the social sciences. Therefore, we believe that the outline of this session can be of exceptional interest for the membership of GSOFT and related units, as it can potentially novel applications of this fundamental technique.

Andrea Cairoli andrea.cairoli11@imperial.ac.uk Imperial College Kanazawa Kiyoshi (kiyoshi@sk.tsukuba.ac.jp) The University of Tsukuba Sano Tomohiko (tomohiko.sano@epfl.ch) Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

02.01.13
Quantitative stress imaging: from elastomers to biological tissues to image-based modeling (DSOFT, GMED) [same as 25.01.03]Medical physics has developed a variety of approaches to quantify stress in tissue: MRI, (micro)CT, X-ray, Ultrasound, mechanical measurements and optical modalities. These imaging techniques present a broad research field, spanning multiple scales (from nanometers to meters) and different applications (in-vivo, ex-vivo, and in-situ). The soft matter community has simultaneously developed similar quantitative stress imaging methods, additionally including mechanochemical sensors, fluorescence, photo-elasticity, rheo-optics and DIC. This session intends to provide a platform for exchange of perspectives between medical and soft matter physicists on quantitative stress imaging. One particular goal is to better combine quantitative stress measurements with computer simulations of deformations in tissue and other soft materials.

Joshua Dijksman, joshua.dijksman@wur.nl, Wageningen University

02.01.14
Rheology of Gels (DSOFT, DBIO, GSNP, DPOLY, DFD) [same as 04.01.43, 01.01.53, 03.01.47, 20.01.20]Gels, nonfluid networks of particles or polymers that are pervaded by fluid, appear ubiquitously within soft matter systems in practical applications as well as in living biological systems. The mechanical properties of gels are intermediate between those of fluids and solids, and depend sensitively on the strucure of the gel constituents across multiple length scales. This focus session invites experimental, theoretical, and computational studies of the rheological properties of gels, including chemical and physical gels, hydrogels, colloidal gels, and biological gels, with particular interest and emphasis on connecting structural properties to flow properties. Contributions examining the effect of non-equilibrium activity (driven by molecular motors or by active particles) on gel mechanics are strongly encouraged.

Emanuela Del Gado, Georgetown University ed610@georgetown.edu,

02.01.15
Physics of Bio-inspired Materials (DSOFT, DBIO, DPOLY) [same as 04.01.42, 01.01.54]Material scientists have long been inspired by nature seeking to use bioinspired design principles to engineer materials with superior properties. The goal of this session is to create a platform for experts working on bioinspired materials, to discuss the underlying novel material physics across different length and time scales and its role in determining functional material properties. We expect this session will become a unique forum that not only provides the physical understanding of bioinspired materials, but also offers physical insights to advance the design of future bioinspired systems for broad applications by addressing the current scientific and technological challenges.

Topics will include:

· Physics of self-assembly or self-organization approaches for bioinspired materials
· Physics of top-down and/or bottom-up approaches for making hierarchical structures
· Physics of 3D printing of biomaterials or bioinspired structures
· Structure-function relationships in bioinspired materials/structures
· Bridging extreme mechanics in the lab to biological systems in nature
· Physics of bioinspired sensing and actuation
· Physics of bioinspired surfaces and interfaces
· Physics of bioinspired optical materials/structures
· Physics of stimuli-responsive behaviors of bioinspired materials/structures
· Physics of bioinspired load-bearing and energy-dissipative materials

Ling Li, lingl@vt.edu, Virginia Tech

02.01.16
Soft matter physics in a geophysical context (DSOFT, DFD) [same as 20.01.22]Planetary surfaces present a wealth of soft matter physics phenomena, with striking patterns often forming through the deformation and flow of geomaterials that are "soft" on geological timescales. This session aims to bring together the geophysical and soft matter communities to understand how such phenomena arise, whether through remote sensing, laboratory experiments, field studies, or numerical simulations.

Karen Daniels, kdaniel@ncsu.edu, NC State University

02.01.17
FOCUS TOPIC CANCELLED (DSOFT, DPOLY, DBIO, DFD) [same as 01.01.56, 04.01.44, 20.01.21]
02.01.18
Memory Formation in Matter: Encoding, Reading, and Design (DSOFT, GSNP, DCMP) [same as 03.01.46]Memory is an emerging perspective on non-equilibrium matter that brings history-dependence, dynamics, disorder, and diversity together with information, adaptation, and design. Examples range from suspensions, foams, and gels that recall past deformations, to dynamical systems that gradually adapt to repeated driving, to self-assembling particles that encode desired structures. This session will bring together current research into the wide array of memory phenomena in non-equilibrium systems, with the aim of highlighting common principles, patterns, and distinctions.

Nathan Keim, keim@psu.edu jdpaulse@syr.edu, Pennsylvania State University

02.01.19
Programmable Self-assembly: Particle, Interaction and Pathway Design (DSOFT)Programmable self-assembly has been a long-standing goal for physics, material science, and biology. Many efforts towards this goal use different kinds of building blocks, such as colloids, DNA, and proteins. Completing the full cycle of efficiently synthesizing these building blocks, designing their interactions, and constructing the optimal pathway is getting much attention from people working in soft matter. For this focus session, we want to bring together people working on programmable self-assembly from all sides to share their approaches and facilitate discussion. Topics ranging from building block synthesis to theoretical design frameworks are all welcome.

Itai Cohen, Cornell; Michael Brenner, Harvard

02.01.20
Physics of proteins: the molecular machines of life (DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 04.01.52]
02.01.21
Textiles and topology: physics of knots and tangles (GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 03.01.03]
02.01.22
Granular Flows Beyond Simple Mechanical Models (GSNP, DSOFT, DFD) [same as 03.01.04, 20.01.24]
02.01.23
Deformable particles in soft materials (GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 03.01.05]
02.01.24
Physics of Liquids (GSNP, DSOFT, DCP, DFD) [same as 03.01.08, 05.01.11, 20.01.19]
02.01.25
Glassy dynamics: from simple models to biological tissues (GSNP, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 03.01.18, 04.01.18]
02.01.26
Mechanical metamaterials (GSNP, DSOFT, DMP) [same as 03.01.06]
02.01.27
Steerable particles: new ways to manipulate fluid-mediated forces (GSNP, DFD, DSOFT) [same as 03.01.10, 20.01.18]
02.01.28
Geometrically-frustrated instabilities in solid mechanics (GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 03.01.11]
02.01.29
Polymer Nanocomposites: From Fundamentals to Applications (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP) [same as 01.01.04, 03.01.33]
02.01.30
Hierarchical Structural Emergence in Elastomer Nanocomposites: Dispersion, Dynamics, Structure, Modeling, and Simulation (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.05]
02.01.31
Responsive Polymers, Soft Materials, and Hybrids (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 01.01.07, 04.01.20]
02.01.32
3D Printing of Polymers and Soft Materials: From Chemistry and Processing to Devices and Characterization (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DFD, FIAP) [same as 01.01.08, 03.01.34, 20.01.11, 22.01.11]
02.01.33
Non-equilibrium and Process-Dependent Mesoscale Structures of Polymeric Compounds (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.10]
02.01.34
Dynamics and Rheology of Polymers and Polyelectrolytes (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DBIO, DFD) [same as 01.01.11, 03.01.35, 04.01.21, 20.01.12]
02.01.35
Polyelectrolyte Complexation (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 01.01.12, 04.01.33]
02.01.36
Dynamic Polymer Networks (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 01.01.13, 04.01.32]
02.01.37
Molecular Glasses (DPOLY, DSOFT, DCP, DMP) [same as 01.01.14, 05.01.10]
02.01.38
Dynamics of Glassy Polymers Under Nanoscale Confinement (DPOLY, DSOFT, DCP) [same as 01.01.15, 05.01.08]
02.01.39
Polymers and Soft Solids at Interfaces: Tribology, Wear, Rheology and Interactions (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DFD, DMP) [same as 01.01.16, 03.01.36, 20.01.13]
02.01.40
Confinement, Dynamics, and Ion Interactions in Ion-Containing Polymers (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.17]
02.01.41
Polymers with Special Architectures: From Molecular Design to Physical Properties (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.18]
02.01.42
Polymer Crystals and Crystallization (DPOLY, DSOFT, DMP) [same as 01.01.19]
02.01.43
Machine learning for biomolecular design and simulation (DPOLY, GDS, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP) [same as 01.01.30, 23.01.14, 04.01.38, 16.01.22]
02.01.44
Polymers and block copolymers at interfaces (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.21]
02.01.45
Polymers in extreme environments (DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.22]
02.01.46
Structure-function correlations of porous polymers for membrane applications (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 01.01.23, 04.01.40]
02.01.47
Molecular and ion transport in polymers (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP, DCP) [same as 01.01.24, 04.01.36, 16.01.20, 05.01.19]
02.01.48
Optics and photonics in polymers and soft matter (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DAMOP) [same as 01.01.26, 04.01.41, 06.01.11]
02.01.49
Topological effects in soft and condensed matter (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP, DCP) [same as 01.01.28, 04.01.37, 16.01.21, 05.01.20]
02.01.50
Charged polymers for neuromorphic applications (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP, DCP) [same as 01.01.32, 04.01.35, 16.01.19, 05.01.18]
02.01.51
Developments in reflectivity for thin film characterization (DPOLY, DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.31, 04.01.51]
02.01.52
Immune Sensing and Response (DBIO, DCP, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.04, 05.01.12]
02.01.53
Physical Properties of Biomolecular Condensates (DBIO, DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.15, 01.01.58]
02.01.54
Physics in Synthetic Biology (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.13]
02.01.55
Physics of Biofilms (DBIO, DFD, DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.48, 20.01.23, 01.01.52]
02.01.56
Physics of Genome Organization: From DNA to Chromatin (DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.11, 01.01.40, 03.01.21]
02.01.57
Physics of Emergent Protein-Complex Assemblies (DBIO, DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.51, 04.01.53]
02.01.58
Active Matter Physics of Cell Colonies (DBIO, DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.14, 01.01.57]
02.01.59
Self-Organization in Biological Systems:Sub-Cellular to Tissue Scales (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.52]
02.01.60
Physics of the Cytoskeleton across Scales (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.08]
02.01.61
Robophysics: Robotics Meets Physics (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.09]
02.01.62
Morphogenesis (DBIO, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.10, 03.01.20]
02.01.63
Macromolecular Phase Separation (DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.12, 01.01.41, 03.01.22]
02.01.64
Biomaterials (DBIO, DMP, DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 04.01.05, 01.01.42]
02.01.65
Flow of Complex Fluids: Rheology, Structure and Instabilities (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 20.01.06]
02.01.66
Drops (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 20.01.07]
02.01.67
Active Colloids (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 20.01.08]
02.01.68
Thin Films, Surface Flows and Interfaces (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 20.01.09]
02.01.69
Swimming, Motility, and Locomotion (DFD, DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 20.01.03, 04.01.25]
02.01.70
Understanding glasses and disordered systems through computational models (DCOMP, DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 16.01.07, 03.01.27, 01.01.49]
02.01.71
Emerging trends in molecular dynamics simulations and machine learning (DCOMP, GDS, DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 16.01.11, 23.01.12, 01.01.50]
02.01.72
Mechanics of Cells and tissue (DBIO, DSOFT, GSNP DPOLY, DFD ) [same as 04.01.02, 03.01.24, 01.01.43, 20.01.15]
02.01.73
Water Dynamics in Different Environments: Experiment and Theory (DCP, DCOMP, DBIO, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 05.01.04, 16.01.26, 04.01.23, 03.01.28]
02.01.74
Soft Matters in Industrial Applications (DSOFT, FIAP) [same as 22.01.03]
02.01.75
Coherent Nonlinear Optical Microscopy (DCP, DBIO, GSNP, DSOFT, DPOLY, DLS) [same as 05.01.03, 04.01.22, 03.01.29, 01.01.45, 24.01.03]
02.01.76
Polymer structure formation and dynamics in solution (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 04.01.39, 01.01.20]
02.01.77
Irreversible dynamics and aging: from cells to organisms (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.54]
02.02.00
DSOFT Standard Sorting Categories
02.03.00
Colloids and Granular Materials
02.04.00
Emulsions and Foams
02.05.00
Liquid Crystals
02.06.00
Membranes, Micelles and Vesicles
02.07.00
Gels and Complex Fluids
02.08.00
Disordered and Glassy Systems (non-polymeric)
02.09.00
Fracture, Friction, and Deformation
02.10.00
Self-and Directed Assembly (Equilibrium and Non-equilibrium)
02.11.00
Active Materials
02.12.00
Rheology and Flow of Soft Materials
02.13.00
Mechanical Metamaterials
02.14.00
Extreme Mechanics

Statistical and Nonlinear Physics (GSNP)

03.00.00
GSNP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
03.01.00
GSNP Focus Sessions
03.01.01
Control of noisy non-linear dynamical systems (GSNP, DBIO) [same as 04.01.45]Most macroscopic systems in nature evolve in time in the presence of either extrinsic or intrinsic noise. Understanding these noisy nonlinear dynamical systems has thus always been of central importance and interest in contemporary physics. Stochastic fluctuations, noise-induced correlations, spontaneous pattern formation, and even generically scale-invariant phases play an essential role in characterizing non-equilibrium systems and constitute a highly active field of current research, both in experimental studies as well as in analytical theory and numerical investigations. Moreover, exploring potential external control of their characteristic features has become a fertile research area in recent years,addressing the design, optimization, and emergent behavior of stochastic non-linear systems.

Uwe C. Tauber, Virginia Tech

03.01.02
Collective Behavior in Driven Granular Media (GSNP, DCMP)Although granular materials have received considerable attention, we still do not have a complete description of their collective behavior under external driving. This focus session will highlight studies aimed at understanding crystallization in both wet and dry granular materials undergoing vibration, cyclic and continuous shear, and other external driving mechanisms. Studies of the evolving structure and the dynamics (such as nucleation and growth) during crystallization will help establish a theoretical framework for ordering transitions in driven, dissipative systems. We seek abstracts from interdisciplinary researchers in mechanics, physics, materials science and engineering performing experimental, theoretical, and computational studies of collective behavior, especially crystallization, in driven in granular materials. This focus session will catalyze new collaborations aimed at understanding how external driving controls the collective dynamics of granular media.

Corey O'Hern, Yale University

03.01.03
Textiles and topology: physics of knots and tangles (GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.21]Textiles are some of the most ubiquitous materials in our every day lives. They are incredibly strong, lightweight and have low bending rigidity for their weight. However, very little is known rigorously about the physics that underlies these behaviors. The complexity of this problem arises from the numerous knots and tangles that convert 1D threads into 2D surfaces with 3D geometry. This session aims to target the multiscale physics that gives stretchiness to our sweaters and pleats to our pants.

Elisabetta Matsumoto, Georgia Tech

03.01.04
Granular Flows Beyond Simple Mechanical Models (GSNP, DSOFT, DFD) [same as 02.01.22, 20.01.24]This focus session will explore outstanding issues related to granular flow and packing beyond simple mechanical models. Though most studies of granular materials have treated the particulates as spherical, granular materials exhibit a wide-range of complex shapes and sizes with varying material compositions and structure. This focus session will address the effect of particle shape and distribution of sizes on complex, nonlinear granular flows including shear thinning, shear thickening and jamming of dense suspensions and dry granular materials.

Gary Grest, Sandia National Laboratories

03.01.05
Deformable particles in soft materials (GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.23]Soft materials such as foams, emulsions, cell monolayers, and tissues are comprised of complex, non-spherical particles that can deform in response to applied stress. Particle-scale deformability determines the mechanical properties of these materials, such as linear response and jamming, yet the majority of numerical research on soft materials has been performed using models of particles that cannot change shape. This session will focus on studies of complex soft materials with explicitly deformable particles, and how particle deformability influences mechanical stability, jamming onset, glassy behavior, and response to perturbations like compression, shear, and both active and thermal excitations.

Corey O'Hern, Yale University

03.01.06
Mechanical metamaterials (GSNP, DSOFT, DMP) [same as 02.01.26]The field of mechanical metamaterials investigates materials with properties obtained by architecture rather than composition or chemistry. The field has seen an explosion of activity in recent years largely due to the advent of advanced fabrication and computational techniques. Mechanical metamaterials have demonstrated properties that are untenable in traditional engineering materials, such as negative Poisson’s ratio, negative thermal expansion coefficient, and negative bulk modulus, and they have been shown to have novel shape changing and programmable behaviors. Many of these materials uniquely capitalize on non-linearities to achieve their properties and can be activated by external stimuli such as heat, pressure, electric fields or chemical activity. This field lies at the cusp between physics, engineering and mathematics, and this session aims to bring together researchers from diverse backgrounds to form new interdisciplinary connections. Talks will be organized around three areas of 1) design/fabrication, 2) static properties and 3) dynamic properties of mechanical metamaterials.

Lucas Meza, University of Washington

03.01.07
Noise-driven dynamics in far-from-equilibrium systems (GSNP, DBIO) [same as 04.01.17]Recently, there has been impressive experimental and theoretical progress to quantitatively characterize noise-driven dynamics in far-from-equilibrium systems. Examples abound in diverse systems such as active biological matter, electronic transport circuits, climate models, micro- and nano-mechanical oscillators, as well as voting models and financial markets. Common features include the observation and characterization of non-vanishing probability currents in steady state, the development of novel metrics to quantify how far systems are from equilibrium behavior, the quantitative characterization of detailed balance violation - an essential feature in the functioning of many non-equilibrium systems, and the generalization of fluctuation-dissipation relations. The proposed session is targeted to both experimentalists and theorists from a range of traditional fields spanning biophysics, nonlinear and statistical physics, and condensed matter physics, for whom it will be stimulating to explore common sets of new and emerging experimental techniques and analytical tools for understanding the noisy dynamics of far-from-equilibrium systems.

Stephen Teitsworth Duke University

03.01.08
Physics of Liquids (GSNP, DSOFT, DCP, DFD) [same as 02.01.24, 05.01.11, 20.01.19]Liquids, ubiquitous on earth, are prototypical disordered condensed matter. Its very existence is remarkable, thanks to the delicate balance between interparticle potential and entropy. The phase behaviors of liquids and liquid-like matter, especially when driven out of equilibrium by extreme conditions, are exceptionally rich. Accordingly, the physics of liquids have attracted much attention in the recent decades. In addition, numerous soft and biological materials of amazing far-from-equilibrium complexity seem to share many intriguing features of liquids. Therefore, quantitative descriptions of the structure and dynamics of liquids and liquid-like matter will likely impact a wide range of disciplines in physics, chemistry, and materials science and engineering. The proposed session at APS March Meeting will focus on the forefront of the research on liquids, from fresh theoretical treatments and computations to cutting-edge experimental techniques.

Yang Zhang, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

03.01.09
Native and non-native protein structure and stability (GSNP, DBIO, DPOLY) [same as 04.01.31, 01.01.39]In this focus session, we seek talks on novel experimental and computational approaches to predicting and determining protein structure and stability. Topics in this session will include protein structure prediction and refinement, decoy detection, the influence of experimental techniques on protein structure, and the response of protein structure to amino acid mutations. We especially welcome studies of proteins that apply techniques in machine learning to understand protein structure and dynamics.

Corey O'Hern, Yale University

03.01.10
Steerable particles: new ways to manipulate fluid-mediated forces (GSNP, DFD, DSOFT) [same as 20.01.18, 02.01.27]The transport of fluid-suspended objects by various driving forces is ubiquitous in near-surface planetary environments. In addition to hydrodynamic and Brownian forces, individual particles can experience a number of novel "phoretic" forces that steer their motion. Up until now studies of such "steerable particles" have been performed separately, often without recognition of their common theme. The goal of this proposed Focus Session is to encourage a broad range of scientists who work on these driven systems to get together, communicate, and identify common interests, possible collaborations, and future directions.

Justin Burton, Emory University

03.01.11
Geometrically-frustrated instabilities in solid mechanics (GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.28]In recent years there has been a great deal of interest in instabilities of solids that are generated by, or controlled through, geometrical frustration. Examples in thin solid structures include: wrinkling instabilities that are caused by enforced changes of curvature as well as snap-through, which can be caused by a change in the amount of geometric confinement available. In these scenarios, not only is the instability itself generated by some geometrical frustration, but the resulting instability can be heavily influenced by such frustration. For example, wrinkle patterns generically prefer constant wavelength or wavenumbers, but can be prevented from reaching these pure states by geometry. This focus session will bring together experts working on different aspects of how such frustrated elastic instabilities can be described across a broad range of systems.

Dominic Vella University of Oxford

03.01.12
Mpemba effect: the path not taken (GSNP, DCP) [same as 05.01.17]
03.01.13
Statistical mechanics of disease propagation (GSNP, DBIO) [same as 04.01.46]Long before COVID-19 became a household name, a variety of statistical mechanics approaches were developed to tackle the problem of disease propagation in systems with complex transmission environments. This session focuses on the application of such techniques to the evolution, prediction, and possible control of the COVID-19 outbreak. The models may range from homogeneously mixing (mean-field) populations to studies with behavioral feedback and/or spatial or social structure in the population. Techniques could include network analysis, compartmental modeling, epidemiology, percolation concepts, and general nonequilibrium approaches. Relevant disease propagation work that does not explicitly address COVID-19 is also appropriate for this session.

Cynthia Reichhardt, LANL

03.01.14
Non-linear dynamics in biological cells (GSNP, DBIO) [same as 04.01.47]
03.01.15
Programmable Matter (DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.07, 01.01.55]
03.01.16
Stochastic thermodynamics of biological and artificial information processing (GSNP, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.23]The recent revolution in non-equilibrium statistical physics has allowed researchers to significantly advance and generalize Landauer's original results concerning the thermodynamics of bit-erasure into a full-fledged “thermodynamics of information processing”, which analyzes computational systems ranging from information ratchets to digital circuits, all the way up to Turing machines. At the same time, our understanding of the information processing within biological cells has greatly expanded, driving an explosion of work on the thermodynamics of biological information processing, including processes such as polymerization, kinetic proofreading, and cellular sensing. We feel the time is right to consolidate these research thrusts, in a single GSNP focus topic on the thermodynamics of information processing / computation in both biological and artificial (human-engineered) systems.

David Wolpert, Santa Fe Institute

03.01.17
The Statistical Physics of Real-world Networks (GSNP)
03.01.18
Glassy dynamics: from simple models to biological tissues (GSNP, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 02.01.25, 04.01.18]
03.01.19
Evolutionary and Ecological Dynamics (DBIO, GSNP) [same as 04.01.07]
03.01.20
Morphogenesis (DBIO, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.10, 02.01.62]
03.01.21
Physics of Genome Organization: From DNA to Chromatin (DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.11, 01.01.40, 02.01.56]
03.01.22
Macromolecular Phase Separation (DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.12, 01.01.41, 02.01.63]
03.01.23
Active matter in complex environments (DSOFT, DBIO, GSNP, DFD) [same as 02.01.09, 04.01.01, 20.01.14]
03.01.24
Mechanics of cells and tissues (DBIO, DSOFT, GSNP DPOLY, DFD ) [same as 04.01.02, 02.01.72, 01.01.43, 20.01.15]
03.01.25
Physics of Social Interactions (DBIO, GSNP) [same as 04.01.03]
03.01.26
Computational methods for statistical mechanics: advances and applications (DCOMP, GSNP) [same as 16.01.08]
03.01.27
Understanding glasses and disordered systems through computational models (DCOMP, DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 16.01.07, 02.01.70, 01.01.49]
03.01.28
Water Dynamics in Different Environments: Experiment and Theory (DCP, DCOMP, DBIO, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 05.01.04, 16.01.23, 04.01.23, 02.01.73]
03.01.29
Coherent Nonlinear Optical Microscopy (DCP, DBIO, GSNP, DSOFT, DPOLY, DLS) [same as 05.01.03, 04.01.22, 02.01.75, 01.01.45, 24.01.03]
03.01.30
Granular, Porous Media, and Multiphase Flows (DFD, GSNP) [same as 20.01.01]
03.01.31
Fluid Structure Interactions (FSI) (DFD, GSNP) [same as 20.01.02]
03.01.32
Electric Polarization in Polymer Physics (DPOLY, GSNP, DCP, DCOMP) [same as 01.01.03, 05.01.07, 16.01.18]
03.01.33
Polymer Nanocomposites: From Fundamentals to Applications (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP) [ same as 01.01.04, 02.01.29]
03.01.34
3D Printing of Polymers and Soft Materials: From Chemistry and Processing to Devices and Characterization (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DFD, FIAP) [same as 01.01.08, 02.01.32, 20.01.11, 22.01.11]
03.01.35
Dynamics and Rheology of Polymers and Polyelectrolytes (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DBIO, DFD) [same as 01.01.11, 02.01.34, 04.01.21, 20.01.12]
03.01.36
Polymers and Soft Solids at Interfaces: Tribology, Wear, Rheology and Interactions (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DFD, DMP) [same as 01.01.16, 02.01.39, 20.01.13]
03.01.37
Emergent mechanics of active, robotic, and living materials (DSOFT, GSNP) [same as 02.01.08]
03.01.38
Morphing matter: from soft robotics to 4D printing (DSOFT, GSNP) [same as 02.01.04]
03.01.39
Wetting and Adhesion of Soft Materials : Dynamics and Instability (DSOFT, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 02.01.01, 01.01.35]
03.01.40
Active Matter and liquid crystals in biological and bio-inspired systems (DSOFT, DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 02.01.02, 04.01.29, 01.01.36]
03.01.41
Microflows Meet Soft Matter: Compliance, Growth, Instabilities and Beyond (DSOFT, DFD, GSNP) [same as 02.01.05, 20.01.17]
03.01.42
Machine Learning in Nonlinear Physics and Mechanics (DSOFT, GSNP, DCOMP) [same as 02.01.06, 16.01.27]
03.01.43
Big Data in Physics (GDS, DCOMP, GSNP) [same as 23.01.01, 16.01.16]
03.01.44
Statistical and nonlinear physics of Earth and its climate (GPC, GSNP) [same as 26.01.02]
03.01.45
AI and Statistical/Thermal Physics (GDS, GSNP, DCOMP) [same as 23.01.08, 16.01.40]
03.01.46
Memory Formation in Matter: Encoding, Reading, and Design (DSOFT, GSNP, DCMP) [same as 02.01.18]
03.01.47
Rheology of Gels (DSOFT, DBIO, GSNP, DPOLY, DFD) [same as 02.01.14, 04.01.43, 01.01.53, 20.01.20]
03.01.48
From responsive matter to actuated structures (GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 01.01.38]
03.02.00
GSNP Standard Sorting Categories
03.03.00
Jamming and Glassy Behavior
03.04.00
Granular Materials and Flows
03.05.00
Active Matter
03.06.00
Systems Far from Equilibrium, including Fluctuation Theorems and Fluctuation-Dissipation Relations
03.07.00
Pattern Formation and Spatio-temporal Chaos
03.08.00
Chaos and Nonlinear Dynamics
03.09.00
Complex Networks and their Application
03.10.00
Statistical Mechanics of Social Systems such as Economics, Finance, Traffic Flow and Crowd Dynamics
03.11.00
Frustrated Systems, including constraint satisfaction, satisfiability and NP-complete problems
03.12.00
Extreme Mechanics
03.13.00
Population and Evolutionary Dynamics (DBIO, GSNP) [same as 04.03.00]
03.14.00
General Statistical and Nonlinear Physics
03.15.00
Shell Buckling

Biological Physics (DBIO)

04.00.00
DBIO Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
04.01.00
DBIO Focus Sessions
04.01.01
Active matter in complex environments (DSOFT, DBIO, GSNP, DFD) [same as 02.01.09, 03.01.23, 01.01.36, 20.01.14]
04.01.02
Mechanics of cells and tissues (DBIO, DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY, DFD ) [same as 02.01.72, 03.01.24, 01.01.43, 20.01.15]It is now indisputable that the physical environment critically regulates cell and tissue functions. However, only recently we have begun to understand how mechanical information such as mechanical stresses and strains are sensed and transmitted from molecules to cells to tissues, and vice versa.
This session will bring together a collection of experimental and theoretical work in nuclear, single-cell, and tissue mechanics, and cross talks between difference length scales. In addition, we will include work on how cell-cell interactions drive the collective emergent properties of cells and tissues.

Moumita Das, Rochester Institute of Technology, modsps@rit.edu 2. MingMing Wu, Cornell University, mw272@cornell.edu

04.01.03
Physics of Social Interactions (DBIO, GSNP) [same as 03.01.25]Social interactions shape our lives. Yet, their complexity challenges our ability to understand, model and even mimic optimal social network structures. The recent advent of physics of behavior studies is providing new insights into physical principles that govern social behavior: from short range interactions, e.g. plants that utilize the infra-red visual spectrum to distinguish shade producing plants from inanimate objects, to long range interactions, e.g. insect swarms who harness air-flow fields to coordinate thermoregulation.
This session will explore the boundary between such animate and related inanimate physical interactions, how social interactions are governed by physics, and vice versa, how other interactions between entities we tend to consider as inanimate could be social. We will draw from a diverse range of efforts to address it including experimental work as well as theoretical, computational, and robotic models.

Orit Peleg/University of Colorado Boulder/ Greg J Stephens/Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam & Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology/gjstephens@gmail.com

04.01.04
Immune Sensing and Response (DBIO, DCP, DSOFT) [same as 05.01.12, 02.01.52]The immune system is essential to our health, and yet its understanding is in its infancy. In particular, immune sensing and response, often the first steps in widely divergent systemic decisions, present key targets for manipulation and modeling. Indeed, in recent years study of these processes has yielded increasing abundance of quantitative data, along with the development of powerful theoretical and simulation methods. As a result, a community of physicists interested in immunology has been forming gradually. This Focus Session aims to bring together a broad range of experimentalists and theoreticians interested in immune sensing and response, further supporting the immuno-physics community as it gathers momentum. Given the infancy of the field, we particularly encourage participation by early career researchers, reflected in our choice of invited speakers.

Ned Wingreen, Princeton University

04.01.05
Biomaterials (DBIO, DMP, DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.64, 01.01.42]
04.01.06
Physics of Proteins (DBIO)Proteins are key constituents of all living cells and they play a direct role in health and disease. This session will encompass theory and experiment and will cover a wide range of topics including but not restricted to structure-function relationships, the role of peptides and disordered proteins.

Wouter Hoff, Oklahoma State University, Jayanth Banavar, University of Oregon Wei Wang, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China, wangwei@nju.edu.cn Dongping Zhong, Ohio State University, zhong.28@asc.ohio-state.edu

04.01.07
Evolutionary and Ecological Dynamics (DBIO, GSNP) [same as 03.01.19]
04.01.08
Physics of the Cytoskeleton across Scales (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.60]These focus sessions will explore the physics of molecular motors and cytoskeletal systems on length scales ranging from the molecular to the cellular. We will bring together single-molecule approaches, theoretical, and computational research to dissect the physical mechanisms underlying cellular function and behavior. We will focus on work that connects molecular-level features with cellular-level properties of molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments. These focus sessions will explore determinants for molecular motor function, showcasing recent work on the novel impact of cargo membrane on motor-based transport, and the modulation of the motor's load-bearing capacity by force geometry and the microtubule track. Moreover, we will explore the cytoskeletal filaments and their assemblies, showcasing recent findings on the structure and dynamics of the actin network, and their modulation by actin-binding proteins.

Jing Xu (University of California, Merced, jxu8@ucmerced.edu) Serapion Pyrpassopoulos (University of Pennsylvania, serappyr@pennmedicine.upenn.edu) James Liman (Rice University, jl135@rice.edu), Carlos Bueno (Rice University, Carlos.Bueno@rice.edu)

04.01.09
Robophysics: Robotics Meets Physics (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.61]Building on the robophysics Focus Sessions at APS MM in 2016-2020 (see Aguilar et al, Rep. Prog. Physics, 2016), we propose a Robophysics Focus Session in 2021. Robots are moving from the factory floor and into our lives (autonomous cars, homecare assistants, search and rescue devices, etc). However, despite the fascinating questions such future “living systems” pose for scientists, the study of such systems has been dominated by engineers and computer scientists. We propose that interaction of researchers studying dynamical systems, soft materials, and living systems can help discover principles that will allow physical robotic devices to interact with the real world in qualitatively different ways than they do now. And we propose that a Focus Session at the APS March meeting that brings together leaders in this emerging area (most of whom are not physicists) will demonstrate the need for a physics of robotics and reveal interesting problems at the interface of nonlinear dynamics, soft matter, control and biology. This focus session addresses the urgent need to establish a new field of robophysics--physics for complex "living" robotic systems (analogous to biophysics, physics for complex biological systems).

Chen Li, Johns Hopkins University, Dan Goldman, Georgia Tech, daniel.goldman@physics.gatech.edu

04.01.10
Morphogenesis (DBIO, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 03.01.20, 02.01.62]The field of Morphogenesis lies at the intersection between physics, biology, and engineering. Morphological shapes of biological tissues and structures have inspired a plethora of scientists throughout history, especially since the D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson’s influential book titled "On Growth and Form" was published a century ago. Many recent activities have focused on understanding how biology has devised elaborate strategies for regulating pattern formation and mechanical forces in both space and time. Morphogenesis has also inspired scientists to design shape-programmable stimuli-responsive matter. This session aims at bringing together researchers from diverse backgrounds to forge new interdisciplinary connections.

Andrej Kosmrlj, Princeton University (andrej@princeton.edu) 2. Zi Chen, Dartmouth (zi.chen@dartmouth.edu) 3. Smitha Vishveshwara, UIUC (smivish@illinois.edu)

04.01.11
Physics of Genome Organization: From DNA to Chromatin (DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.40, 03.01.21, 02.01.56]In nature and during infection, populations of bacterial cells often exist in surface-attached, spatially structured communities called biofilms. Understanding the physical principles behind the formation of such complex communities in space and time requires an integrated approach stretching from biomolecules to intracellular networks to continuum mechanics of the whole biofilm. Physically inspired approaches at all these levels have provided powerful tools to explore molecular mechanisms and to uncover the biophysical principles of biofilm formation. In this Focus session, we will bring together a collection of talks at the interface of biology and physics, focusing on the cell-cell and cell-surface interactions in the biofilm context. These principles will be presented for a variety of bacterial communities in a rich variety of biological contexts. Emerging experimental techniques and concepts will be highlighted. The target audience is all physicists with an interest in microbiology, biomechanics, active matter, and collective behavior.

Bin Zhang (MIT) Alexandre V. Morozov/Rutgers University/morozova@physics.rutgers.edu

04.01.12
Macromolecular Phase Separation (DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.41, 03.01.22, 02.01.63]Macromolecular phase separation is increasingly appreciated to play a fundamental role in a wide range of cellular processes. Often these processes rely on one or more aspects of the particular material properties of the biomolecular condensates formed following phase separation of specific proteins, RNAs, or sugars. An understanding of how condensate material properties such as viscosity, surface tension, phase equilibria, and aging emerge from the multiple interactions between constituent macromolecules remains elusive, as do general principles for how these properties are regulated within cells and tuned by evolution. Progress requires quantitative measurements on diverse experimental model systems combined with new theoretical and computational frameworks to both describe sequence-dependent interactions between heteropolymers on the molecular level and to account for non-equilibrium aspects of the dynamics on the cellular scale. By bringing experimental, computational, and theoretical physicists from the polymer science, biophysics, statistical physics and soft matter communities together with biologists and bioinformaticians, this focus session aims to foster interdisciplinary communication and collaboration in this exciting area.

Ned Wingreen, Princeton University Yaojun Zhang/Princeton University/yaojunz@princeton.edu Patrick McCall/Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics Daphne Klotsa / University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill / dklotsa@email.unc.edu

04.01.13
Physics in Synthetic Biology (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.54]Synthetic biology has high relevance to biological physics. Yet, this has not been sufficiently highlighted at March Meetings. At the 2018 March Meeting, Nigel Goldenfeld said to the APS audience: "Ask not what you can do for biology, but what biology can do for you". Now, biological physicists should learn about what synthetic biology can do for them. The session will highlight how synthetic biological engineering of cells and molecules provides research tools for biological physics, to interrogate biological systems at all scales through precise perturbations, quantitative readouts, parameter scans, revealing quantitative principles of biological organization and function.

Gabor Balaszi, Stony Brook, gabor.balazsi@stonybrook.edu 2. Guillaume Lambert, Cornell University, lambert@cornell.edu

04.01.14
Active Matter Physics of Cell Colonies (DBIO, DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.57, 02.01.58]
04.01.15
Physical Properties of Biomolecular Condensates (DBIO, DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.58, 02.01.53]
04.01.16
Physics of Proteins: Progress on Structure-Function Relationships (DBIO, DPOLY) [same as 01.01.59]
04.01.17
Noise-driven dynamics in far-from-equilibrium systems (GSNP, DBIO) [same as 03.01.07]
04.01.18
Glassy dynamics: from simple models to biological tissues (GSNP, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 03.01.18, 02.01.25]
04.01.19
Machine Learning and Data in Polymer Physics (DPOLY, DBIO, DCOMP, GDS, FIAP) [same as 01.01.01, 16.01.17, 23.01.11, 08.01.05]
04.01.20
Responsive Polymers, Soft Materials, and Hybrids (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 01.01.07, 02.01.31]
04.01.21
Dynamics and Rheology of Polymers and Polyelectrolytes (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DBIO, DFD) [same as 01.01.11, 02.01.34, 03.01.35, 20.01.12]
04.01.22
Coherent Nonlinear Optical Microscopy (DCP, DBIO, GSNP, DSOFT, DPOLY, DLS) [same as 05.01.03, 03.01.29, 02.01.75, 01.01.45, 24.01.03]
04.01.23
Water Dynamics in Different Environments: Experiment and Theory (DCP, DCOMP, DBIO, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 05.01.04, 16.01.26, 03.01.28, 02.01.73]
04.01.24
Building the bridge to exascale: applications and opportunities for materials, chemistry, and biology (DCOMP, DBIO, DCP, DPOLY, DMP, DAMOP, DCMP) [same as 16.01.02, 05.01.13, 01.01.48, 06.01.08]
04.01.25
Swimming, Motility, and Locomotion (DFD, DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 20.01.03, 02.01.69]
04.01.26
Biomechanics of Insect Flight (DFD, DBIO) [same as 20.01.04]
04.01.27
Physiological & Blood Flow (DFD, DBIO) [same as 20.01.05]
04.01.28
Flow Past Complex Objects (DBIO)
04.01.29
Active Matter and liquid crystals in biological and bio-inspired systems (DSOFT, DBIO, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 02.01.02, 01.01.36, 03.01.40]
04.01.30
Electrostatic Manipulation of Fluids and Soft Matter (DSOFT, DPOLY, DBIO, DFD) [same as 02.01.03, 01.01.34, 20.01.16]
04.01.31
Native and non-native protein structure and stability (GSNP, DBIO, DPOLY) [same as 03.01.09, 01.01.39]
04.01.32
Dynamic Polymer Networks (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 01.01.13, 02.01.33]
04.01.33
Polyelectrolyte Complexation (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 01.01.12, 02.01.35]
04.01.34
Magnetism in Biomedicine (GMED, GMAG, DBIO) [Same as 25.01.02, 10.01.10]
04.01.35
Charged polymers for neuromorphic applications (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP, DCP) [same as 01.01.32, 02.01.50, 16.01.19. 05.01.18]
04.01.36
Molecular and ion transport in polymers (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP, DCP) [same as 01.01.24, 02.01.47, 16.01.20, 05.01.19]
04.01.37
Topological effects in soft and condensed matter (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP, DCP) [same as 01.01.28, 02.01.49, 16.01.21, 05.01.20]
04.01.38
Machine learning for biomolecular design and simulation (DPOLY, GDS, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP) [same as 01.01.30, 23.01.14, 02.01.43, 16.01.22]
04.01.39
Polymer structure formation and dynamics in solution (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 01.01.20, 02.01.76]
04.01.40
Structure-function correlations of porous polymers for membrane applications (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO) [01.01.23, 02.01.46]
04.01.41
Optics and photonics in polymers and soft matter (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DAMOP) [same as 01.01.26, 02.01.48, 06.01.11]
04.01.42
Physics of Bio-inspired Materials (DSOFT, DBIO, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.15, 01.01.54]
04.01.43
Rheology of Gels (DSOFT, DBIO, GSNP, DPOLY, DFD) [same as 02.01.14, 03.01.47, 01.01.53, 20.01.20]
04.01.44
FOCUS TOPIC CANCELLED (DSOFT, DPOLY, DBIO, DFD) [same as 02.01.17, 01.01.56, 20.01.21]
04.01.45
Control of noisy non-linear dynamical systems (GSNP, DBIO) [same as 03.01.01]
04.01.46
Statistical mechanics of disease propagation (GSNP, DBIO) [same as 03.01.13]
04.01.47
Non-linear dynamics in biological cells (GSNP, DBIO) [same as 03.01.14]
04.01.48
Physics of Biofilms (DBIO, DFD, DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 20.01.23, 01.01.52, 02.01.55]In nature and during infection, populations of bacterial cells often exist in surface-attached, spatially structured communities called biofilms. Understanding the physical principles behind the formation of such complex communities in space and time requires an integrated approach stretching from biomolecules to intracellular networks to continuum mechanics of the whole biofilm. Physically inspired approaches at all these levels have provided powerful tools to explore molecular mechanisms and to uncover the biophysical principles of biofilm formation. In this Focus session, we will bring together a collection of talks at the interface of biology and physics, focusing on the cell-cell and cell-surface interactions in the biofilm context. These principles will be presented for a variety of bacterial communities in a rich variety of biological contexts. Emerging experimental techniques and concepts will be highlighted. The target audience is all physicists with an interest in microbiology, biomechanics, active matter, and collective behavior.

Jing Yan (Yale University) Vernita Gordon Rice University

04.01.49
Fluid Physics of Disease Transmission (DFD, DBIO) [same as 20.01.10]
04.01.50
AI & Real World Networks (GDS, DBIO) [same as 23.01.06]
04.01.51
Developments in reflectivity for thin film characterization (DPOLY, DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.31, 02.01.51,
04.01.52
Physics of proteins: the molecular machines of life (DSOFT, DBIO) [same as 02.01.20]
04.01.52
Self-Organization in Biological Systems:Sub-Cellular to Tissue Scales (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.59]Self-organization, the process by which interacting components organize and arrange themselves in higher-order structures and patterns, plays a critical role in biological form and function. This Focus session will explore physical rules and mechanisms that govern self-assembly, complexity, and phase separation in biological systems. It will showcase new results on the spontaneous emergence of spatiotemporal order at subcellular, cellular, and tissue scales due to the interplay of geometry, statistical mechanics, and mechanical/chemical properties. The invited talks will elucidate self-organization and shape changes in composite cytoskeletal droplets and provide a general framework for understanding phase separation in multi-component, liquid-like biological matter.

Moumita Das, Rochester Institute of Technology

04.01.53
Physics of Emergent Protein-Complex Assemblies (DBIO, DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 01.01.51, 02.01.57]The majority of proteins assembly into stable complexes or transient clusters in order to perform cellular functions. With up to 10^4 types of proteins in a cell at a given moment, their specific interactions and concentrations regulate the biochemical processes that are the essence of life. However, understanding the mechanism of protein assemblies and transient interactions are largely known. Investigating the physics of protein assemblies is essential for developing the physical principles for living systems from molecular underpinnings. The APS March meeting currently has gap between the physics of proteins sessions and the liquid-liquid phase separation sessions. Therefore, the outcome of this focus session would fill that gap by consolidating talks from the molecular underpinnings of transient protein-protein interactions to emergent complex assembly at the cellular scale. Ultimately, the interdisciplinary biological physics community would greatly benefit from this Focus Session at the 2021 APS March meeting.

Andrei Gasic, Department of Physics at University of Houston and Center for Theoretical Biological Physics at Rice University

04.01.54
Irreversible dynamics and aging: from cells to organisms (DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.77]In living systems, the fundamental processes of maintaining function and undergoing aging should be intimately connected to physical principles of decay, entropy, and information processing. While the overarching concepts for these processes in living systems are indeed understood, the detailed connection to a variety of physiological processes or to recent developments in nonequilibrium thermodynamics is still incomplete. In this session we will address the physical foundations of physiological aging spanning the scales of basic biochemistry to cells to whole organisms. We will also connect fundamental physical processes and limits of how living systems gain and maintain information or function. Submissions to this session should address the fundamental physics of these processes and should highlight either novel measurement and quantification techniques or the application of modeling approaches to new empirical biological observations. Work focusing on synthesizing multiple biological processes of aging or addressing common features across the tree of life are also particularly encouraged.

Christopher Kempes, Santa Fe Institute Srividya Iyer-Biswas/ Purdue University/ iyerbiswas@purdue.edu

04.02.00
DBIO Standard Sorting Categories
04.03.00
Population and Evolutionary Dynamics (DBIO, GSNP) [same as 03.13.00]
04.04.00
Physics of Neural Systems
04.05.00
Microbiological Physics (bacteria, viruses, fungi)
04.06.00
Cellular Biophysics (structure, mechanics, dynamics)
04.07.00
Physics of Cancer
04.08.00
Animal Behavior
04.09.00
Single-Molecule Techniques
04.10.00
Membranes and channels
04.11.00
Cytoskeleton (actin, microtubules, intermediate filaments, associated proteins and enzymes)
04.12.00
Systems and Synthetic Biology
04.13.00
Noise and Stochasticity in Biology
04.14.00
Physics of Tissues and Development
04.15.00
Physics of Biological Active MatterLiving cells are active objects that interact with each other and with the environment in very complex ways. This combination of activity and complex interactions can lead to the emergence of spectacular collective phenomena at both the sub-cellular and the multi-cellular scales, and such observations have stimulated the development of active matter physics. In recent years, the field has greatly advanced by (i) devising models that account for crucial aspects of the biological complexity, and (ii) performing experimental measurements that enable quantitative tests of theory. This focus session, and its associated invited symposium, will discuss this exciting progress, highlighting how phenomena such as spontaneous flows, jamming, chiral stresses, mechano-chemical patterns, and defect-mediated transitions are relevant for the biological function of systems ranging from active macromolecular assemblies to bacterial biofilms to epithelial tissues to developing embryos.

Ricard Alert, Princeton University, ricard.alert@princeton.edu Joshua Shaevitz / Princeton University / shaevitz@princeton.edu

04.16.00
Irreversible dynamics and aging: from cells to organisms
04.17.00
Biopolymers (DNA, RNA, biocompatible, gels)
04.18.00
Biomaterials (biological materials, biomineralization, gels, biomimetic, biocompatible materials)Natural, synthetic, and biomimetic biomaterials continue to be extremely interesting to biological physicists. Natural biomaterials, such as biominerals or photonic tissues, are exciting from a fundamental science point of view because of their complex formation mechanisms leading to spectacular mathematical structures or impressive functions, which need a physicist to figure out. Examples include the bicontinuous gyroid structure of sea urchin spines, formed by amorphous precursor phases and phase transitions entirely under biological control; the iridescent wings of butterflies and beetles, bird feathers, mollusk shell nacre, or iridovirus. Synthetic biomaterials are engineered to interact with living tissue for medical purposes, to either treat, repair, replace a tissue function, or to sense, detect, or diagnose a tissue behavior. Far from being just applied engineering, biomaterials need physicists to figure out their complex, dynamic and thermodynamic behavior before and after they are in contact with the living tissue. Examples include bone implants, stents, valves, etc. Biomimetic materials are inspired by natural ones, but outperform the natural ones, thus they are metamaterials. They may have a structure, self-assembly fabrication strategy, or function inspired by nature, but their composition is usually different, thus the result is better than the inspiring natural material.

Pupa Gilbert, University of Wisconsin- Madison

04.19.00
Nanoscale biophysics
04.20.00
Proteins (globular, enzymes, structured, unstructured)
04.21.00
Fluids Dynamics in Living Systems
04.22.00
Quantum Phenomena in Biology
04.23.00
Genomes, Proteomes and Omics
04.24.00
Biological Networks
04.25.00
Soft and Active Biomatter
04.26.00
Instrumentation and Analysis Technique Development (hardware, software, machine learning, big data)
04.27.00
Environment-living systems interaction, Ecology
04.28.00
Pattern Formation and Oscillations in Biology
04.29.00
Physics of Microbiomes and Bacterial Communities

Chemical Physics (DCP)

05.00.00
DCP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
05.01.00
DCP Focus Sessions
05.01.01
Electronic-vibrational coupling in light harvesting (DCP, DCOMP, DCMP, DPOLY, DAMOP) [same as 16.01.25, 01.01.44, 06.01.09]
05.01.02
Ultrafast Spectroscopies and Coherent Phenomena in the X-ray Domain (DCP, DCMP, DLS, DAMOP) [same as 24.01.02, 06.01.10]
05.01.03
Coherent Nonlinear Optical Microscopy (DCP, DBIO, GSNP, DSOFT, DPOLY, DLS) [same as 04.01.22, 03.01.29, 02.01.75, 01.01.45, 24.01.03]
05.01.04
Water Dynamics in Different Environments: Experiment and Theory (DCP, DCOMP, DBIO, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 16.01.26, 04.01.23, 03.01.28, 02.01.73]
05.01.05
Density Functional Theory and Beyond (DCP, DCOMP, DCMP, DPOLY) [same as 16.01.24, 01.01.46]
05.01.06
The Chemical Physics of Molecules in Space (DCP, DCMP, DPOLY) [same as 01.01.47]The physical conditions of the universe at large stretch beyond those typically found on Earth. Hence, the behavior of molecules in astrophysical contexts can provide novel insights into the origin and evolution of the universe at large and the individual bodies that make it up. This symposium is a celebration of the creativity allotted to the study of chemical physics not constrained by terrestrial limitations. Theoretical and experimental results are welcomed with applications to molecular astrophysics ranging from chemical reaction kinetics, to astrochemical simulations, to novel observations, and beyond.

Leah G. Dodson and Ryan C. Fortenberry

05.01.07
Electric Polarization in Polymer Physics (DPOLY, GSNP, DCP, DCOMP) [same as 01.01.03, 03.01.32, 16.01.18]
05.01.08
Dynamics of Glassy Polymers Under Nanoscale Confinement (DPOLY, DSOFT, DCP) [same as 01.01.15, 02.01.38]
05.01.09
Polymers Under Dynamic Environmental Conditions (DPOLY, DCP) [same as 01.01.09]
05.01.10
Molecular Glasses (DPOLY, DSOFT, DCP, DMP) [same as 01.01.14, 02.01.37]
05.01.11
Physics of Liquids (GSNP, DSOFT, DCP, DFD) [same as 03.01.08, 02.01.24, 20.01.19]
05.01.12
Immune Sensing and Response (DBIO, DCP, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.04, 02.01.52]
05.01.13
Building the bridge to exascale: applications and opportunities for materials, chemistry, and biology (DCOMP, DBIO, DCP, DPOLY, DMP, DAMOP, DCMP) [same as 16.01.02, 04.01.24, 01.01.48, 06.01.08]
05.01.14
First Principles modeling of excited-state phenomena in materials (DCOMP, DCP, DMP) [same as 16.01.04]
05.01.15
Modeling the electrochemical interface in aqueous solutions (DCOMP, DCP) [same as 16.01.12]
05.01.16
Physics and effects on transport of ion-ion correlation in electrolyte materials (DCOMP, DCP, DMP) [same as 16.01.13]
05.01.17
Mpemba effect: the path not taken (GSNP, DCP) [same as 03.01.12]
05.01.18
Charged polymers for neuromorphic applications (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP, DCP) [same as 01.01.32, 02.01.50, 04.01.35, 16.01.19]
05.01.19
Molecular and ion transport in polymers (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP, DCP) [same as 01.01.24, 02.01.47, 04.01.36, 16.01.20]
05.01.20
Topological effects in soft and condensed matter (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP, DCP) [same as 01.01.28, 02.01.49, 04.01.37, 16.01.21]
05.02.00
DCP Standard Sorting Categories
05.03.00
Structure and Spectroscopy of Molecules and Clusters
05.04.00
Chemical Dynamics and Kinetics
05.05.00
Liquids, Glasses and Crystals
05.06.00
Polymers and Soft Matter
05.07.00
Electronic Structure Theory
05.08.00
Biophysical Chemistry and Molecular Biophysics
05.09.00
Nanoscale Chemical Physics
05.10.00
Surfaces, Interfaces, and Materials
05.11.00
Chemical Physics in the Curriculum

Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics (DAMOP)

06.00.00
DAMOP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
06.01.00
DAMOP Focus Sessions
06.01.01
Disorder and Localization in AMO Systems (DAMOP, DCMP)Disorder can have a profound effect on matter, changing its properties. In quantum systems, its effects can be even stronger, for example localizing particles and causing systems fail to thermalize even in circumstances where the corresponding classical system would remain localized. This focus sessions will discuss how AMO systems are being used to study some of the most intriguing phenomena associated with disorder, such as Anderson localization, many-body localization, effects on strongly correlated transport, and fundamental alteration of phases of matter.

Kaden Hazzard (Rice University)

06.01.02
Topological States in AMO Systems (DAMOP, DCMP)Topology has played an increasing role in physics, giving rise to new phases of matter and nonequilibrium behavior. Often topology is linked with robust physical behaviors that are insensitive to perturbations, and may have applications to quantum materials, quantum sensing, and quantum computing. This focus session will focus on fundamental issues and applications of these topological states as realized in AMO systems, including, but not limited to, methods to understand, classify, and measure defects, band structures, and topologically ordered states in and out of equilibrium, and experimental studies of these phenomena.

Chuanwei Zhang (UT Dallas)

06.01.03
Hybrid/Macroscopic Quantum Systems, Optomechanics, and Interfacing AMO with Solid State/Nano Systems (DAMOP, DQI) [same as 17.01.14]Rapid progress is being made in engineering quantum systems of various types: ultracold matter, photonics, optomechanical systems, superconducting qubits, and more. Frontiers include controlling the quantum state of increasingly large and complex systems. This focus session will highlight research advancing these frontiers in individual macroscopic quantum systems, as well as research coupling different macroscopic degrees of freedom.

Mikael Rechtsman (Penn State)

06.01.04
Non-Equilibrium Physics with Cold Atoms and Molecules, Rydberg Gases, and Trapped Ions (DAMOP, DCMP)Non-Equilibrium Physics with Cold Atoms and Molecules, Rydberg Gases, and Trapped Ions Nonequilibrium dynamics is ubiquitous, but no organizing framework exists that is comparably comprehensive as for equilibrium behavior. Many special cases of nonequilibrium dynamics are known to harbor interesting features, many of which are forbidden in equilibrium. Special cases of dynamics with recent progress include Floquet dynamics, prethermalization, non-thermal fixed points, driven dissipative steady states, turbulence, systems with scarring, and localization. This focus session will describe theoretical and experimental advances in our understanding of all of these dynamics in a variety of AMO systems.

Erich Mueller (Cornell University)

06.01.05
Precision Many-Body Physics (DCOMP, DAMOP, DCMP) [same as 16.01.06]
06.01.06
Open Quantum Systems (DAMOP)No matter how isolated it is, a quantum system always has some remnant coupling to its environment. This can lead to decoherence, but also to new features, for example creating useful entanglement. This focus session will consider advances in our fundamental understanding and experimental advances concerning of the dynamics and steady states of open quantum systems, reservoir engineering, and applications thereof, for example to quantum sensing.

Dan Stamper-Kurn (Berkeley)

06.01.07
Advances in Quantum Technologies: Atomic Systems (DQI, DAMOP) [same as 17.01.03]
06.01.08
Building the bridge to exascale: applications and opportunities for materials, chemistry, and biology (DCOMP, DBIO, DCP, DPOLY, DMP, DAMOP, DCMP) [same as 16.01.02, 04.01.24, 05.01.13, 01.01.48]
06.01.09
Electronic-vibrational coupling in light harvesting (DCP, DCOMP, DCMP, DPOLY, DAMOP) [same as 05.01.01, 16.01.25, 01.01.44]
06.01.10
Ultrafast specroscopies and coherent phenomena in the x-ray domain (DCP, DCMP, DLS, DAMOP) [same as 05.01.02, 24.01.02]
06.01.11
Optics and photonics in polymers and soft matter (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DAMOP) [same as 01.01.26, 02.01.48, 04.01.41]
06.02.00
DAMOP Standard Sorting Categories
06.03.00
Bose-Einstein Condensates, Matter Optics, Atomic Interferometry, and Nonlinear Waves
06.04.00
Vortices, Rotation, Spin-orbit Coupling and Artificial Gauge Fields
06.05.00
Spinor Condensates, Magnetic and Spin Ordering in Optical Lattices
06.06.00
Systems with Long Range Interactions; Dipolar Gases, Rydberg atoms
06.07.00
Strongly Interacting Quantum Fermi and Bose Gases
06.08.00
Quantum Gases in Optical Lattices
06.09.00
Cold and Ultracold Molecules
06.10.00
Quantum Information Science in Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics
06.11.00
Quantum Gases in Reduced Dimension, Ladders, and other Novel Geometries
06.12.00
Few Body Physics in AMO systems
06.13.00
AMO Analogs of High Energy Physics or Field Theoretic Models
06.14.00
Driven and Dissipative AMO Systems
06.15.00
Trapped Ions
06.16.00
AMO Systems as Probes
06.17.00
General Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics

Topological Materials (DCMP)

07.00.00
DCMP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
07.01.00
DMP Focus Sessions
07.01.01
Topological materials: synthesis, characterization and modeling (DMP)There has been explosive growth in the study of topological insulators in which the combined effects of the spin-orbit coupling and time-reversal symmetry yield a bulk energy gap with novel gapless surface states that are robust against scattering. Moreover, the field has expanded in scope to include topological phases more complex materials such as Kondo systems, magnetic materials, and complex heterostructures capable of harboring exotic topologically nontrivial state of quantum matter. The observation of theoretical predictions depends greatly on sample quality and there remain significant challenges in identifying and synthesizing the underlying materials that have properties amenable to the study of the bulk, surface and interface states of interest. This topic will focus on fundamental advances in the synthesis, characterization and modeling of candidate topological materials in various forms including single crystals, exfoliated and epitaxial thin films and heterostructures, and nanowires and nanoribbons, in addition to theoretical studies that illuminate the synthesis effort and identify new candidate materials. Of equal interest is the characterization of these samples using structural, transport, magnetic, optical, scanning probe, photoemission and other spectroscopic techniques, and related theoretical efforts aimed at modeling various properties both in the surface/interface and in the bulk.

Sean Oh (Rutgers) ohsean@physics.rutgers.edu; Peter Armitage (Johns Hopkins) npa@jhu.edu

07.01.02
Dirac and Weyl semimetals: materials and modeling (DMP)The field of topological semimetals has developed dramatically over the past few years. After the initial prediction and discovery of Dirac and Weyl semimetals – materials whose low energy excitations can be described by the Dirac or Weyl equation of high-energy physics – the field has now expanded to include new low-energy excitations not possible in a high-energy setting. Semimetals with different degeneracy at crossing points or lines have been predicted. Transport theories and effects have been predicted and proposed in order to measure a small subset of the topological characteristics of the semimetals (such as Chern numbers). Furthermore, semimetals whose existence is guaranteed by filling constraints derived from the presence of certain orbitals at certain points in specific lattices have also been mentioned in the literature.
Distinct from conventional low carrier density systems, Dirac, Weyl and other semimetals are expected to possess exotic properties due to the nontrivial topologies of their electronic wave functions. A subset of the novel properties predicted include Berry phase contributions to transport properties, chiral anomaly, quantized nonlinear transport under circularly polarized light, protected Fermi arc surface states, suppressed scattering, optical control of topology, landau level spectroscopy, superconductivity, and non-local transport. While promising candidate materials exist for many but certainly not all of the topological semimetals, many phenomena have yet to be clearly resolved.
This focus topic aims to explore Dirac, Weyl and other new semimetals and the novel phenomena associated with them. We solicit contributions on predictions, new materials synthesis and characterization, new phenomena in topological semimetals, as well as studies on both conventional and unconventional semimetals, both in the bulk and on the surfaces of samples that accentuate the non-trivial topological character of the new semimetals.

Zhiqiang Mao (Penn State) zim1@psu.edu; Dima Pesin (Virginia) - dp7bx@virginia.edu

07.01.03
Topological superconductivity: materials and modeling (DMP)Topological superconductors are superconductors characterized by topological invariants associated with the band structure of the Bogoliubov quasiparticles. They have been a focus of significant experimental and theoretical efforts in view of their relevance to fundamental physical and mathematical concepts, and potential for quantum computation. Along with the search for bulk materials candidates, there has been much recent progress in studies of atomically thin films, artificially engineered structures, and the surfaces of bulk materials. This Focus Topic will cover topological superconductivity and the closely related non-centrosymmetric superconductivity in new experimental settings involving transition metal dichalcogenides, topological insulators, Weyl semi-metals, FeSe-based systems, graphene, engineered heterostructures, semiconducting nanowires, atomic chains and Shiba states, junctions with ferromagnets, quantum Hall states, and driven systems and Floquet states. This Focus Topic will also cover the new understanding of bulk materials candidates such as Sr2RuO4 and the emerging opportunities in platforms such as twisted bilayers of 2D materials, and advances in strategies for quantum information processing using topological superconductivity.

Peng Wei (UC Riverside) peng.wei@ucr.edu; Ulrich Welp (Argonne) welp@anl.gov; Daniel Agterberg (U. Wisc. Milwaukee) agterber@uwm.edu

07.01.04
Magnetic Topological Materials (DMP, GMAG) [same as 10.01.09]The intersection of long-range magnetic order with topological electronic states is developing into an exciting area in condensed matter physics. A variety of exotic quantum states have been predicted to emerge, such as the quantum anomalous Hall effect, Weyl semimetals, and axion insulators. There are many open questions that in these materials that have inspired rapid theoretical and experimental developments. For example, although the exciting phenomena listed above have been predicted, only a few experimental realizations have been found to date. However, there are several candidate materials that have been proposed or synthesized very recently, some in just the last year. This will be a focus session on theoretical predictions, experimental methods that are sensitive to the topological nature of magnetic materials, and the discovery of magnetic topological materials in both single-crystal, thin film, and heterostructure morphologies.

Claudia Felser (MPI Dresden) Claudia.Felser@cpfs.mpg.de; Sangwook Cheong (Rutgers U) sangc@physics.rutgers.edu; James Analytis (UC Berkeley) analytis@berkeley.edu

07.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
07.03.00
Electronic structure of topological materials (photoemission, etc.)
07.04.00
Topological insulators
07.05.00
Dirac and Weyl semimetals: theory
07.06.00
Defects in topological materials
07.07.00
Strong electronic correlations in topological materials
07.08.00
Topological spin liquids
07.09.00
Topological superconductors and superfluids: theory
07.10.00
Floquet topological systems
07.11.00
Integer quantum Hall effect
07.12.00
Fractional quantum Hall effect

Semiconductors, Insulators, and Dielectrics (FIAP)

08.00.00
FIAP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
08.01.00
FIAP Focus Sessions
08.01.01
Spin-Dependent Phenomena in Semiconductors, including 2D Materials and Topological Systems (GMAG, DMP, FIAP, DCOMP) [same as 10.01.06, 16.01.36]
08.01.02
Dopants and defects in semiconductors (DMP, DCOMP, FIAP) [same as 16.01.30]Defects profoundly affect the electronic and optical properties of semiconductors. They control charge carrier concentration, transport, and recombination rates. They also regulate mass-transport processes involved in migration, diffusion, and precipitation. The success of microelectronic and optoelectronic semiconductor devices has relied on the engineering of beneficial defects while mitigating unwanted defects. Understanding, characterizing, and controlling dopants and defects is essential for technologies such as lighting and power electronics, quantum information sciences, memory, and thin film solar cells. This focus topic is the physics of dopants and defects in existing and emerging semiconductors, from the bulk to the atomic scale, encompassing point, line, and planar defects, including surfaces and interfaces. We solicit abstracts on experimental, computational, and theoretical investigations of the electronic, structural, optical, and magnetic properties of dopants and defects in elemental and compound semiconductors, nanostructured materials such as nanowires and quantum dots, photodetectors, and light emitters. We especially encourage submissions on (1) defect management in wide-band-gap electronic materials such as diamond, group-III nitrides, and gallium oxide, (2) defects in inorganic semiconductors for photovoltaics, and (3) defects in two-dimensional materials for single photon emission and quantum sensing. In addition, we welcome abstracts on relevant techniques such as materials processing and advanced characterization.

Matthew McCluskey (Washington State University); mattmcc@wsu.edu; Zakaria Al Balushi (UC Berkeley) albalushi@berkeley.edu

08.01.03
Multiferroics, magnetoelectrics, spin-electric coupling, and ferroelectrics (DMP, DCOMP, FIAP) [same as 16.01.29]This focus topic covers the challenge of coupling magnetic and electric properties in diverse insulating materials as well as ferroelectricity in different materials classes.
Topics include:
Ferroelectricity in inorganic and organic materials
Bulk multiferroic and magnetoelectric oxides
Heterostructured magnetoelectrics such as thin film, pillar and nanostructured materials.
Metal-organic frameworks, organometallics, molecule-based materials, organic thin films and other soft materials that can exhibit magnetoelectric properties
Spin-electric coupling in single molecule magnets
Coupling of spin crossovers and spin state ordering to electric and strain properties of materials
Magnetoelectric domains and domain walls
Magnetoelectric coupling at surfaces
Band-filling and bandwidth control in complex oxides (a prerequisite to harnessing charge/orbital order, magnetic transitions and metal insulator transitions)
Other novel theoretical and experimental routes to multifunctional cross coupling of magnetic, electric and strain properties.

Jan Musfeldt, (U. Tennessee), musfeldt@utk.edu; Turan Birol, (U. Minnesota) tbirol@umn.edu; Mark Pederson, (U. Texas El Paso) mrpederson@utep.edu.

08.01.04
Organometal halide perovskites: photovoltaics and beyond (DMP, FIAP)Organometallic halide perovskites have recently caused a surge of interest in their optoelectronic properties and applications due to their remarkable performance as semiconductor light absorbers in solar cells. As a new class of semiconductors, these materials are interesting not only because of the hybrid organic-inorganic structure, but also for their superior properties such as high defect tolerance, strong optical absorption, low recombination rate, ambipolar charge transport, and tunable physical properties. Rapid progress has been made in the demonstration of photoelectronic perovskite devices for photovoltaics, light emission, lasing and photodetection. Possible structural asymmetry, due to lattice distortion by organic cations, gives rise to ferroelectricity and large Rashba spin-orbit coupling in the hybrid perovskites, which provides more functionality to devices with electric field control and/or utilization of spin. However, the underlying physics of many unusual properties remains elusive, such as the hysteretic current-voltage relationships, low recombination rate, long spin lifetime and ferroelectric behavior. The practical use of these hybrid perovskite calls for more in-depth understanding of their fundamental properties and versatile strategies to tune and optimize the materials properties. In this Focus Topic we expect contributions on broadly-defined experimental and modeling studies of the optical, electronic, structural and defect properties of the organometallic halide perovskites. Advancements in materials engineering and the development of practical applications are also encouraged.

Hemamala Karunadasa (Stanford) hemamala@stanford.edu; Naomi Ginsberg (UC Berkeley) nsginsberg@berkeley.edu

08.01.05
Machine Learning and Data in Polymer Physics (DPOLY, DBIO, DCOMP, GDS, FIAP) [same as 01.01.01, 04.01.19, 16.01.17, 23.01.11]
08.01.06
Organic Electronics (DPOLY, FIAP, DMP) [same as 01.01.02]
08.01.07
Optical Spectroscopic Measurements of 2D Materials (FIAP, DMP, GIMS) [same as 19.01.06]
08.02.00
FIAP Standard Sorting Categories
08.03.00
Materials: synthesis, growth, processing, and defects (bulk and films)
08.04.00
Thermodynamic and transport properties (not QHE, FQHE)
08.05.00
Atomic structure, lattice properties and phase transitions
08.06.00
Electronic structure: theory and spectra
08.07.00
Electronic structure: thermodynamic and optical properties
08.08.00
Mechanical and dynamical properties
08.09.00
Electricity-to-light conversion: solid state lighting
08.10.00
Organic semiconductors, flexible electronics
08.11.00
Hybrid semiconductor/magnetic structures
08.12.00
Semiconductor materials for beyond CMOS electronics
08.13.00
Ballistic transport in semiconductor devices

Superconductivity (DCMP)

09.00.00
DCMP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
09.01.00
DMP Focus Sessions
09.01.01
Fe-based Superconductors (DMP, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.31]More than a decade after their discovery, Fe-based superconductors (FeSCs) continue to fascinate the materials and condensed matter physics communities, not only due to their potential to lead to higher superconducting transition temperatures, but also as a platform to investigate correlated quantum matter. Considerable synthesis, experimental, and theoretical progress has been made in elucidating the defining properties of these materials, including the role of electron-electron interactions in shaping their normal state properties; the intertwining between different ordered states involving spin, orbital, charge, and lattice degrees of freedom; the relevance of nematicity, magnetism, and quantum criticality to the pairing interaction; and the unique effects associated with the multi-orbital nature of these systems. At the same time, there is progress in understanding the unifying principles that may optimize the superconductivity of the FeSCs and connect them with other unconventional superconductors such as cuprates, heavy fermions and organic charge-transfer salts. More recently, FeSCs have become promising materials to explore topological phenomena both inside and outside the superconducting phase. In addition to advancing our fundamental understanding of superconductivity and correlated electron systems, the unique material parameters of FeSCs (relatively high Tc, low anisotropy, high critical fields) offer new approaches to the design of applications such as superconducting wires, magnets and thin-film devices. This focus topic will cover the pertinent recent developments in the materials growth, experimental measurements, and theoretical approaches, and survey the potential for discovering new applications and new superconducting systems with still higher transition temperatures.

Rafael Fernandes (University of Minnesota) rfernand@umn.edu; Donghui Lu (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource) dhlu@slac.stanford.edu; Ming Yi (Rice University) mingyi@rice.edu

09.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
09.03.00
Materials: Growth, Structure, and Properties
09.04.00
Theories and Models of the Superconducting State
09.05.00
Thermodynamic and Mechanical Properties and Phase Diagrams
09.06.00
Transport Properties
09.07.00
Electronic Structure of Superconductors (photoemission, etc.)
09.08.00
Magnetic Field Effects (Vortex Related Phenomena)
09.09.00
Spin Properties (NMR, NQR, neutron scattering, etc.)
09.10.00
Response to Electromagnetic Fields (optical and Raman spectroscopy, surface impedance, etc.)
09.11.00
Tunneling Phenomena (single particle tunneling and STM)
09.12.00
Josephson Effects
09.13.00
Proximity Effects
09.14.00
Fluctuation Phenomena (noise, nonequilibrium effects, localization effects, etc.)
09.15.00
Competing phases and superconductivity
09.16.00
Mesoscopic and Nanometer Scale Phenomena
09.17.00
Other Superconductors (MgB2, complex compounds, organics, etc.)
09.18.00
One and two dimensional superconductivity

Magnetism (GMAG)

10.00.00
GMAG Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
10.01.00
GMAG Focus Sessions
10.01.01
Magnetic Nanostructures: Materials and phenomena (GMAG, DMP)Reduced dimensionality and confinement lead to magnetic states and spin behaviors that are markedly different from those observed in bulk materials. This Focus Topic explores advances in magnetic nanostructures, the novel properties that arise in magnetic materials at the nanoscale, and the advanced characterization tools required for understanding these properties. Magnetic nanostructures of interest include thin films, multilayers, graded layer structures, superlattices, nanoparticles, nanowires, nanorings, nanotubes, 3D nanostructures, nanocomposite materials, hybrid nanostructures, magnetic point contacts, and self-assembled, as well as patterned, magnetic arrays. Sessions will include talks on the methods used to synthesize such nanostructures, the variety of materials used, and the latest original theoretical, experimental, and technological advances. Synthesis and characterization techniques that demonstrate nano- or atomic-scale control of properties will be featured, such as: novel deposition and lithography methods; electron microscopy (Lorentz and holographic imaging, in-situ techniques, time / frequency resolution); advances in synchrotron methods and neutron scattering techniques; and novel near field imaging techniques including NV center-based imaging. Phenomena and properties of interest include magnetization reversal and dynamics (including ultrafast and THz dynamics), topology in nanoscale spin textures, magnonics, magnetic interactions including anti-symmetric and antiferromagnetic exchange, magnetic quantum confinement, spin tunneling and spin crossover, proximity and structural disorder effects, strain effects, and thermal and quantum fluctuations.

Vincent Sokalski, Carnegie Mellon University, sokalski@cmu.edu; Dario Arena, University of South Florida, darena@usf.edu; Andreas Berger, CIC nanoGUNE, a.berger@nanogune.eu

10.01.02
Emergent Properties of Bulk Complex Oxides (GMAG, DMP, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.34]The emergence of novel states of matter, arising from the intricate coupling of electronic and lattice degrees of freedom, is a unique feature in strongly correlated electron systems. This Focus Topic explores the nature of such ordered states observed in bulk compounds of these complex metal oxides; it will provide a forum for discussion of recent developments in theory, simulation, synthesis, and characterization, with the aim of covering basic aspects and identifying future key directions in bulk oxides. Of special interest are the ways in which the spin, lattice, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom cooperate, compete, and/or reconstruct in complex oxides to produce novel phenomena as well as novel magnetic states, often with exotic topological properties that can arise from the interplay of spin-orbit coupling and Coulomb interactions. Associated with this complexity is a tendency for new forms of order, such as the formation of stripes, ferroic states, exotic spin-liquid phases with topological order and fractionalized excitations, spin-orbit entangled states or phase separation. An additional focus of this session is on how competing interactions result in spatial correlations over multiple length scales, giving rise to enhanced electronic and magnetic susceptibilities and responses to external stimuli.

Mohit Randeria, Ohio State University, randeria@mps.ohio-state.edu; Gang Cao, University of Colorado at Boulder, Gang.Cao@Colorado.edu; Stephan Rosenkranz, Argonne National Laboratory, srosenkranz@anl.gov

10.01.03
Magnetic Oxide Thin Films and Heterostructures (GMAG, DMP, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.35]The intricate interactions and competitions among charge, spin, orbital, and structural degrees of freedom make magnetism in complex oxides an intriguing field of research. Specifically, in thin films and heterostructures, these competitions might lead to a wide variety of interfacial phenomena such as charge transfer, orbital reconstruction, quantum confinement, proximity effects, and modifications to local atomic structure. Novel magnetic interactions and ground states thus can emerge, generating exciting new prospects both for the discovery of fundamental physics and the development of technological applications. This Focus Topic is dedicated to progress in the knowledge, methodologies, and tools required to advance the field of magnetism in oxide thin films, heterostructures, superlattices, and nanostructures. Synthesis, characterization, theory, and novel device physics are emphasized. Specific areas of interest include, but are not limited to, growth of oxide thin films and heterostructures, magnetic behavior in strongly correlated systems, control of their magnetic properties and ordering, magnetotransport, dilute magnetism, magnetoelectric phenomena, coupling of atomic and magnetic structures, strong spin-orbit coupling effects, topological surface states or spin-polarized states, charge-to-spin and spin-to-charge conversion, and recent developments in theoretical prediction and materials-by-design approaches. Advances in experimental techniques to probe and image magnetic order and transitions in complex oxide thin films (including scanning probes, optical, electron, neutron, and synchrotron-based techniques) are also emphasized. Note that overlap exists with other DMP and GMAG focus topic sessions. As a rule of thumb, if magnetism plays a key role in the investigation, then the talk is appropriate for this Focus Topic.

Satoru Emori, Virginia Tech, semori@vt.edu; A. Ariando, National University of Singapore, ariando@nus.edu.sg; Divine Kumah, North Carolina State University, dpkumah@ncsu.edu

10.01.04
Chiral Spin Textures and Dynamics, Including Skyrmions (GMAG, DMP)Materials that display non-collinear or other complex magnetic textures are known to develop novel charge, heat, or spin transport characteristics. These properties are intrinsically related to the topology of the global magnetic spin arrangement. Understanding and mastering these phenomena may help reveal hidden order/dynamics in novel materials and offer exciting opportunities towards next-generation device applications. At large, the study of these topological spin textures is also relevant to fields as diverse as spintronics, nanomagnetism, quantum computing, strong correlation, and thermal management. This Focus Topic will address the most relevant and recent developments, from materials to physical modeling and device technology, in the field of chiral magnetism. Specific areas include, but are not limited to: magnetic skyrmions (and more complex solitons) in various material architectures (bulk/thin-films/2D), chiral magnetization dynamics, spin-orbit torques, the physics and control of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), DMI-induced non-reciprocity in spin waves, interfacial magnetism, topological transport phenomena, emergent electrodynamics, and novel devices based on non-trivial topological spin textures and dynamics. Advanced techniques to study chiral magnetism, such as spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy, magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy, Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy, spin-polarized low energy electron microscopy, NV center microscopy, Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, neutron scattering, and synchrotron-based techniques will also be included. The aim of this Focused Topic is not only to promote fundamental understanding of chiral magnetism but also facilitate innovative technology.

Jiadong Zang, University of New Hampshire, jiadong.zang@unh.edu; Lisa DeBeer-Schmitt, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, debeerschmlm@ornl.gov; Jacob Gayles, Max-Planck Institute/University of South Florida, gayles@usf.edu

10.01.05
Spin Transport and Magnetization Dynamics in Metals-Based Systems (GMAG, DMP, FIAP) [same as 22.01.04]The generation, manipulation, and detection of spin currents in metals and magnetic heterostructures are of great interest for fundamental science and applications. Understanding of fundamental spin-dependent transport physics, accompanied by progress in materials and nanoscale engineering, has already had a dramatic impact on technology. Discoveries like giant and tunneling magnetoresistance have moved to applications, and uses of more recent discoveries, including magneto-thermal effects, spin-transfer torque, spin-Hall effects, and chiral domain walls, are imminent. This Focus Topic aims to capture experimental and theoretical developments in spin transport and magnetization dynamics in mostly metal-based systems, such as ultra-thin films, heterostructures, lateral nanostructures, perpendicular nanopillars, and tunnel junctions. In particular, contributions describing new results in the following areas are solicited: (i) Interplay between spin currents and magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures; spin-transfer, spin-pumping and related phenomena, including current-induced magnetization dynamics in heterostructures and domain wall motion in magnetic wires; (ii) Theoretical predictions and/or experimental discovery of half-metallic band structures, both in bulk solids and at the surfaces of thin films; Spin transport and magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures (e.g., TMR, CPP-GMR and lateral spin valve structures) based on half-metallic materials; (iii) Manifestations of spin-orbit interactions including, but not limited to field-like and damping-like torques on magnetic films and nanostructures, the spin-Hall, inverse spin-Hall, and anomalous Hall effects; microscopic mechanisms of magnetization damping; (iv) Electric field control of magnetic properties (e.g., anisotropy, phase transitions, etc.), including but not limited to hybrid metal/oxide structures, piezoelectric layers coupled to ferromagnetic films, and electrolyte/ferromagnetic systems; (v) Ultrafast magnetization response to (and reversal by) intense laser pulses; magnetization dynamics at elevated temperatures, and thermally-assisted magnetization reversal; (vi) Thermoelectric spin phenomena such as giant magneto-thermopower and Peltier effects, spin-Seebeck effects, spin and anomalous Nernst and Ettingshausen effects (spin caloritronics); (vii) Thermal gradient and/or RF-driven magnonic magnetization dynamics in nanostructures, including spin wave excitation, propagation, and detection; Interactions between electronic spin current and magnon propagations in thin-film and device structures; and (viii) General considerations of spin angular momentum, energy, and entropy flow, conservation laws, and Onsager reciprocity relations.

Hyunsoo Yang, National University of Singapore, eleyang@nus.edu.sg; Ran Cheng, University of California Riverside, rancheng@ucr.edu; Benedetta Flebus, University of Texas at Austin/Boston College, benedetta.flebus@gmail.com

10.01.06
Spin-Dependent Phenomena in Semiconductors, Including 2D Materials and Topological Systems (GMAG, DMP, FIAP, DCOMP) [same as 08.01.01, 16.01.36]The field of spin-dependent phenomena in semiconductors addresses a wide range of new effects, materials systems [e.g., III-V and II-VI heterostructures, group-IV materials including Si, Ge, SiC, diamond and graphene, transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and other 2D semiconductors, and oxide semiconductors] and new structures (e.g., quantum dots and nanocrystals, nanowires and carbon nanotubes, hybrid ferromagnetic/semiconductor structures, and van der Waals heterojunctions). This Focus Topic solicits contributions aimed at understanding spin-dependent processes in magnetic and non-magnetic structures incorporating semiconducting materials. Topics include: (i) electrical and optical spin injection and detection, spin pumping, spin Hall effects, spin-dependent topological effects, spin filtering, spin dynamics and scattering; (ii) growth and electrical, optical and magnetic properties of magnetic semiconductors, nanocomposites, and hybrid ferromagnet-semiconductor structures, including quantum dots, and nanowires; (iii) spin and valley dynamics in bulk (e.g. Si, Ge) and monolayer semiconductors (e.g. TMDs); (iv) spin-dependent electronic and thermal transport effects, and dynamical effects in semiconductors with or without spin-orbit interactions, including proximity effects in heterostructures; (v) manipulation, detection, and entanglement of electronic and nuclear spins in quantum systems, including dots, impurities and point defects (e.g., NV centers in diamond); (vi) magneto-resistance, magneto-electroluminescence, and resonance-driven spin pumping in organic semiconductors; (vii) spin-dependent devices and device proposals involving semiconductors; and (viii) spin-dependent properties (e.g. quantum anomalous Hall effects) in topological insulators and topological insulator/ferromagnet hybrid structures.

Michael Flatté, University of Iowa, michael-flatte@uiowa.edu; Sergio Valenzuela, Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), sov@icrea.cat; Roland Kawakami, The Ohio State University; kawakami.15@osu.edu

10.01.07
Frustrated Magnetism (GMAG, DMP)Simple antiferromagnets on bipartite lattices have well-understood ground states, elementary excitations, thermodynamic phases and phase transitions. At the forefront of current research are frustrated magnets where competing interactions suppress magnetic order and may lead to qualitatively new behavior. Frustrated magnets may realize novel quantum-disordered ground states with fractionalized excitations akin to those found in one-dimensional antiferromagnets, but with a number of novel features. This Focus Topic solicits abstracts for presentations that explore both theoretical and experimental aspects of the field. The themes to be represented are united by magnetic frustration: valence-bond solids, spin nematics, topological magnons, and other exotic ordered states; spin ices, quantum spin liquids, order-from-disorder; the interplay of spin, lattice, and orbital degrees of freedom; and design, synthesis and modeling of new materials with magnetic frustration. Also of interest are the effects of strongly fluctuating spins on properties beyond magnetism, including charge, spin, and energy transport, as well as ferroelectricity.

Oleg Tchernyshyov, Johns Hopkins University, olegt@jhu.edu; Sara Haravifard, Duke University, sara.haravifard@duke.edu; Hae-Young Kee, University Toronto, hykee@physics.utoronto.ca

10.01.08
Low-Dimensional and Molecular Magnetism (GMAG, DMP)The possibility of reduction to zero-dimensionality allows exploration of novel size and quantum effects in magnetic systems. While single spins can be isolated in semiconducting devices or by scanning probe techniques, the molecular approach introduces synthetic flexibility, providing the possibility of engineering the magnetic quantum response of a spin system. The development and study of molecular and low-dimensional magnetic systems continue to provide a fertile testing ground to explore complex magnetic behavior and new challenges for the development of experimental techniques and theoretical models. New frontiers are also represented by the possibility of combining low-dimensional magnetic systems in hybrid architectures and to study the interplay between spins and functional nanostructures. This Focus Topic solicits abstracts that explore inorganic and organic molecule-based, as well as solid state, systems, and both theoretical and experimental aspects of the field. Topics of interest include: magnetism in zero, one, and two dimensions (e.g., quantum dots, single-molecule magnets, spin chains, interfaces between molecular spins and functional surfaces), spin-orbit and super-exchange couplings, quantum critical low-dimensional spin systems, topological excitations, quantum tunneling of magnetization, coherent spin dynamics and quantum correlation (e.g. entanglement), and novel field-induced behavior.

Selvan Demir, Michigan State University, sdemir@chemistry.msu.edu; Wei Tian, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, tianwn@ornl.gov; Kemp Plumb, Brown University, kemp_plumb@brown.edu

10.01.09
Magnetic Topological Materials (DMP, GMAG) [Same as 07.01.04]
10.01.10
Magnetism in Biomedicine (GMED, GMAG, DBIO) [Same as 25.01.02, 04.01.34]
10.01.11
Devices from 2D Materials: Function, Fabrication and Characterization (DMP, GMAG) [Same as 12.01.03]
10.02.00
GMAG Standard Sorting Categories
10.03.00
Cooperative Phenomena (incl. spin structures, spin waves, phase transitions)
10.04.00
Magnetic Domains and Domain Walls
10.05.00
Low Dimensional Magnetism (including Molecules and Surfaces)
10.06.00
Correlated Electron Magnetism (GMAG, DCMP) [same as 11.08.00]
10.07.00
Spin-Dependent Transport
10.08.00
Magnetization and Spin Dynamics
10.09.00
Magnetic Anisotropy: Hard and Soft Materials
10.10.00
Disordered Magnetic Materials
10.11.00
Artificially Structured or Self-Assembled Magnetic Materials (including Multilayers, Patterned Films, and Nanoparticles)
10.12.00
Magnetic Devices and Applications (GMAG, FIAP) [same as 22.07.00]
10.13.00
Magnetic Characterization and Imaging

Strongly Correlated Systems, Including Quantum Fluids and Solids (DCMP)

11.00.00
DCMP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
11.01.00
DMP Focus Sessions
11.01.01
5d/4d transition metal systems (DMP)Materials with 5d and 4d orbitals occupy a unique niche due to the competition between the crystal-field, spin-orbit coupling and Coulomb repulsion energy scales, as well as exchange interactions. These materials pose a challenge for observing and calculating behavior in the strongly spin-orbit coupled regime due to competing spin, charge and lattice degrees of freedom. As a consequence of the intricate interplay between various interactions, 5d and 4d materials exhibit intriguing properties that have been observed in experiment and theory, including unexpected insulating behavior, topological spin liquids and unconventional superconductivity.
This focus topic covers experimental and theoretical work on compounds containing 5d/4d elements, e.g. iridium, osmium, rhodium or ruthenium and others. These materials can be found for a variety of two- and three-dimensional lattices with varying degree of frustration and correlations. Emergent phases include magnetism, topological behavior, spin liquids, superconductivity and metal-to-insulator transitions. The topic is not limited to oxides.

Bing Lv, UT-Dallas (blv@utdallas.edu); Shalinee Chikara (Florida State University/National High Magnetic Field Lab) schikara@magnet.fsu.edu; Haidong Zhou (University of Tennessee) hzhou10@utk.edu

11.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
11.03.00
Metal-Insulator Phase Transitions
11.04.00
Other Correlated Electron Phase Transitions
11.05.00
Heavy Fermions (including heavy fermion superconductivity)
11.06.00
Non-Fermi Liquids
11.07.00
Organic Conductors and CDW Materials
11.08.00
Correlated Electron Magnetism (DCMP, GMAG) [same as 10.06.00]
11.09.00
Low Temperature Properties of Helium-3 and/or Helium-4
11.10.00
Multi-polar Kondo systems
11.11.00
Normal state properties of unconventional superconductors
11.12.00
Strong electronic correlations in topological materials
11.13.00
Other quantum fluids and solids
11.14.00
Quantum phase transitions
11.15.00
Dynamics of quenched and driven quantum systems

Complex Structured Materials, Including Graphene (DCMP)

12.00.00
DCMP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
12.01.00
DMP Focus Sessions
12.01.01
2D Materials: Synthesis, Defects, Structure and Properties (DMP)The interest in two dimensional (2D) materials is rapidly spreading across all scientific and engineering disciplines due to their exceptional chemical, mechanical, magnetic, optical and electrical properties, which provide not only a platform to investigate fundamental physical phenomena but also promise solutions to the most relevant technological challenges. 2D materials find their immediate applications in field effect transistors, gas sensors, bio-detectors, mechanical resonators, optical modulators and energy harvesting devices with superior performances that have already been demonstrated in prototype devices. Furthermore, recent progress has also shown that heterostructuring, doping, intercalation and phase engineering in these 2D materials will enable unprecedented structures and functionalities with new opportunities and great potentials. However, the true impact will only be made if the initial breakthroughs are transformed into commercial technologies. A major challenge towards the commercialization of 2D materials is the scalable and controllable production of high- quality layers in a cost-effective way. So far, the best quality samples of 2D materials have been obtained through micromechanical exfoliation of naturally occurring single crystals. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most widely used bottom-up technique to grow large area 2D-materials. Several top-down approaches have also been adopted based on bulk liquid phase chemical and electrochemical exfoliation. Each type of method possesses its unique strength to enable materials for specific research or application needs, whereas on the other hand has its own challenge to be addressed.
This focus topic will cover:
Experimental, theoretical, and computational studies illuminating various aspects of the CVD growth process including, e. g., layer number and stacking geometry control, the formation of topological and structural defects, grain size and grain boundary control, and the effect of substrate chemistry, crystallography and strain mMethods of doping, epitaxy, intercalation or phase engineering
Templated or bottom-up growth or top-down synthesis of nanostructures and integration with other materials
Characterization and modeling of the structural, mechanical, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of the synthesized 2D materials
Design and discovery of van der Waals magnets toward room temperature devices.

Liuyan Zhao (U. Michigan) lyzhao@umich.edu; Robert Hovden (U. Michigan) hovden@umich.edu

12.01.02
2D Materials: Semiconductors (DMP, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.32]Research exploring 2D semiconductors is rapidly expanding to include a wide variety of layered materials and their heterostructures with diverse properties such as strong many-body interactions, strong spin-orbit coupling effects, spin-, polarization-, and valley-dependent physics, and topological physics. This Focus Topic will cover experimental and theoretical/computational work related to 2D semiconductors and their heterostructures, including large bandgap materials such as the chalcogenides (e.g. MoS2, WSe2, GaSe, and ReSe2), phosphorene and h-BN, small bandgap materials with possible topological properties (such as silicene, germanene, stanine, and WTe2), magnetic semiconductors (e.g. CrGeTe3, CrI3, and Mn:MoS2), ferroelectric semiconductors (e.g., In2Se3 and CuInP2S6), and other emerging new semiconductors. We encourage abstracts discussing results on monolayers, few-layers, and heterostructures, including twisted bilayers and their nanostructures. Topics of interest include quantum transport, mobility engineering, the understanding and engineering of the dielectric environment and defects on optical, electronic and many-body phenomena, piezoelectric and ferroelectric effects, spin-, polarization-, and valley-dependent phenomena, exciton physics including Moire excitons, properties of domain walls, as well as magnetic, multiferroic, thermal and mechanical properties of 2D semiconductors. Processing and measurement techniques developed to probe van der Waals semiconductors are also welcome.

Nicholas Borys (Montana State University) nicholas.borys@montana.edu; Xia Hong (University of Nebraska-Lincoln) xia.hong@unl.edu; Patrick Vora (George Mason University) pvora@gmu.edu

12.01.03
Devices from 2D Materials: Function, Fabrication and Characterization (DMP, GMAG) [same as 10.01.11]With the rapid progress in the research on 2D materials, including graphene and other layered material systems, a wide variety of properties and functionalities have emerged that have broad scientific and technological significance. The rational design of devices consisting of 2D materials calls for improved understanding of their intrinsic and extrinsic properties that are critical to the device functionality, as well as their integration with other device components. The development of these 2D materials based devices also requires solutions to problems associated with material functionalization, structural fabrication, and device characterization. This Focus Topic will cover experimental and theoretical/computational work related to devices based on the growing array of 2D materials that exhibit a wide variety of behaviors – such as metallic, semiconducting, insulating, magnetic, ferroelectric, superconducting, and various strongly correlated electronic phenomena. These 2D materials include (but are not limited to) graphene, transition-metal chalcogenides (e.g., MoS2, WSe2, NbSe2, TaS2, FeSe etc.), silicene, germanane, stanene, phosphorene, magnets (e.g. CrI3, Fe3GeTe2, Cr2Ge2Te6, etc.), ferroelectrics (e.g. SnTe, In2Se3, etc.), topological insulators (e.g., Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3, etc.), layered oxides (e.g., BSCCO), and large band gap materials such as h-BN. Alternative non-2D materials that form clean van der Waals interfaces with 2D materials, such as CaF2, may be also covered in this Focus Topic.
We invite contributions on topics including: (i) the functionalization, fabrication, measurements, and modeling of devices based on the unique properties of 2D materials in the single- or multi-layered forms as well as their heterostructures; (ii) alternative non-2D materials that form van der Waals interfaces with 2D materials; (iii) proof-of-principle studies focusing on the electronic, magnetic, dielectric, optical, mechanical, thermal, and chemical behaviors of 2D materials relevant for device applications; (iv) performance statistics, device-to-device variability and yield of 2D materials based electronic devices; and (v) interfacial, environmental, and system-based properties and behaviors inherent to the application of 2D materials in future devices.

Deji Akinwande (UT Austin) deji@ece.utexas.edu; Henri Happy (U. Lille) henri.happy@univ-lille.fr; Mario Lanza (Suzhou U) mlanza@suda.edu.cn

12.01.04
2D Materials: Metals, Superconductors, and Correlated Materials (DMP)In the last few years, there has been an explosion of activities in the field of two-dimensional materials beyond graphene. Much of the initial effort focused on the rich optoelectronic properties of semiconducting compounds like the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and black phosphorus. Some of the TMDs display an insulator-to-metal transition upon gating which seems to be driven by electronic correlations. Others are metallic (or semi-metallic) over the entire temperature range while presenting gapped electronic ground states, such as superconductivity or charge-density waves. Semi-metallic WTe2 and orthorhombic MoTe2 (or ZrTe5) are claimed to possess unique topological features in their electronic band structures apparently leading to anomalous transport properties and perhaps also to an unconventional superconducting state. Both superconducting and charge density wave properties seem to acquire new twist in these systems: in monolayer NbSe2 superconductivity was shown to survive up to extremely high magnetic fields when field is applied along its planar direction. Similarly, electronic correlations are likely to be important for the high superconducting transition temperature observed in monolayer FeSe. On the other hand, charge density wave exhibits chiral electronic order was found recently in TiSe2 and this could provide significant impetus for studies of optoelectronic properties of TMDs. Ground states with different coexisting correlated electronic phases have been identified in several of these materials, which opens new opportunities for probing interactions between different ordered states with high resolution temporal and spatial probes.
This focus topic will concentrate on two-dimensional materials displaying gate or strain induced phase-transitions or ground states with either non-trivial topologies or broken-symmetries for which new and relevant physical phenomena are likely to emerge.

Goran Karapetrov (Drexel Univ.) gk327@drexel.edu; Kenneth Burch (Boston College) ks.burch@bc.edu; Katja Nowack (Cornell Univ.) katja.nowack@cornell.edu

12.01.05
Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (DCOMP, DMP) [same as 16.01.10]The development of predictive computational simulation for accelerating the discovery and rational design of functional materials is a challenge of great contemporary interest. Advances in algorithms and predictive power of computational techniques are playing a fundamental role in the discovery of novel functional materials, with successful examples in catalysis, batteries, and photoelectrochemistry. High-throughput computation and materials databases have recently enabled rapid screening of both molecules and solid-state compounds with multiple properties and functionalities. This focus topic will cover research efforts to accelerate materials discovery and/or development by building the fundamental knowledge base and applying novel data driven approaches to design materials with specific and targeted functional properties from first principles. Abstracts are solicited in the areas of interest that include computational materials design and discovery; development of accessible and sustainable data infrastructure; development of new data analytic tools and statistical algorithms; advanced simulations of material properties in conjunction with new device functionality; data uncertainty quantification; advances in predictive modeling that leverage machine learning and data mining; algorithms for global structure and property optimizations; and computational modeling of materials synthesis. The technical applications include but are not limited to electronic and optoelectronic materials, magnetic materials and spintronics, energy conversion and storage materials (thermoelectrics, batteries, fuel cells, photocatalysts, photovoltaics, ferroelectrics), metallic alloys, and two-dimensional materials. Contributions that feature strong connection to experiments are of special interest.

Sinead M. Griffin (LBNL) : sgriffin@lbl.gov; Geoffroy Hautier, U-Louvain (Dartmouth College) geoffroy.hautier@dartmouth.edu

12.02.00.0
Standard Sorting Categories
12.03.00
Nanostructures (non-carbon) (Wires, Dots, Nanotubes etc): Electronic Phenomena
12.04.00
Nanostructures (non-carbon) (Wires, Dots, Nanotubes etc): Optical and non- Electronic Phenomena
12.05.00
Carbon Nanostructures (non-graphene)
12.06.00
2D Materials (non-carbon): Structure and Electronic Phenomena
12.07.00
2D materials (non-carbon): Optical Phenomena
12.08.00
Graphene (non-Moire) : Electronic Phenomena
12.09.00
Graphene (non-Moire): Optical Phenomena
12.10.00
2D Materials: Moire systems: Magic angle Twisted graphene
12.11.00
2D Materials: Moire systems: Twisted graphene beyond magic angle
12.12.00
2D Materials: Moire systems: Beyond graphene
12.13.00
Flat bands beyond Moire system

Superlattices, and Other Artificially Structured Materials (DCMP)

13.00.00
DCMP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
13.01.00
DMP Focus Sessions
13.01.01
Nanostructures and Metamaterials (DMP)Recent experimental, theoretical and computational advances have enabled the design and realization of micro-/nano-structured materials with novel, complex and often unusual electromagnetic properties unattainable from natural materials. Such nanostructures and metamaterials provide unique opportunities to manipulate electromagnetic radiation over a broad range of frequencies, from ultraviolet and visible to terahertz and microwave. These concepts have also been extended to enable acoustic/mechanical metamaterials and metasurfaces. The transition from three-dimensional nanostructures and metamaterials to planar two-dimensional metasurfaces further facilitates structure fabrication, material integration, novel functionality, and system miniaturization, thereby finding a wide range of potential applications. This focus topic will highlight recent progress in the physical understanding, design, fabrication, and applications of these artificial materials. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: nanophotonics, plasmonics, near-field and quantum optics, optofluidics, energy harvesting, and the emerging interface of condensed matter and materials physics with biological, chemical and neural sciences.

Houtong Chen (Los Alamos National Lab) chenht@lanl.gov; Amit Agrawal (NIST) amit.agrawal@nist.gov; Wenshan Cai (Georgia Tech) wcai@gatech.edu

13.01.02
Electron, Exciton, and Phonon Transport in Nanostructures (DMP)Understanding and controlling how heat, charge, and energy flow at the nanoscale is critical for realizing the potential of nanomaterials in next generation device technologies. Of particular challenge, and opportunity, is understanding how elementary excitations such as phonons, electrons, holes, excitons, and plasmons interact with each other and are influenced by interfaces, confinement, and quantum effects in nanostructures. This is particularly true for heterogeneous nanoscale materials and interfaces with varying degrees of electronic and phononic couplings, and distinct thermal and electrical impedances. Structural components used in hybrid nanostructures can be made of semiconductors, metals, molecules, liquids, etc.
Contributions are solicited in areas that reflect recent advances in experimental measurement, theory, and modeling of transport mechanisms in nanoscale materials and interfaces. Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
Electron-phonon coupling and heat generation by hot charge carriers
Dynamics of energy and charge flow in nanostructured hybrid materials
Ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers, excitons, and phonons in nanostructures and across nanoscale interfaces
Charge, heat, and exciton transport through metal-semiconductor interfaces, inorganic-organic interfaces, and molecular junctions
Correlating nanoscale interface structure & chemistry with charge, heat, and exciton transport
Non-equilibrium heat transport and phonon-bottlenecks effects
Influence of dimensionality, nanostructuring, and surface states on charge, heat, and exciton transport
Energy transfer in hybrid nanomaterials including dots, wires, plates, polymers, etc
Excitonic nanomaterials with light-harvesting and lighting properties utilizing both solid-state and molecular components
Plasmonic nano- and meta-structures for light harvesting and concentration
Near-field heat transfer and energy conversion in nanogaps and nanodevices
Hybrid structures with interacting exciton and plasmon resonances
Hybrid nanomaterials for photo-catalytic applications utilizing excitons and plasmons

C. Tom Harris (Sandia National Lab) ctharri@sandia.gov; Bill Rice (University of Wyoming) wrice2@uwyo.edu; Tzu-Ming Lu (Sandia National Labs) tlu@sandia.gov

13.01.03
Complex Oxide Interfaces and Heterostructures (DMP)Emergent electronic and magnetic states at complex oxide interfaces raise exciting prospects for new fundamental physics and technological applications. These novel properties arise as a result of interfacial charge transfer, exchange coupling, orbital reconstructions, proximity effects, dimensionality, and mechanical and electric boundary conditions. This Focus Topic is dedicated to progress in the fabrication, methodologies, and knowledge in the field of complex oxide thin films, heterostructures, superlattices, and nanostructures. Synthesis, characterization, theory, and novel device physics are emphasized. Specific areas of interest include, but are not limited to: the growth of novel oxide thin films and heterostructures; the control of magnetic, electronic, ordering, ionic conduction, phase transitions, interfacial superconductivity, multiferroicity, magnetotransport, spin-orbit coupling properties; and developments in theoretical prediction and materials-by-design approaches. Advances in techniques to probe and image electronic, structural, and magnetic states at heterostructure interfaces are also emphasized. Note that overlap exists with other DMP and GMAG focus sessions. As a rule of thumb, if complex oxides and their heterostructures are at the core of the investigation, then the talk is appropriate for this focus topic.

Shyam Dwaraknath (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab) shyamd@lbl.gov ; Darrell G. Schlom (Cornell University) schlom@cornell.edu ; Yuri Suzuki (Stanford University) ysuzuki1@stanford.edu

13.01.04
Materials for Quantum Information Science (DMP, DQI) [same as 17.01.33]Technologies for processing of information are at a cross-road. Until now, advances in information processing have been mainly achieved by miniaturization and integration, such as scaling down transistor-based semiconductor technologies and heterogeneous integration in an architecture, the traditional methodology is rapidly approaching its physical limits. A new class of information processing that explores possibilities beyond classical computing architectures is now underway with particular emphasis on quantum phenomena that complement existing computing architectures. Quantum information processing, revolutionizing ways of generation, transmission, and computation of information, must be physically implemented by appropriate materials. To that end, new materials and physical properties are needed along with close collaborations among physicists, materials scientists, and electrical engineers. This Focus Topic intersects the materials discovery, devices physics, and nanoscale structure communities for quantum information processing (QIP) within the common theme of understanding the underlying physical interactions in materials for quantum information processing. Given the exploratory nature of this field, contributions are solicited broadly among the following topics:
Superconducting materials and devices
Trapped ion systems
Solid-state artificial atoms (quantum dots, quantum wells)
Solid-state quantum defects (point-defects in wide-gap semiconductors, rare-earth ions)
2D materials and defects in 2D materials
Topological materials
Hybrid quantum systems
Magnetic systems including molecular magnets and molecular spin qubits
Optical quantum computing devices
Biological, polymer, or inorganic materials for QIP
First principles theory/simulations of QIP materials.
Other ideas that may be exploratory and less well defined at this time are also encouraged; however, suitable talks for this focus topic should focus on the (quantum) materials and physics germane to QIP.

Joe Heremans (Argonne) heremans@anl.gov; Xuedan Ma (Argonne) xuedan.ma@anl.gov; Jinkyoung Yoo (Los Alamos) jyoo@lanl.gov

13.02.00.0
Standard Sorting Categories
13.03.00
Artificially Structured Materials and Interfaces : Growth, Structure, Properties, and Defec
13.04.00
Superlattices: Electronic and optical Phenomena
13.05.00
Metamaterials: Electronic and optical phenomena
13.06.00
Surfaces and Interfaces in non-oxide heterostructures: electronic and transport phenomena
13.07.00
Other Artificially Structured Materials and Related Phenomena

Surfaces, Interfaces, and Thin Films (DCMP)

14.00.00
DCMP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
14.01.00
DMP Focus Sessions
14.01.01
Surface, Interface, and Thin Film Science of Organic Molecular Solids (DMP)Organic molecular solids are a challenging materials class since numerous “weak” interactions, all of comparable strength, control structures and functional properties. The promise of high-performance optoelectronics, designer sensors, electrode work function control, and bioelectronic devices make the payoff for addressing this challenge high. In these applications surfaces and interface are decisive in their impact on carrier injection and transport, and on structure and morphology control. This Focus Topic will convene to discuss new experimental and theoretical/computational results aimed at the both basic and applied physics underpinning surfaces, interfaces, and thin films of organic solids. Research of interest includes the structure, properties, charge dynamics, and applications of organic adsorbates, monolayer assemblies, thin films, crystals, and nanostructures.

Emily Bittle (NIST) emily.bittle@nist.gov; Daniel Dougherty (NC State Univ) dbdoughe@ncsu.edu

14.02.00
Standard Sorting Categories
14.03.00
Thin Film Growth and Processing
14.04.00
Surfaces, Interfaces and Thin Films: Structure and Morphology
14.05.00
Surfaces, Interfaces and Thin Film Reactions: Kinetics and Dynamics
14.06.00
Surfaces, Interfaces and Thin Films: Electronic and Lattice Properties

Metals and Metallic Alloys (DCMP)

15.00.00
DCMP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
15.01.00
Standard Sorting Categories
15.02.00
Actinide Elements and Compounds
15.03.00
Metal Physics: Structural and Mechanical Properties including Alloys and Superalloys
15.04.00
Metal Physics: Thermodynamics, Transport, Optical Properties, Electronic Structure, etc.

General Theory, Computational Physics (DCOMP)

16.00.00
DCOMP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
16.01.00
DCOMP Focus Sessions
16.01.01
Matter in extreme environments (DCOMP, DMP)
16.01.02
Building the bridge to exascale: applications and opportunities for materials, chemistry, and biology (DCOMP, DBIO, DCP, DPOLY, DMP, DAMOP, DCMP) [same as 04.01.24, 05.01.13, 01.01.48, 06.01.08]
16.01.03
Electrons, phonons, electron-phonon scattering, and phononics (DCOMP, DMP)
16.01.04
First-principles modeling of excited-state phenomena in materials (DCOMP, DCP, DMP) [same as 05.01.14]
16.01.05
Machine learning for quantum matter (DCOMP, GDS, DMP) [same as 23.01.10]
16.01.06
Precision many-body physics (DCOMP, DAMOP, DCMP) [same as 06.01.05]
16.01.07
Understanding glasses and disordered systems through computational models (DCOMP, DSOFT, GSNP, DPOLY) [same as 02.01.70, 03.01.27, 01.01.49]
16.01.08
Computational methods for statistical mechanics: advances and applications (DCOMP, GSNP) [same as 03.01.26]
16.01.09
Real-space methods for the electronic structure problem: new algorithms and applications (DCOMP)
16.01.10
Computational design and discovery of novel materials (DCOMP, DMP) [same as 12.01.05]
16.01.11
Emerging trends in molecular dynamics simulations and machine learning (DCOMP, GDS, DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 23.01.12, 02.01.71, 01.01.50]
16.01.12
Modeling the electrochemical interface and aqueous solutions (DCOMP, DCP) [same as 05.01.15]
16.01.13
Physics and effects on transport of ion-ion correlation in electrolyte materials (DCOMP, DCP, DMP) [same as 05.01.16]
16.01.14
Van der Waals Interactions in molecules, materials, and complex environments (DCOMP)
16.01.15
Heat transport in condensed systems: ballistic, hydrodynamic, diffusive, and quantum (DCOMP)
16.01.16
Big data in physics (GDS, DCOMP, GSNP) [same as 23.01.01, 03.01.43]
16.01.17
Machine learning and data in polymer physics (DPOLY, DBIO, DCOMP, GDS, FIAP) [same as 01.01.01, 04.01.19, 23.01.11, 08.01.05]
16.01.18
Electric Polarization in Polymer Physics (DPOLY, GSNP, DCP, DCOMP) [same as 01.01.03, 03.01.32, 05.01.07]
16.01.19
Charged polymers for neuromorphic applications (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP, DCP) [same as 01.01.32, 02.01.50, 04.01.35, 05.01.18]
16.01.20
Molecular and ion transport in polymers (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP, DCP) [same as 01.01.24, 02.01.47, 04.01.36, 05.01.19]
16.01.21
Topological effects in soft and condensed matter (DPOLY, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP, DCP) [same as 01.01.28, 02.01.49, 04.01.37, 05.01.20]
16.01.22
Machine learning for biomolecular design and simulation (DPOLY, GDS, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP) [same as 01.01.30, 23.01.14, 02.01.43, 04.01.38]
16.01.23
Stochastic thermodynamics of biological and artificial information processing (GSNP, DCOMP) [same as 03.01.16]
16.01.24
Density Functional Theory and Beyond (DCP, DCOMP, DCMP, DPOLY) [same as 05.01.05, 01.01.46]
16.01.25
Electronic-vibrational coupling in light harvesting (DCP, DCOMP, DCMP, DPOLY, DAMOP) [same as 05.01.01, 01.01.44, 06.01.09]
16.01.26
Water Dynamics in Different Environments: Experiment and Theory (DCP, DCOMP, DBIO, GSNP, DSOFT) [same as 05.01.04, 04.01.23, 03.01.28, 02.01.73]
16.01.27
Machine learning in nonlinear physics and mechanics (DSOFT, GSNP, DCOMP) [same as 02.01.06, 03.01.42]
16.01.28
Noisy Intermediate Scale Quantum Computers (DQI, DCOMP) [same as 17.01.16]
16.01.29
Multiferroics, magnetoelectrics, spin-electric coupling, and ferroelectrics (DMP, DCOMP, FIAP) [same as 08.01.03]
16.01.30
Dopants and defects in semiconductors (DMP, DCOMP, FIAP) [same as 08.01.02]
16.01.31
Fe-based superconductors (DMP, DCOMP) [same as 09.01.01]
16.01.32
2D Materials: Semiconductors (DMP, DCOMP) [same as 12.01.02]
16.01.33
Computational Modeling of Materials for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP, DCOMP) [same as 21.01.02, 22.01.06]
16.01.34
Emergent properties of bulk complex oxides (GMAG, DMP, DCOMP) [same as 10.01.02]
16.01.35
Magnetic oxide thin films and heterostructures (GMAG, DMP, DCOMP) [same as 10.01.03]
16.01.36
Spin-Dependent Phenomena in Semiconductors, Including 2D Materials and Topological Systems (GMAG, DMP, FIAP, DCOMP) [same as 10.01.06, 08.01.01]
16.01.37
Deep Learning for Dynamical Systems (GDS, DCOMP) [same as 23.01.02]
16.01.38
Deep Learning for Spectroscopy (GDS, DCOMP) [same as 23.01.03]
16.01.39
AI Materials Design and Discovery( GDS, DCOMP) [same as 23.01.04]
16.01.40
AI and Statistical/Thermal Physics (GDS, GSNP, DCOMP) [same as 23.01.08, 03.01.45]
16.01.41
Visualization Techniques and Systems (GDS, DCOMP) [same as 23.01.09]
16.02.00
DCOMP Standard Sorting Categories
16.03.00
Electronic Structure Methods
16.04.00
Classical Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics Methods
16.05.00
Quantum Many-Body Systems and Methods
16.06.00
Fluid Dynamics and Plasma Physics
16.07.00
Novel Technologies and Algorithms

Quantum Information, Concepts, and Computation (DQI)

17.00.00
DQI Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
17.01.00
DQI Focus Sessions
17.01.01
Advances in Quantum Technologies: Superconducting Qubits (DQI)There is currently a major push towards the realization of fault-tolerant quantum processors as well as exciting research at the quantum-advantage frontier. This focus session will highlight the technological advances towards these goals that have been achieved by one of its leading technologies: superconducting qubits. Talks will address improvements in a number of areas related to this technology. Contemporary superconducting circuits evolved from two fundamental types of qubits: based on electric charge and on magnetic flux. These initial modalities (charge and flux qubits) have been improved and generalized to realize the multiple types of qubits in use today. The transmon is currently the most widely used qubit for gate-based quantum computation, where it has been used to demonstrate high-fidelity logical operations, quantum simulations and digital algorithms. In turn, due to the structure of their Hamiltonians, the persistent-current and rf-SQUID flux qubits are currently the predominant platforms being used for quantum annealing. With the advent of capacitively shunted flux qubits, this modality now also supports high reproducibility, long coherence times, and moderate anharmonicity levels. Combined with the tunability of its Hamiltonian, this qubit offers a potential alternative platform for Hamiltonian emulation, gate-based quantum computing and quantum annealing. Talks in this session will include, but aren't limited to, these relevant topics to superconducting qubits.

Blake Johnson (Rigetti), Jens Koch (Northwestern University), Erik Lucero (Google), David McKay (IBM)

17.01.02
Advances in Quantum Technologies: Semiconductor Qubits (DQI)Qubits realized in semiconductors continue to make major advances in multiple materials. Spins in electrostatically defined quantum dots in both group-III-V and group-IV semiconductors, in optically-controlled self-assembled quantum dots, and bound to impurities, have all witnessed coherent control with increasing fidelity and progress in the mitigation of decoherence. Recent developments include demonstrations of quantum logic in multiple dots, the analysis of robust methods for reducing charge and hyperfine noise effects, improvements in device development and characterization, and hybridization with superconducting resonators. These developments all indicate strong progress for single and multiple coupled qubits across different semiconducting materials and control methods. This focus session is intended to draw together this progress, with interest in device fabrication, demonstrations of coherent manipulation, control and theoretical modeling.

John Nichol (University of Rochester), Seigo Tarucha (RIKEN), Amir Yacoby (Harvard), Lars Schrieber (Forschungszentrum Julich, Aachen)

17.01.03
Advances in Quantum Technologies: Atomic Systems (DQI, DAMOP) [same as 06.01.07]Trapped ions are promising systems for practical quantum computing. The basic requirements for universal QC have all been demonstrated with ions, and quantum algorithms using few-ion-qubit systems have been implemented. This session will cover the basics of trapped ions for quantum computing including digital quantum computers and analog quantum simulators. This will include how to scale trapped ion quantum computers while mitigating decoherence and control errors. The session will cover near-term applications, considerations impacting the design of future systems of trapped ions, and experiments and demonstrations that may further inform these considerations.

Chris Monroe (IonQ), Rainer Blatt (Innsbruck), Jeremy Sage (MIT)

17.01.04
Advances in Quantum Technologies: Topological Quantum Computing (DQI)Topological Stabilization of Memory and Computation: Encoding quantum information topologically is a powerful strategy for achieving fault-tolerant quantum computing platforms. This includes both active approaches, as utilized in topological codes, and passive approaches, achieved by manifesting topological phases of matter. Recent progress in the field has proposed synthesizing these two approaches, uncovered deep relations between them, and advanced novel methods of processing their topologically encoded quantum information. There has also been a steady exploration of new codes/phases and their properties, such as fracton phases, which can realize self-correcting quantum memory. Combined with the accelerating experimental activity on topological phases and multi-qubit systems, this is a ripe time for the study of topological quantum computing.

Jay Deep Sau (University of Maryland), Tudor Stanescu (West Virginia University)

17.01.05
Advances in Quantum Technologies: Hybrid Systems (DQI)Hybrid quantum systems consisting of a combination of distinct elements, such as superconducting and semiconducting, allow for the coupling of diverse quantum degrees of freedom, e.g. the microscopic electronic degrees of freedom (charge or spin), cavity photons in a superconducting microwave resonator or phonons in an optomechanical resonator. Research in this area opens new opportunities to combine previously disconnected quantum systems such as superconducting, charge, spin, phononic and photonic qubits, and study their functionalities for qubit manipulation, quantum information processing, and quantum simulation.

Guido Burkard (Konstanz), Mark Gyure (UCLA), Sophia Economu (Virginia Tech), Andrei Faraon (Caltech)

17.01.06
Superconducting Qubits: Materials, Fabrication, and Coherence (DQI)Superconducting qubits are electronic circuits manufactured using fabrication process involving lithographic patterning, metal deposition, etching, and controlled oxidation of thin two-dimensional films of a superconductor such as aluminum or niobium. They comprise of lithographically defined Josephson tunnel junctions, inductors, capacitors, and interconnects. When cooled to dilution refrigerator temperatures, these circuits behave as quantum mechanical "artificial atoms," exhibiting quantized states of electronic charge, magnetic flux, or junction phase depending on the design parameters of the constituent circuit elements. Their potential for lithographic scalability, compatibility with microwave control, and operability at nanosecond time scales place superconducting qubits among the leading modalities being considered for quantum information science and technology applications. Circuits are fabricated on silicon or sapphire substrates, leveraging techniques and materials compatible with silicon CMOS manufacturing. Over the past decade, the quantum coherence of superconducting qubits has increased more than five orders of magnitude, due primarily to improvements in their design, fabrication, and, importantly, their constituent materials and interfaces. This session will focus on the important role of materials research in their development and provide a vision for the future.

Will Oliver (MIT), Robert McDermott (UW–Madison) , Britton Plourde (Syracuse), Hanhee Paik (IBM), Andrew Houck (Princeton)

17.01.07
Superconducting Qubits: Circuit Theory, Hamiltonian Analysis and Design Tools (DQI)Robust quantum computation requires encoding delicate quantum information into degrees of freedom that are hard for the environment to change. Quantum encodings have been demonstrated in many physical systems by observing and correcting storage errors and accurately computing with faulty operations. The theory of fault-tolerant quantum computing provides a way forward by providing a foundation and collection of techniques for limiting the spread of errors. This session will focus on Circuit Theory, Hamiltonian Analysis and Design Tools for fault-tolerant state preparation and operation.

Jens Koch (Northwestern), Cody Jones (Google), Liang Jiang (Chicago)

17.01.08
Superconductor and Semiconductor Qubits: I/O, wiring/3D integration and cryogenic packaging (DQI)All qubits operated at milli-Kelvin temperatures have common system requirements, which are challenged by the need to scale devices to 10’s and 100’s of qubits in the near future. These challenges include delivering multiple microwave and bias signals to the device, control of the electromagnetic environment at cryogenic temperatures, microwave hygiene, qubit readout with low noise amplification, and 3D on-chip wiring to allow individual qubit control. To address these challenges there has been novel innovation in I/O design, wiring, 3D integration and cryogenic packaging. These topics will be addressed in this session.

Danna Rosenberg (MIT Lincoln Laboratory), Blake Johnson (Harvard), Erik Lucero (Google), David Reilly (Microsoft), Matt Reagor (Rigetti)

17.01.09
Superconducting Qubits: Fluxonium and Novel Superconducting Qubits (DQI)An important pathway towards overcoming coherence limitations of superconducting qubits consists of developing circuits which offer an increased level of protection from noise. Whether based on symmetries or disjoint support of computational states, such protected qubits have the potential to outperform the widely used transmon qubit. The promise of protection comes at a price: protected superconducting circuits are generally more challenging to fabricate than the transmon, and protection can significantly complicate high-fidelity gate operations and readout. This session will highlight the exciting theoretical and experimental progress on designing, modeling, fabricating, and operating superconducting qubits with intrinsic protection, ranging from high-coherence fluxonium over 0-π to entirely new circuit proposals.

Michel Devoret (Yale), Jens Koch (Northwestern), Yu Chen (Google), Chris Wilson (Waterloo), Vlad Manucharyan (Maryland)

17.01.10
Semiconductor Qubits: Spin Qubit Read-out (DQI)Quantum computing relies on the preparation, control and measurement of quantum states. In order to achieve scalable universal quantum computation, the error rate of all these processes needs to be less than 1%, the fault-tolerant threshold for 2-dimensional surface-code architectures. Recently, the quality of single- and two-qubit gates have been characterised by randomised benchmarking. Whilst randomised benchmarking is useful to establish a comparative analysis of the quality of operation of qubit gates, state-preparation and measurement errors will lower the overall fidelity of quantum computer operation and always need to be considered when designing fault-tolerant quantum computers. Recent large-scale proposals for quantum computers in semiconductors utilise single electron, or nuclear, spins as the qubits. The measurement of spins in these semiconductor architectures can be performed using a capacitively- or tunnel-coupled reservoir to the quantum dot/donor. This session focusses on correctly identifying spin qubits in semiconductors and the parameters needed for high fidelity operation.

Fernando Gonzalez-Zalba (Cambridge University), Benjamin D'Anjou (ULM University), Daniel Keith (UNSW Sydney)

17.01.11
Semiconductor Qubits: Multi-qubit control and scalability of spin qubits (DQI)Using the spin-degree of freedom, the coherence properties and the quality of single-qubit operations have now reached the required level and are on par with competing approaches. Two-qubit operations will likely follow suit in the near future. With these basic requirements being met, attention is turning to how to realise increasingly large multi-qubit systems. This session will cover the challenges of scale-up in semiconductor spin qubits including, but not limited to, scalable implementation of single and two qubit gates, qubit reproducibly, automated qubit operation, qubit arrays and connectivity along with multi-qubit control including crosstalk, frequency crowding, power consumption and integration density. This focus session will discuss the challenges of scalability and multi-qubit control.

Mark Eriksson (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Lieven Vandersypen (Delft University of Technology and QuTech and Kavli Institute of Nanoscience), Hendrik Bluhm (RWTH Aachen University)

17.01.12
Semiconductor Qubits: Quantum Computing with Donor Spins (DQI)Donor atoms in silicon form an attractive platform for universal quantum computing due to the seconds long nuclear spin coherence times coupled with exquisite high fidelity (>99.9%) coherent control of electron spin qubits. Analog quantum simulation is also appealing in these systems due to the possibility of fabricating large scale single or few-atom donor arrays. This session focusses on engineering and control of donors in silicon, including control of tunneling, modelling the electronic and spin structure of donor states and the realization of high fidelity single and two qubit gates. Scaling of donor qubits will require a detailed knowledge of various types of qubit coupling mechanisms, atomic level engineering of quantum states, and the noise environment. The session will include advances in the fabrication of donor devices, benchmarking qubits, the formation of donor arrays, tunnel junctions, single electron transistors, cavity coupling and electron spin transport.

Joris Keizer (SQC/UNSW) John Randall (Zyvex Labs), Rick Silver (NIST)

17.01.13
Semiconductor Qubits: Novel spin qubit materials and technologies (DQI)Qubits can be made from any quantum system that has two states, but the challenge is to maintain quantum coherence long enough to allow manipulation of the qubits. Multiple candidates are emerging for spin qubits in the solid state, including quantum dots in germanium, acceptor dopants, rare-earth ions, color centers in diamond and silicon carbide (SiC). This focus session will showcase some of the emerging semiconductor material platforms and differing technologies for these qubits.

David Awschalom (The University of Chicago), Menno Veldhorst (QuTech)

17.01.14
Hybrid/Macroscopic Quantum Systems, Optomechanics, and Interfacing AMO with Solid State/Nano Systems (DAMOP, DQI) [same as 06.01.03]
17.01.15
Multi-mode and 3D Cavity Circuit QED Systems (DQI)Superconducting circuits form a promising platform for quantum computation. Most modern superconducting processors are based on the transmon circuit and rely on nearest-neighbor interactions for gate operations and entanglement. This session will focus on alternative architectures for superconducting quantum information and simulation, involving many harmonic modes of a multimode cavity. This multimode circuit-QED system has the potential to leverage the long coherence times and restricted decoherence channels of superconducting microwave cavities. In particular, multi-mode quantum circuits can allow error-protected subspaces, nonlinear coupling for multi-qubit operations, and additional mechanisms for state readout or control. This session will address all issues of cavity coupling, design, characterisation operation, modes, and control.

Rob Schoelkopf (Yale University), Yvonne Gao (National University of Singapore)

17.01.16
Noisy Intermediate Scale Quantum Computers (DQI, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.28]It is anticipated that in the near-term future, Noisy Intermediate-Scale Quantum (NISQ) technologies will be available to quantum information scientists. This session explores the potential applications of such quantum computers with ~100 noisy qubits, and how they may serve as a stepping-stone toward larger scale, fault-tolerant devices of the future.

John Preskill (Caltech), Mark Ritter (IBM), Ivan Deutsch (University of New Mexico), Hari Krovi (Raytheon)

17.01.17
Quantum Machine Learning (DQI, GDS) [same as 23.01.16]Machine learning has become a household term due to rapid advances in massively parallel processing units and the equally fast expansion in available data. More recently, we have witnessed an increased interest in applying early quantum technologies to machine learning as an addition to the heterogeneous architectures that learning algorithms already exploit. As noise levels remain high in near-term intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) devices and scalability is also limited, the question is whether these technologies can give any kind of advantage that the machine learning community would be interested in. Much research effort has been dedicated to the application of optimization or sampling by quantum annealing, but we have also seen proposals for learning algorithms using gate-based quantum computers, continuous-variable and open quantum systems. The latest results in the field show distinct advantages in specific learning scenarios, but much more work is needed to develop algorithms for near-term quantum devices. The proposed invited session showcases some of the most interesting results and discusses major open questions.

Hartmut Neven (Google), Yariv Yanay (University of Maryland)

17.01.18
Quantum Characterisation, Verification and Validation (DQI)Quantum systems are predicted to outperform current digital technologies at various information processing tasks, such as simulating the dynamics of quantum systems and integer factorization. This session will focus on Quantum Characterization, Verification, and Validation (QCVV), the procedure for estimating the quality of physical quantum systems for use as information processors. This session will cover the three components of QCVV: Characterizing the effect of control operations on a quantum system, and the nature of external noise acting on the quantum system; verifying that a control operation implements a desired ideal operation to within a specified precision and validating that the quantum information processor can solve specific problems. As quantum information processors scale up and improve, these three tasks become increasingly important and we shall cover how these tasks are being addressed.

Robin Blume-Kohout (Sandia), Steve Flamia (University of Sydney), Josh Combes (University of Colorado-Boulder)

17.01.19
Noise reduction and error mitigation in quantum computing (DQI)As quantum information processors scale up, from 1 to 2 to 5 to (now) 20 or more qubits, noise and errors remain a major challenge. Unfortunately, many of the standard tools for characterizing these errors become impractical beyond two or three qubits. Further progress towards computationally useful quantum devices therefore demands new approaches to modeling, measuring, and mitigating both familiar error processes (decoherence of individual qubits) as well as emergent ones that threaten standard approaches to fault-tolerant error correction (crosstalk, leakage, correlated errors, etc.). This focus session highlights progress on characterizing this diverse spectrum of physical errors, modeling their impact, and mitigating their effects in near-term, noisy, intermediate-scale quantum devices.

Irfan Siddiqi (Berkeley), Matthew Ware (Raytheon BBN Technologies), Kevin Young (Sandia), Seth Merkel (IBM)

17.01.20
Quantum Control (DQI)The maturation of quantum information technologies highlights an opportunity for quantum control solutions to accelerate pathways to useful quantum systems. Quantum control as a focused discipline provides means for improving system performance in the presence of noise and imperfections, as well as engineering and accessing complex quantum states and dynamics of interest. The confluence of emerging capabilities in controlled coherent dynamics and dissipative reservoir engineering with advances in machine learning is positioning quantum control as an enabler of a new class of exploratory physics investigations. This session will bring together theorists and experimentalists working across different areas in quantum control, assess recent progress and outstanding challenges, and identify directions where control can enable further advances in fundamental quantum physics.

Lorenza Viola (Dartmouth), Ken Brown (Duke University), Andrew Cross (IBM)

17.01.21
Advances in Qubit Measurement (DQI)Measurements on quantum systems are at the heart of every quantum physics course and absolutely key for either processing quantum information (error correction) or controlling quantum systems (feedback). The advent of experiments on quantum computing systems has triggered a new wave of research on the topic of measuring the state of qubits with increasing speed and fidelity, while retaining an ideally non-demolition measurement process; for example, one that does not change the state of the qubit. Understanding the tradeoffs surrounding control and measurement, along with maintaining high coherence, can be drivers for developing new methods that make for good quantum computing systems. This session will address the experimental and theoretical progress made in measurements of qubits, focusing on systems of quantum dot qubits, superconducting qubits, and other hybrid systems.

Patrick Harvey-Collard (Delft University of Technology), Ray Simmonds (NIST)

17.01.22
Quantum software and compilers (DQI)Two important developments in quantum computing in recent years have made this a privileged time in the history of the field: first is computers being built with 50-100 qubits and high fidelity gates (so called NISQ computers), and the second is public access to such machines. These milestones have made quantum software more important than ever. Good software is at the heart of putting these machines to work. It allows the computation to efficiently exploit the limited resources of NISQ computers, accelerates finding useful applications, enables developing algorithms and tools for scaled quantum computers, allows users to explore techniques for error mitigation and correction, and can reduce user error through better programming constructs and feedback. Finally, software is the entry point for cloud access quantum computers, opening up the field to thousands of new users who bring new insights and expertise. This focus session is intended to bring together researchers working on all aspects of the quantum software stack: quantum programming languages, compilers and optimizers, software for characterizing errors and finding error correction codes, classical simulation of quantum computation, and libraries for quantum algorithms and applications. Topics may also take the form of identifying gaps in existing software stacks or possible interoperability among them. Of particular interest is identifying ways that better software can accelerate the pace towards practical quantum computation by offering greater efficiency.

Raphael Pooser (University of Tennessee), Ali Javadi (IBM), Krysta Svore (Microsoft)

17.01.23
Quantum Error Correction Experiment and Theory (DQI)Quantum error correction is an algorithmic way to reduce the effect of physical errors on a quantum computation by encoding quantum information into a subspace of the entire system. This focus session will highlight recent experimental advances towards quantum error correction and novel theoretical methods for developing and implementing quantum error correcting codes. Topics will vary from topological codes to bosonic codes and from fault-tolerant stabilizer measurements to symmetry protected subspaces.

Ken Brown (Duke University), Andrew Cross (IBM), Lorenza Viola (Dartmouth College)

17.01.24
Continuous variable quantum computing and simulation (DQI)The science of quantum information over the last two decades has centered on the manipulation of individual quanta of information, known as qubits. Quantum computers, quantum cryptography and quantum teleportation are among the most celebrated ideas that have emerged from this field. It was realized later on that using continuous-variable quantum information carriers, instead of qubits, constitutes an extremely powerful alternative approach to quantum information processing. This focus session focuses on continuous-variable quantum information systems that includes quantized modes of bosonic systems such as the different degrees of freedom of the electromagnetic field, vibrational modes of solids, atomic ensembles, nuclear spins in a quantum dot, Josephson junctions, and Bose-Einstein condensates.

Steve Girvin (Yale), Nick Menicucci (RMIT University), Akira Furusawa (Univ of Tokyo), Barbara Terhal (Delft/Juelich)

17.01.25
Quantum computing architectures (DQI)The increasing importance of quantum hardware design and development underpins how quantum computers will scale into the fault-tolerant, error-corrected regime. Quantum architecture design brings together expertise in quantum algorithm design and optimisation, error-correction and fault-tolerance with detailed knowledge of device physics and quantum system fabrication and control. This session will examine current blueprints for quantum computing architectures and what these designs can tell us about effective system design for scalable quantum computing. What challenges lie ahead for mass manufacturing, infrastructure, automated operations and what insights we can gain now about the design of the fundamental building blocks of computational systems that will prevent roadblocks and dead ends as these systems scale to larger numbers of physical qubits.

Jungsang Kim (Duke University), Simon Devitt (UTS), Simon Benjamin (Oxford), Rod Van Meter (Keio University) Tsai Jaw-Shen (Tokyo University)

17.01.26
Quantum computing algorithms (DQI)The field of quantum algorithms is experiencing rapid growth. Areas in which quantum algorithms may be applied include cryptography, search and optimization and simulation of quantum systems. This focus session will highlight recent developments and near-term applications of quantum algorithms with an emphasis on new ideas and emerging themes rather than technical details.

Aram Harrow (MIT), Ashley Montanaro (University of Bristol), David Gosset (University of Waterloo), Michael Bremner (UTS)

17.01.27
Quantum Annealing and Optimization (DQI)Adiabatic quantum computing and quantum annealing are computational methods that have been proposed to solve combinatorial optimization and sampling problems. They have recently been successfully extended to include quantum simulation. Several efforts are underway to manufacture processors that implement these strategies, representing the largest integrated quantum information processing available to date. This session will expose the Physics community to some of the latest results in this exciting and rapidly developing field.

Daniel Lidar (Uni of Southern California), Elanor Rieffel (NASA), Richard Harris (D-Wave Systems Inc)

17.01.28
Quantum thermodynamics (DQI)This is an exciting time for quantum metrology and measurements of individual quantum systems. Theorists are challenging long-held beliefs and assumptions, ranging from the true limits of resolution (e.g. the Rayleigh criterion), to the proper counting of resources and ultimate achievability of bounds. Inspired by error suppression techniques in quantum computing, they are also finding new avenues to achieve these bounds despite the presence of loss and noise. Experimental work has been no less exciting: quantum-limited measurements are now being made on larger and larger systems, including superconducting circuits and quantum optomechanical systems. Experiments have investigated spin squeezed magnetometry, adaptive phase measurements in qubits and the possibility of quantum-enhanced dark matter searches. Additionally, experiments based on single solid state defects are pushing the limits of resolution down to the scale of single atoms. This session will provide a forum for discussing the most recent theoretical and experimental results related to quantum measurement, metrology and sensing, as well as provide a venue for discussing future research directions.

Ruichao Ma (Purdue University), Mohammad Ansari (Jülich/Delft), Sebasatian Deffmer (UMBC)

17.01.29
Distributed Quantum Computation, Networking and Information Security (DQI)Quantum networks form an integral part of quantum technologies, posing significant challenges to science and engineering. On the one hand, quantum networks at short distances promise a path towards scalability of quantum computing systems in which multiple smaller quantum computers are connected into one larger quantum computing cluster. On the other hand, quantum networks at large distances, i.e. a quantum internet, offer a host of new applications such as for example quantum secure communication. The objective of this session is to discuss advancements and challenges in the realization and application of networked quantum technologies. This includes all aspects involved in networked quantum computing and communication systems, ranging from theoretical designs and experimental implementations, all the way to the development of quantum algorithms and protocols for quantum networks.

Mikhail Lukin (Harvard), Artur Ekert (Oxford University), Hoi-Kwong (University of Toronto), Fabio Scarani (Sapienza University of Rome)

17.01.30
Quantum Metrology and Sensing (DQI)This is an exciting time for quantum metrology and measurements of individual quantum systems. Theorists are challenging long-held beliefs and assumptions, ranging from the true limits of resolution (e.g. the Rayleigh criterion), to the proper counting of resources and ultimate achievability of bounds. Inspired by error suppression techniques in quantum computing, they are also finding new avenues to achieve these bounds despite the presence of loss and noise. Experimental work has been no less exciting: quantum-limited measurements are now being made on larger and larger systems, including superconducting circuits and quantum optomechanical systems. Experiments have investigated spin squeezed magnetometry, adaptive phase measurements in qubits and the possibility of quantum-enhanced dark matter searches. Additionally, experiments based on single solid state defects are pushing the limits of resolution down to the scale of single atoms. This session will provide a forum for discussing the most recent theoretical and experimental results related to quantum measurement, metrology and sensing, as well as provide a venue for discussing future research directions.

Aashish Clerk (University of Chicago), Natalie De Leon (Princeton), Rafał Demkowicz-Dobrzański (University of Warszawski)

17.01.31
Quantum Foundations (DQI)The field of quantum information has sometimes been called “applied quantum foundations”. This is why work in the foundations of quantum mechanics finds its natural home in the Division of Quantum Information. Quantum foundations research includes all fundamental aspects of quantum entanglement, Bell inequalities, contextuality results like the Kochen-Specker theorem, complementarity, quantum measurement theory, various conundrums like Wigner’s friend, delayed choice experiments, and the like, as well as conceptual work in quantum interpretations such as Everett’s many-world interpretation and QBism.

Matthew Leifer (Chapman University), Rob Spekkens (Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics)

17.01.32
Teaching quantum information at all levels (FEd, DQI) [same as 27.01.01]The APS March Meeting brings together the world’s experts in quantum information science and technology, many of whom are also leading the way in education efforts related to QIS. In this session, we want to give an opportunity to exchange creative ideas about QIS education. This could include how particular QIS topics are being taught, descriptions of QIS courses or resources that are appropriate for a range of levels (e.g., high school, undergraduate, or graduate), lab education in QIS, QIS degree programs, and informal science education and outreach. Please share what you are doing to help our community excite and educate the next generation of quantum scientists and engineers. This is a general interest session, so March Meeting attendees can contribute a talk to this focus session in addition to their technical/scientific contributed talk.

Benjamin Zwickl (Rochester Institute of Technology), Peter Turner (Macquarie University and Sydney Quantum Academy)

17.01.33
Materials for Quantum Information Science (DMP, DQI) [same as 13.01.04]
17.02.00
DQI Standard Sorting Categories
17.03.00
Superconducting quantum information
17.04.00
Semiconducting quantum information
17.05.00
AMO quantum information
17.06.00
Topological quantum information
17.07.00
Quantum computing algorithms
17.08.00
General quantum information and quantum computation
17.09.00
Quantum foundations

Matter at Extreme Conditions (DCOMP/DMP/GSCCM)

18.01.00
GSCCM Focus Sessions
18.01.01
Materials in Extremes: Bridging Simulations and Experiments (GSCCM)The behavior of matter under extreme conditions of high pressure, temperature, strain and strain rate is of fundamental scientific importance. Geophysical processes in the core of the Earth and other planets, matter withstanding hypervelocity impacts of comets, shock wave compression of materials, detonation of explosives, high pressure and high temperature synthesis of novel materials, failure of materials reaching their intrinsic limit of performance, all require an understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of materials response at the atomic, microstructural, and continuum levels. The advent of x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs), 3rd-4th generation synchrotron sources, and static and dynamic compression facilities in the US (NIF, APS/ANL, LCLS/SLAC) and elsewhere (European XFEL, SACLA, ESRF) as well as recent advances in theory and modeling open up new exciting opportunities for successful collaborations between experiment and theory/simulations. This focus session, consisting of several invited and contributed talks, will assess recent experimental and computational efforts towards exploring the fundamental properties of materials at extreme conditions, including:
(1) high-pressure and high temperature synthesis and characterization of materials;
(2) static high pressure and shock-induced materials behavior, including plasticity, phase transitions, and chemical reactions;
(3) high strain rate phenomena occurring upon ultrafast energy deposition;
(4) static and dynamic properties of energetic materials, including structural stability at high P-T conditions, P-T phase diagrams, and detonation phenomena;
(5) properties of matter in the warm dense regime;
(6) new computational methods including development of interatomic potentials, multi-scale simulations, techniques for reaching longer timescales, and novel applications of data science and exascale computations to simulate matter at extreme conditions.

Ivan Oleynik, University of South Florida, Email: oleynik@usf.edu; John Borg Marquette University, Email: john.borg@marquette.edu; Cindy Bolme, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Email: cbolme@lanl.gov; Nenad Velisavljevic, Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, Email: HPCAT-Director@anl.gov

18.02.00
GSCCM Standard Sorting Categories
18.03.00
Theory and Simulation of Materials at Extreme Conditions
18.04.00
Static High-Pressure Experiments
18.05.00
Dynamic High-Pressure Experiments
18.06.00
Other Extreme Conditions

Instrumentation and Measurements (GIMS)

19.00.00
GIMS Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
19.01.00
GIMS Focus Sessions
19.01.01
Advances in Scanned Probe Microscopy 1: Novel approaches and ultrasensitive detection (GIMS)
19.01.02
Advances in Scanned Probe Microscopy 2: High frequencies and Optical Techniques (GIMS)
19.01.03
Advances in Scanned Probe Microscopy 3: Scanning Probes Spectroscopic Techniques (GIMS)
19.01.04
Advances in Scanned Probe Microscopy 4: Machine Learning for Correlative and Analytical Measurements in Scanning Probe Microscopy (GIMS)
19.01.05
Advances in Nanolithography and Atomic Scale Fabrication: Methods and Theory for Directing Assembly of Matter Using Focused Beams and Scanning Probes (GIMS)
19.01.06
Optical Spectroscopic Measurements of 2D Materials (FIAP, DMP, GIMS) [same as 08.01.07]
19.01.07
Tools for Exploring Materials Physics at the Frontier of Time and Length Scales (GIMS, DMP)The exploration of materials properties and the discovery of new materials is intimately connected with advances in tools that allow to synthesize, characterize, and model materials at fundamental length, time, and energy scales. Those scales have reached the level of atomic control, i.e. the constituents of any materials on the nanoscale, but recently, approaches to explore materials with atomic precision across multiple length, time and energy scales have gained increased interest. This includes the synthesis of multidimensional artificial materials that don’t exist in nature, materials far from equilibrium that only exist for ultrashort time scales and novel ways to characterize properties of quantum and nanosystems using unprecedented techniques. Computational efforts using high-performance tools are starting to provide essential support in this endeavor. State-of-the-art techniques using neutrons, fully coherent wave fronts at diffraction limits with electrons and photons, and novel advances with scanning probes are currently being developed and utilized by a growing community working in materials physics. This focus topic on recent advances in this important field that will provide a coherent view onto current capabilities and future perspective that are of interest to the broad materials physics community.

Ben McMorran (U Oregon) mcmorran@uoregon.edu; Hermann Durr (U Uppsala) hdurr@icloud.com

19.02.00
GIMS Standard Sorting Categories
19.03.00
Detectors, Sensors, and Transducers
19.04.00
Spectroscopic Techniques
19.05.00
Scattering and Diffraction
19.06.00
Microscopic and Scanning Probe Techniques
19.07.00
Signal Processing and Analysis
19.08.00
Thermal and IR Instrumentation
19.09.00
Acoustic and Ultrasonic Instrumentation
19.10.00
Neutron, IR, and X-ray Optics and Sources
19.11.00
Measurement technology for renewable and fossil energy applications
19.12.00
Other Instrumentation and Measurement Science

Fluids (DFD)

20.00.00
DFD Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
20.01.00
DFD Focus Sessions
20.01.01
Granular, Porous Media, and Multiphase Flows (DFD, GSNP) [same as 03.01.30]
20.01.02
Fluid Structure Interactions (FSI) (DFD, GSNP) [same as 03.01.31]
20.01.03
Swimming, Motility, and Locomotion (DFD, DBIO, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.34, 02.01.69]
20.01.04
Biomechanics of Insect Flight (DFD, DBIO) [same as 04.01.26]
20.01.05
Physiological and Blood Flows (DFD, DBIO) [same as 04.01.27]
20.01.06
Flow of Complex Fluids: Rheology, Structure and Instabilities (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.65]
20.01.07
Drops (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.66]
20.01.08
Active Colloids (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.67]
20.01.09
Thin Films, Surface Flows and Interfaces (DFD, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.68]
20.01.10
Fluid Physics of Disease Transmission (DFD, DBIO) [same as 04.01.49]This session will focus on recent research at the intersection of fluid flow and disease spreading, including but not restricted to COVID-19. Topics of interest include aerosol dynamics (generation and dispersion of virus-laden drops), droplet deposition on surfaces, transport of drops and contaminants to and inside lungs, "washing flows", etc. Also of interest are studies on the effects of indoor and outdoor ventilation and use of personal protective gear on airborne disease spreading.

Kenny Breuer (Brown University) and Rajat Mittal (Johns Hopkins University)

20.01.11
3D Printing of Polymers and Soft Materials: From Chemistry and Processing to Devices and Characterization (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DFD, FIAP) [same as 01.01.08, 02.01.32, 03.01.34, 22.01.11]
20.01.12
Dynamics and Rheology of Polymers and Polyelectrolytes (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DBIO, DFD) [same as 01.01.11, 02.01.34, 03.01.35, 04.01.21]
20.01.13
Polymers and Soft Solids at Interfaces: Tribology, Wear, Rheology and Interactions (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DFD, DMP) [same as 01.01.16, 02.01.39, 03.01.36]
20.01.14
Active matter in complex environments (DSOFT, DBIO, GSNP, DFD) [same as 02.01.09, 04.01.01, 03.01.23]
20.01.15
Mechanics of cells and tissue (DBIO, DSOFT, GSNP DPOLY, DFD ) [same as 04.01.02, 02.01.72, 03.01.24, 01.01.43]
20.01.16
Electrostatic Manipulation of Fluids and Soft Matter (DSOFT, DPOLY, DBIO, DFD) [same as 02.01.03, 01.01.34, 04.01.30]
20.01.17
Microflows Meet Soft Matter: Compliance, Growth, Instabilities and Beyond (DSOFT, DFD, GSNP) [same as 02.01.05, 03.01.41]
20.01.18
Steerable particles: new ways to manipulate fluid-mediated forces (GSNP, DFD, DSOFT) [same as 03.01.10, 02.01.27]
20.01.19
Physics of Liquids (GSNP, DSOFT, DCP, DFD) [same as 03.01.08, 02.01.24, 05.01.11]
20.01.20
Rheology of Gels (DSOFT, DBIO, GSNP, DPOLY, DFD) [same as 02.01.14, 04.01.43, 03.01.47, 01.01.53]
20.01.21
FOCUS TOPIC CANCELLED (DSOFT, DPOLY, DBIO, DFD) [same as 02.01.57, 01.01.56, 04.01.44]
20.01.22
Soft matter physics in a geophysical context (DSOFT, DFD) [same as 02.01.16]
20.01.23
Physics of Biofilms (DBIO, DFD, DPOLY, DSOFT) [same as 04.01.48, 01.01.52, 02.01.55]
20.01.24
Granular Flows Beyond Simple Mechanical Models (GSNP, DSOFT, DFD) [same as 03.01.04, 02.01.22]
20.02.00
DFD Standard Sorting Categories
20.03.00
Flow of Complex Fluids, Polymers, Gels
20.04.00
Pattern Formation and Nonlinear Dynamics
20.05.00
Instabilities and Turbulence
20.06.00
Computational Fluid Dynamics
20.07.00
Drops, Bubbles and Interfacial Fluid Mechanics
20.08.00
Cellular Fluid Mechanics
20.09.00
Swimming, Motility and Locomotion
20.10.00
Geophysical and Climate Dynamics
20.11.00
Granular Flows
20.12.00
Multiphase Flows
20.13.00
Fluid Dynamics – Other

Energy Research and Applications (GERA)

21.00.00
GERA Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
21.01.00
GERA Focus Sessions
21.01.01
Advances in Thermal Energy Conversion for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 22.01.05]
21.01.02
Computational Modeling of Materials for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP, DCOMP) [same as 22.01.06, 16.01.33]
21.01.03
Recent Advances in Solar Photovoltaics and Energy Conversion: Materials and Devices (GERA, FIAP) [same as 22.01.07]
21.01.04
Advances in Wide Bandgap Materials and Devices for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 22.01.08]
21.01.05
Advances in Energy Storage Materials and Devices for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 22.01.09]
21.01.06
Advances in Magnetic and Dielectric Materials for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 22.01.10]
21.01.07
Dynamics of polymers and electrolytes in bulk and in confinement (DPOLY, GERA) [same as 01.01.27]
21.02.00
GERA Standard Sorting Categories
21.03.00
Alternative Energy
21.04.00
Energy Storage
21.05.00
Biofuels, Solar Fuels and Artificial Photosynthetic Systems
21.06.00
Energy Conservation and Efficiency
21.07.00
Electricity Production and Conversion
21.08.00
Energy for Transportation
21.09.00
Hydrogen Production, Storage and Delivery
21.10.00
Solid State Lighting

Applications (IT, Medical/Bio, Photonics, etc.) (FIAP)

22.00.00
FIAP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
22.01.00
FIAP Focus Sessions
22.01.01
Moore's Law: More and Beyond (FIAP)
22.01.02
Integer and fractional quantum Hall effects and related topics (FIAP)
22.01.03
Soft Matters in Industrial Applications (DSOFT, FIAP) [same as 02.01.74]
22.01.04
Spin transport and Magnetization Dynamics in Metals-Based Systems (GMAG, DMP, FIAP) [same as 10.01.05]
22.01.05
Advances in Thermal Energy Conversion for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 21.01.01]
22.01.06
Computational Modeling of Materials for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP, DCOMP) [same as 21.01.02, 16.01.33]
22.01.07
Recent Advances in Solar Photovoltaics and Energy Conversion: Materials and Devices (GERA, FIAP) [same as 21.01.03]
22.01.08
Advances in Wide Bandgap Materials and Devices for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 22.01.04]
22.01.09
Advances in Energy Storage Materials and Devices for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 21.01.05]
22.01.10
Advances in Magnetic and Dielectric Materials for Energy Applications (GERA, FIAP) [same as 21.01.06]
22.01.11
3D Printing of Polymers and Soft Materials: From Chemistry and Processing to Devices and Characterization (DPOLY, DSOFT, GSNP, DFD, FIAP) [same as 01.01.08, 02.01.32, 03.01.34, 20.01.11]
22.02.00
FIAP Standard Sorting Categories
22.03.00
Optical/Laser and High Frequency Devices and Applications Including Optoelectronics and Photonics
22.03.00
Applications of Semiconductors, Dielectrics, Complex Oxides (non-magnetic)
22.04.00
Applications of Superconductors and Superconducting Devices
22.05.00
Applications of Thermoelectrics
22.06.00
Magnetic Devices and Applications (FIAP
22.07.00
Bionanotechnology and Applications of Polymers and Biomaterials
22.08.00
Nanotechnology (non-bio)
22.09.00
Nanomanufacturing

Data Science (GDS)

23.00.00
GDS Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
23.01.00
GDS Focus Sessions
23.01.01
Big Data in Physics (GDS, DCOMP, GSNP) [same as 16.01.16, 03.01.43]Physicists are at the forefront of analysis and exploration of big data, from the huge scientific collaborations in astronomy, particle physics, climate science, to research areas that are near to everyday life like cancer imaging and material science. The infrastructure and methodology of how we explore and analyze big data is essential for both theoretical and experimental efforts, and the advancements in such capability greatly impacts science and society. This session will discuss research related to big data analysis and exploration in physics contexts.

Jie Ren, Merck & Co., Inc., jie.ren@merck.com; Wolfgang Losert, University of Maryland, wlosert@umd.edu

23.01.02
Deep Learning for Dynamical Systems (GDS, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.37]The need to model dynamical behavior from data is pervasive across physics and other disciplines. In recent years, Deep Learning has attracted considerable attention in several domains, including Dynamical Systems. Using machine learning technology to discover accurate mathematical models of dynamical systems directly from data becomes increasingly important in the era of data. The idea of leveraging neural networks to model dynamical systems has been proposed since the 90s, but since there are still many unanswered questions. This session will focus on Deep Learning in modeling Dynamical Systems. We will explore the recent advancements in the field and try to answer these open questions.

Maria Longobardi, BAQIS

23.01.03
Deep Learning for Spectroscopy (GDS, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.38]Spectroscopic techniques are essential tools for studying chemical compositions, crystal structures, and electromagnetic properties of hard and soft condensed matter from atomic to mesoscale. Recent advances in machine learning have led to new opportunities for improving the spectral data quality and for analyzing the measurement result. This focus session will cover all types of photon, electron, atomic, and molecular spectroscopic studies augmented by machine learning and deep neural networks.

Cheng-Chien Chen, University of Alabama at Birmingham

23.01.04
AI Materials Design and Discovery (GDS, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.39]AI and machine learning have created a new paradigm for materials design and discovery in fundamental and applied research. This emerging data-driven framework is also revolutionizing the deployment of novel quantum and functional materials with an unprecedented speed. This focus session will highlight contributions to advancing the field of materials informatics. The topics of interests will include but not limited to (i) creating materials database with ab initio calculations or experiments, (ii) applying AI techniques for predictive materials modeling, (iii) developing new materials-related AI algorithms and innovative feature descriptors, and (iv) enhancing the insights for interpretability and physical understanding of AI models.

Cheng-Chien Chen, University of Alabama at Birmingham

23.01.05
Open Science/Open Data (GDS)Science relies on the sharing of ideas, results, methods and data. As modern research is more complex and more data-driven, progress in scientific knowledge becomes intimately tighten to research data availability. Open Science can be used to support several disciplines and applications, including science, finance, statistics, weather and society. Open data, including simulations, source codes, laboratory measurements and data generated by the social sciences, can increase the transparencies in science and foster cross-disciplinary collaborations. Moreover, open access to the research results would enable faster and broader diffusion of scientific knowledge. This session will focus on the great potential and the challenges of Open Data and Open Science. We will discuss the state of the art, the perspectives for the next future, and some case studies.

Maria Longobardi, BAQIS

23.01.06
AI & Real World Networks (GDS, DBIO) [same as 04.01.50]This focus session is for research that advance scientific understanding of real-world systems using large datasets and data science methods. Recent events especially in the COVID era have highlighted the importance of fundamental scientific advances in analyzing and understanding patterns through increasingly available data. Contributions will be accepted across wide topics such as social networks, epidemiological networks, transportation networks, and brain networks (not an exclusive list).

Skanda Vivek, Georgia Gwinnett College

23.01.07
Autonomous Systems and Control (GDS)Advances in machine learning, automated experimental control, miniaturization of diagnostics, and networked computing power over the past two decades have led to popularization of artificial intelligence approaches to autonomous experimentation for optimization and discovery in physics. Online collection of data in a machine-friendly format (e.g. database or dataframe) has allowed for instant analysis with data science techniques, greatly accelerating the overall experimental process. Coupled with active learning models, sequential experiments may even be designed and proceed without human intervention. This methodology has been successful for both physical experimentation as well as in the context of theoretical modelling such as molecular dynamics simulations. This focus session explores the experimental and computational techniques that make autonomous experimentation a success.

William Ratcliff (NIST Center for Neutron Research, NIST; Department of MSE, University of Maryland, College Park); Brian Barnes (US Army Research Lab - Aberdeen)

23.01.08
AI and Statistical/Thermal Physics (GDS, GSNP, DCOMP) [same as 03.01.45, 16.01.40]Statistical Physics has been part of numerous recent breakthroughs in AI. Methods from statistical physics are proving valuable for enhancing AI algorithms, or making AI algorithms more explainable. At the same time AI algorithms are contributing solutions to a growing list of complex problems in statistical/thermal physics. This session welcomes contributions to all aspects of this convergence of Artificial Intelligence and Statistical/Thermal Physics.

Wolfgang Losert, University of Maryland

23.01.09
Visualization Techniques and Systems (GDS, DCOMP) [same as 16.01.41]Visualization techniques and systems are playing an increasing role in physics as datasets continue to expand and data analysis challenges become more sophisticated. Visualization is integral to modern data science. Visualization offers unique opportunities for human-in-the-loop analysis including interactive, real-time exploratory analysis of millions of data points, augmented reality, and techniques for exploring the inner works of machine learning models (i.e., explainable AI). Visualization is also integral to how we communicate and disseminate physical insights. By bringing together those working on visualization systems and techniques for physics applications, this session will be a forum for advancing data science in physics that is complementary to on-going initiatives and sessions focused on automated data analysis.

Kyle Wm. Hall (Institute for Computational Molecular Science & Department of Chemistry, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA) & William D. Ratcliff (NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD & Department of Materials Science and Engineering, U. Maryland, College Park, MD)

23.01.10
Machine Learning for Quantum Matter (DCOMP, GDS, DMP) [same as 16.01.05]
23.01.11
Machine Learning and Data in Polymer Physics (DPOLY, DBIO, DCOMP, GDS, FIAP) [same as 01.01.01, 04.01.19, 16.01.17, 08.01.05]
23.01.12
Emerging Trends in Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Machine Learning (DCOMP, GDS, DSOFT, DPOLY) [same as 16.01.11, 02.01.71, 01.01.50]
23.01.13
Deep Learning for Computer Vision (GDS)The success of deep learning approaches in the analysis of images and movies is starting to impact a wide range of research areas in physics. The goal of this focus session is to share best practices in deep learning for computer vision as applied across the physics research areas represented at the APS March Meeting, in particular, biophysics, soft matter physics, medical physics, and statistical and nonlinear physics. Both new approaches to deep learning and adaptation and implementation of existing deep learning tools are of interest to this focus session.

Mohammad Soltanieh-ha (Boston University, soltaniehha.m@gmail.com)

23.01.14
Machine learning for biomolecular design and simulation (DPOLY, GDS, DSOFT, DBIO, DCOMP) [same as 01.01.30, 02.01.43, 04.01.38, 16.01.22]
23.01.15
Artificial intelligence and machine learning in medicine and biomedicine (GMED, GDS) [same as 25.01.01]Research in medicine and biomedicine generates large datasets, including anatomic and pathologic imaging, genetic assays, demographic information, and clinical data. We are in the midst of a technological revolution with tremendous advances in imaging technology, omics science, and wide adoption of wearable and IoT devices. Health information has become multi-modal, with high temporal and spatial resolution complementing increasingly granular clinical information. Manual parsing of these data limits their utility, and there now exist tremendous opportunities for both automated processing and deeper analysis of datasets. Artificial intelligence can improve the utility of big medical datasets by accelerating analysis for real-time decision making, guiding treatment regimens, elucidating indicators of disease state, and helping determine likelihood of response. In this focus session, we seek submissions on the use of AI, machine learning, and deep learning to address management and analysis of medical and biomedical data, with an emphasis on efforts towards development of therapeutics or tools for clinical decision-making.

Michael A. Boss (American College of Radiology, GMED), Jie Ren (Merck, GDDS)

23.01.16
Quantum machine learning (DQI, GDS) [same as 17.01.17]
23.02.00
GDS Standard Sorting Categories
23.03.00
Data Science in Physics
23.04.00
Machine Learning
23.05.00
AI and Deep Learning
23.06.00
Big Data, Data Integration and Assimilation
23.07.00
Data Science Education
23.08.00
Automous Experimentation

Laser Science (DLS)

24.00.00
DLS Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
24.01.00
DLS Focus Sessions
24.01.01
Ultrafast Dynamics and Control of Quantum Materials (DLS)
24.01.02
Ultrafast specroscopies and coherent phenomena in the x-ray domain (DCP, DCMP, DLS, DAMOP) [same as 05.01.02, 06.01.10]
24.01.03
Coherent Nonlinear Optical Microscopy (DCP, DBIO, GSNP, DSOFT, DPOLY, DLS) [same as 05.01.03, 04.01.22, 03.01.29, 02.01.75, 01.01.45]
24.02.00
DLS STANDARD CATEGORIES
24.03.00
Laser Science
24.04.00
Ultrafast Spectroscopy
24.05.00
Quantum Materials
24.06.00
Non-equilibrium Dynamics

Medical Physics (GMED)

25.00.00
GMED Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
25.01.00
GMED Focus Sessions
25.01.01
Artificial intelligence and machine learning in medicine and biomedicine (GMED, GDS) [same as 23.01.15]
25.01.02
Magnetism in biomedicine (GMED, GMAG, DBIO) [same as 10.01.10, 04.01.34]Magnetism plays a key role in biomedical technologies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic particle imaging (MPI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), magnetoencephalography (MEG), magnetogenetics, magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia, contrast agents, diagnostics and therapeutics. This focus session will target advanced magnetic materials, spin manipulation, and magnetic stimulation of tissue, highlighting their use in medical and cellular imaging and therapies. In particular, we solicit talks on new methods of spin hyperpolarization to enhance MRI, new types of nanomagnetic contrast agents and therapies, new ways to use magnetism to stimulate and probe tissues. The session will focus on new magnetic metrology to sense in-vivo magnetic fields, pathologies, cell activity, and neural activity. These metrologies may include low field MRI, nanoMRI, magnetic cell tracking, multimodal imaging, real time imaging during therapy. The emphasis will be on how novel physics of magnetism and spins can enable new biomedical applications, on a scale from virus to humans.

Stephen Russek, NIST Boulder, CO, Hari Srikanth, University of South Florida, FL

25.01.03
Quantitative stress imaging: from elastomers to biological tissues to image-based modeling (GMED, DSOFT) [same as 02.01.13]Medical physics has developed a variety of approaches to quantify stress in tissue: MRI, (micro)CT, X-ray, Ultrasound, mechanical measurements and optical modalities. These imaging techniques present a broad research field, spanning multiple scales (from nanometers to meters) and different applications (in-vivo, ex-vivo, and in-situ). The soft matter community has simultaneously developed similar quantitative stress imaging methods, additionally including mechanochemical sensors, fluorescence, photo-elasticity, rheo-optics and DIC. This session intends to provide a platform for exchange of perspectives between medical and soft matter physicists on quantitative stress imaging. One particular goal is to better combine quantitative stress measurements with computer simulations of deformations in tissue and other soft materials

Matija Milanic, University of Ljubljana, SLO, Joshua Dijksman, Wageningen University, NL

25.02.00
GMED STANDARD CATEGORIES
25.03.00
Physics of medical therapies (e.g., radiation, photonic, and ultrasonic therapy, therapy guidance)
25.04.00
Physics of medical diagnostics (e.g., EEG, ECG, oximetry, blood pressure measurements)
25.05.00
Physics of medical imaging (e.g., CT, MRI, PET, SPECT, US, optical)
25.06.00
Physics of medical technologies (e.g., surgical hardware, decision systems, medical accelerators)
25.07.00
Physics of disease states and normal physiology (e.g., cancer, neuro-degenerative, immune system, vascular system)
25.08.00
Medical data analysis
25.09.00
General medical physics

Climate Physics (GPC)

26.00.00
GPC Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
26.01.00
GPC Focus Sessions
26.01.01
Rare events, tipping points, and abrupt changes in the climate system (GPC)The Earth system has strong internal variability on many timescales. Large-scale transitions can occur due to tipping points in components of the climate system, and in many cases these depend on complex interactions between different sub-systems. However, the role of small-scale processes in inducing these transitions is not well understood for many important tipping points. These issues have been elevated in importance since the Earth’s climate is currently experiencing an unprecedented transition under non-stationary anthropogenic radiative forcing and is far out of equilibrium with this forcing. This session aims at connecting fluctuations and responses for the climate system with a focus on issues involving abrupt climate change, climatic hysteresis, tipping points, and climate extremes as rare events. General approaches and novel measures to quantify the climate response to non-stationary forcing in the climate system are encouraged. We also seek talks on complex interactions between the different components and subcomponents of the Earth system that illuminate how these interactions can induce rapid, large-scale transitions in its major components. Submissions which are focused on the study of reasons and mechanisms of the emergent behavior are especially welcome.

William Collins, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Mary Silber, University of Chicago

26.01.02
Statistical and nonlinear physics of Earth and its climate (GPC, GSNP) [same as 03.01.44]Observations of natural processes on Earth, including those driven by its changing climate, present challenging applied problems that have potential to advance research in statistical and nonlinear physics. These phenomena are not observed in a pristine laboratory setting, and come not only with environmental heterogeneities, but also with enormous uncertainties about the underlying physical models. This session is aimed at bringing together researchers investigating Earth, its landscape and ecosystems, and its climate, all through a lens of statistical and nonlinear physics. We envision a broad set of topics, from critical phenomena associated with river networks, melt ponds on Arctic sea ice, and vegetation pattern formation in drylands, to the distribution of lakes on Earth’s surface and the fracture mechanics of ice shelves in the Antarctic. How might we use satellite and terrestrial observational data to constrain models and test predictions? What is the potential for table-top experiments to probe physical processes that usually operate on a very large scale? What is an appropriate pairing of conceptual theoretical physics models with large scale computational ones to advance understanding of Earth in a changing climate? This session will facilitate an exchange of ideas and pressing questions between physicists and Earth scientists, and explore how modern methods of statistical and nonlinear physics can have an impact on these problems, and what new physics can be learned by studying Earth's many physical processes.

Justin C. Burton, Emory University and Mary Silber, University of Chicago

26.02.00
GPC Standard Sorting Categories
26.03.00
Physics of Climate

Physics Education (FEd)

27.00.00
FEd Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
27.01.00
FEd Focus Sessions
27.01.01
Teaching Quantum Information at All Levels (FEd, DQI) [same as 17.01.32]
27.02.00
FEd Standard Sorting Categories
27.03.00
Pre-Service Teacher Preparation
27.04.00
International Science Education
27.05.00
K-12 Education
27.06.00
Informal Education and Public Outreach
27.07.00
Undergraduate Education (For Undergraduate Research, see 34.0)
27.08.00
Graduate Education
27.09.00
Education and Public Policy
27.10.00
Professional Development
27.11.00
Physics Education Research
27.12.00
Remote Instruction

Physics Outreach and Engaging the Public (FOEP)

28.00.00
FOEP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
28.02.00
Outreach and Engaging the Public

History of Physics (FHPP)

29.00.00
FHPP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
29.02.00
History and Philosophy of Physics

International Physics (FIP)

30.00.00
FIP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
30.02.00
International Physics

Early Career Scientists (FECS)

31.00.00
FECS Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
31.02.00
Early Career Physics
31.03.00
FECS Postdoctoral Poster Competition

Public Policy (FPS)

32.00.00
FPS Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
32.02.00
Public Policy

Graduate Student Affairs (FGSA)

33.00.00
FGSA Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
33.02.00
Graduate Student Affairs

Undergraduate Research (APS/SPS)

34.02.00
Undergraduate Research/Society of Physics Students

Committee on Minorities (COM)

35.00.00
COM Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
35.02.00
COM Standard Sorting Categories

Status of Women in Physics (CSWP)

36.00.00
CSWP Symposium Invited Speaker (Invitation Only)
36.02.00
CSWP Standard Sorting Categories

General Physics

37.02.00
General Physics